Viewing 1–25 of 251 documents: "women"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
July 6, 1798 Women's Letters Pass Through the War Department Samuel Hodgdon Isaac Craig Hodgdon observes that the women are perplexed to find that some of the letters from their friends pass through the War Department. That being the case, the letters should be sent under one cover to only one office.
November 2, 1799 Allotment of Rations, Forage, Spirits,and Women Alexander Hamilton James Read Hamilton describes the rules regarding the allotment of rations, forage, and spirits to officers and men but there are no established rules on the subject of forage or provision of artificers for the Infantry. Four women are allowed to a company.
July 19, 1792 Letter to Captain Putnam One of the Wea Men Rufus Putnam The speaker calls Captain Putnam a companion, which signifies a stronger relationship than even that of a brother. The speaker admits his fears that the women and children of his tribe will die if they remain, and wishes for the Indians to be taken to the O. post [?]. Chiefs who are well-spoken will congregate there, and the speaker wishes for Putnam to travel there as well. Putnam responds...
November 12, 1794 Indian attack on women and children Anthony Crutcher William Crutcher Anthony Crutcher informs his brother William: "Yesterday I was a spectator to the most tragical scene that ever I saw in my life. The Indians made an attack on Colonel [John] Sevier's station, killed Snyder, his wife, and child, one of Colonel Sevier's children, and another wounded and scalped, which must die." Colonel Sevier himself was defending his house and wife. "It is impossible to...
December 1, 1798 Men & Women for Whom Passage is to be Paid, Etc. Samuel Hodgdon Commanding Officer, Troops Embarked for Charleston Upon arriving in Charleston, the Commanding Officer of the Troops is to give the captain of the vessel the number of men and women for whom the United States is to pay the passage and the freight of their articles.
November 7, 1794 Southwest Indian relations McCleish William Blount Letter to Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory, regarding relations with the Southwestern Indians. Mentions one Bill Colbert, who happened upon a canoe with a Cherokee man and four prisoners (two women and two children).
January 9, 1799 Civilizing the Creek Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Hawkins is pleased with the Creeks for accepting the plan for their civilization. The Creeks have adapted well to raising livestock and are becoming better at manufacturing. Hawkins comments on the fact that the Chiefs and their wives come to his house.
August 8, 1797 Copied from Knoxville Waste Book [not available] [not available] Copy of the entries for August 8, 1797, in the waste book of accounts at Knoxville.
April 11, 1793 Frontier Families Are Collected at Stations William Blount Henry Knox Blount reports that frontier settlers are seeking protection at stations where they have to endure crowded and miserable living conditions.
September 6, 1794 Campaign against Creeks and Cherokees General Robertson Major Ore General Robertson informs Major Ore that he is to defend the district of Mero against a large party of Creeks and Cherokees of the Lower towns. Ordered to "destroy the Lower Cherokee towns... taking care to spare women and children, and to treat all prisoners, who may fall into your hands, with humanity, and thereby teach those savages to spare the citizens of the United States, under similar...
July 11, 1799 Complaint Against the Chickasaw Chiefs of the Shawnees Arthur St. Clair The Chiefs of the Shawnee complain to St. Clair about the behavior of the Chickasaw. They claim that the Chickasaw are breaking the peace and troubling the Shawnee chiefs, women, and children. They ask St. Clair to defend them and stop any possible mischief.
March 20, 1792 Grow Up and Then We'll Kill You! Elijah Robertson William Blount Colonel Elijah Robertson describes for Governor Blount the Indian raids on two frontier families in which all but two small children were killed.
July 20, 1792 Lasting Peace with the Wabash Indians Rufus Putnam Wea Indians Putnam replies to the speech of the Wea Indians. He reaffirms the brotherhood between him and the Indians and says that while brothers may differ they can eventually unite again. Putnam gives his assurances that the women and children of the Wea will be protected and he will make arrangements to travel to the O. post for the meeting with all the tribes occupying land around the Wabash. He will...
October 7, 1793 An Actual State of War Constant Freeman Henry Knox Apparently the militia have destroyed an Indian town and taken women and children as prisoners. Many of the frontier settlers have removed themselves to stations in expectation of an Indian retaliation. Despite the state of war which exists in the country, Georgia has stated its conditions respecting the United States establishing peace with the Creeks.
October 12, 1794 Women attacked by Indians Constant Freeman Henry Knox Constant Freeman, agent for the Department of War, reports that Indians in Georgia killed and scalped a white woman and black woman, near the Cow Ford on the Oconee River. They have also stolen horses and negroes from Liberty County. Colonel Gaither has received letters from them that the Tallassee king has gone out for war, with the chiefs disapproving of his conduct.
April 9, 1799 Certification of payments; Rebecca B. Nicholson for repairing and cleaning carbines William Simmons James McHenry Certification of payments; $37 to Rebecca B. Nicholson for repairing and cleaning 37 carbines.
October 17, 1793 Letter from Timothy Barnard [Bernard] to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, on the prospects for peace, Warrior King's meeting with lower Creeks, White Lieutenant and upper Creek Chiefs Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove From Flint River, prospects for peace are good it seems. The Warrior King trying to reconcile matters. Met with leadership of Lower Creeks at Cussetah, and with White Lieutenant and upper Creek Chiefs at Tuckabatchee. Cowetas promise to lay quiet; talk strongly of killing horse thieves. Seek to get women prisoners back. Ask Seagrove to mediate and bring prisoners with him when he comes to visit....
May 5, 1791 Additional Forces for the Western Campaign Henry Knox Arthur St. Clair Knox reports on the progress of the enlistment of additional forces for the upcoming campaign. He warns that the United States does not have the resources to provide rations for the women and children who have been forced to abandon their settlements but remain at advanced posts.
April 23, 1800 Certification of payment; Rebecca Tobias, pay as matron to hospital at Kempsville Virginia William Simmons James McHenry Certification of payment; $29.41 to Rebecca Tobias, pay as matron to hospital at Kempsville, Virginia, to be paid to Lieutenant Ferdinand Claiborne, 1st Regiment of Infantry, attorney to Barney Keith, present husband.
September 3, 1793 Negotiations Have Failed, Wayne to Commence Offensive; Problem with Infected Clothing Henry Knox Anthony Wayne The treaty negotiations have failed so Wayne is ordered to begin the campaign against the hostile Indians. There is a possibility that some of the clothing stores have been infected with yellow fever so the appropriate preventive measures will be taken before the clothes are transported.
January 19, 1795 Speech to the Sachams, Chiefs & Warriors of the Chipawas, Ottawas, Putawatimes Anthony Wayne [not available] Wayne commends the interest in peace on the part of the Indian tribes. He reminds them of the call for an exchange of American prisoners held by the tribes for Indian prisoners held by the US. Negotiations result in arrangements for a treaty meeting at Greenville in June.
[not available] Request for certificates Mrs. Sarah Brown Samuel Hodgdon Asks that Hodgdon send certificates.
January 18, 1794 Indian Flag of Truce, and Suspicions Thereof Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Wayne Informs Knox that the Indians have sent in a flag of truce, which he believes is due to the seizure of St. Clair's field and the approach to Grand Glaize. Doubts the overture is sincere, believing the Indians may just be stalling for time to remove their women and children, store winter provisions, and scout Wayne's camp -- but accepts the necessity of losing this opportunity for a quick...
January 30, 1799 Certification of payments; Phoebe Shannon, matron to hospital Fort Norfolk, Virginia William Simmons James McHenry Certification of payments; $112 to Phoebe Shannon, matron to hospital Fort Norfolk, Virginia for her pay.
June 10, 1795 Account of Mary Weed for subsisting deserters William Simmons Timothy Pickering Simmons certifies that the sum of $35.67 is due Mary Weed, being the amount of her account for subsisting sundry deserters from the Army in the jail at Philadelphia Pennsylvania.