Viewing 1–25 of 484 documents: "women & children in distress"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
August 26, 1788 Claim of Eleanor Montgomery Joseph Howell Jonathan Nicholson Eleanor Montgomery claim for half pay. Asks for a speedy answer as the poor woman is in distress and has several children to maintain
October 8, 1795 Oblige a Distressed Female Sally Greaton Timothy Pickering She has been deprived of her small stipend in order to pay Mr. Greaton's debts, which has been extremely difficult for her. She asks that Pickering give her some money to relieve her distress.
November 12, 1794 Indian attack on women and children Anthony Crutcher William Crutcher Anthony Crutcher informs his brother William: "Yesterday I was a spectator to the most tragical scene that ever I saw in my life. The Indians made an attack on Colonel [John] Sevier's station, killed Snyder, his wife, and child, one of Colonel Sevier's children, and another wounded and scalped, which must die." Colonel Sevier himself was defending his house and wife. "It is impossible to...
February 3, 1796 Regarding Account of Mr. Greaton Sally Greaton Timothy Pickering Mrs. Greaton follows up on her correspondence with William Simmons, trying to secure herself a regularly paid portion of her husband's pay.
July 19, 1792 Letter to Captain Putnam One of the Wea Men Rufus Putnam The speaker calls Captain Putnam a companion, which signifies a stronger relationship than even that of a brother. The speaker admits his fears that the women and children of his tribe will die if they remain, and wishes for the Indians to be taken to the O. post [?]. Chiefs who are well-spoken will congregate there, and the speaker wishes for Putnam to travel there as well. Putnam responds...
August 9, 1791 If You Foolishly Prefer War James Wilkinson Indian Nations Living on the Wabash River Wilkinson warns the Indians of the trouble and distress that will befall them if they ignore the voice of reason and persist in joining those tribes that are waging war against the United States.
March 20, 1792 Grow Up and Then We'll Kill You! Elijah Robertson William Blount Colonel Elijah Robertson describes for Governor Blount the Indian raids on two frontier families in which all but two small children were killed.
November 7, 1794 Southwest Indian relations McCleish William Blount Letter to Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory, regarding relations with the Southwestern Indians. Mentions one Bill Colbert, who happened upon a canoe with a Cherokee man and four prisoners (two women and two children).
February 8, 1794 Melancholy Distress James Leonard Samuel Hodgdon [Partly illegible] Melancholy distress has reduced Leonard to such an extent that he must solicit Hodgon's voice in helping him to find employment.
April 11, 1793 Frontier Families Are Collected at Stations William Blount Henry Knox Blount reports that frontier settlers are seeking protection at stations where they have to endure crowded and miserable living conditions.
September 6, 1794 Campaign against Creeks and Cherokees General Robertson Major Ore General Robertson informs Major Ore that he is to defend the district of Mero against a large party of Creeks and Cherokees of the Lower towns. Ordered to "destroy the Lower Cherokee towns... taking care to spare women and children, and to treat all prisoners, who may fall into your hands, with humanity, and thereby teach those savages to spare the citizens of the United States, under similar...
July 11, 1799 Complaint Against the Chickasaw Chiefs of the Shawnees Arthur St. Clair The Chiefs of the Shawnee complain to St. Clair about the behavior of the Chickasaw. They claim that the Chickasaw are breaking the peace and troubling the Shawnee chiefs, women, and children. They ask St. Clair to defend them and stop any possible mischief.
July 20, 1792 Lasting Peace with the Wabash Indians Rufus Putnam Wea Indians Putnam replies to the speech of the Wea Indians. He reaffirms the brotherhood between him and the Indians and says that while brothers may differ they can eventually unite again. Putnam gives his assurances that the women and children of the Wea will be protected and he will make arrangements to travel to the O. post for the meeting with all the tribes occupying land around the Wabash. He will...
October 7, 1793 An Actual State of War Constant Freeman Henry Knox Apparently the militia have destroyed an Indian town and taken women and children as prisoners. Many of the frontier settlers have removed themselves to stations in expectation of an Indian retaliation. Despite the state of war which exists in the country, Georgia has stated its conditions respecting the United States establishing peace with the Creeks.
May 5, 1791 Additional Forces for the Western Campaign Henry Knox Arthur St. Clair Knox reports on the progress of the enlistment of additional forces for the upcoming campaign. He warns that the United States does not have the resources to provide rations for the women and children who have been forced to abandon their settlements but remain at advanced posts.
September 3, 1793 Negotiations Have Failed, Wayne to Commence Offensive; Problem with Infected Clothing Henry Knox Anthony Wayne The treaty negotiations have failed so Wayne is ordered to begin the campaign against the hostile Indians. There is a possibility that some of the clothing stores have been infected with yellow fever so the appropriate preventive measures will be taken before the clothes are transported.
April 1789 George Morgan's Speech to the Indians George Morgan Delawares, Shawanese, & Cherokees Speech of George Morgan to the Delawares, Shawanese, and Cherokees at New Madrid in April 1789 in which he declares the peaceful intentions of the United States toward these tribes.
March 6, 1792 Subsistence Money due Mr. Greaton Sarah Greaton Henry Knox Sarah Greaton has written the Secretary at War, for the second time, concerning subsistence pay for her husband, Mr. Greaton. Sarah Greaton writes that she has worked exceptionally hard just to afford basic necessities for her and her children.
April 1, 1791 Gratitude to the Great Chief Little Beard [not available] Little Beard expresses his gratitude to the Great Chief, General Washington, for the grant of lands given in perpetuity to his people.
January 18, 1794 Indian Flag of Truce, and Suspicions Thereof Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Wayne Informs Knox that the Indians have sent in a flag of truce, which he believes is due to the seizure of St. Clair's field and the approach to Grand Glaize. Doubts the overture is sincere, believing the Indians may just be stalling for time to remove their women and children, store winter provisions, and scout Wayne's camp -- but accepts the necessity of losing this opportunity for a quick...
September 24, 1799 Military Discipline James McHenry Alexander Hamilton Transmits regulations, asks that an immediate stop be put to the practice of distributing rations to the children of soldiers.
March 27, 1800 Request for payment to Captain Josiah Hazard, sailing master, whose family is in distress Benjamin Stoddert James McHenry Request for payment of $100 to sailing master Captain Josiah Hazard whose family is in distress and this sum will aid in their relief.
September 1797 Indian Speech made at treaty negotiations in September 1797. Cornplanter, Chief of the Senecas [not available] Appears to be speech made at Seneca treaty negotiations that began on August 26, 1797 and continued until mid-September. Cornplanter notes that his people have agreed to sell their lands. He hopes that what he has done is for the good of his children and agreeable to the great spirit. He notes that it is in accordance with the advice of General Washington who advised us to sell our land for an...
July 13, 1791 Red Jacket's Speech Red Jacket [not available] In his speech, Red Jacket discusses the peace talks, the British forces on the frontier, British and Indian relations, and Indian independence.
December 2, 1785 Journal of Commissioners at Treaty of Hopewell, South Carolina delivered to Congress Commissioners for Treaty of Hopewell, 1785 Richard Henry Lee Commissioners give an account of the Treaty proceedings. Number of Cherokee attendees was 918. Relate that they explained cession of territory from King of Great Britain in wake of Revolutionary War. Agents of North Carolina and Georgia protested the Treaty. Discuss the boundaries, the issue of white settlements on Cherokee lands and the matter of compensation to the Cherokees for that matter....