Viewing 1–25 of 430 documents: "vessel"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 3, 1796 Regarding Naval Shipments Josiah Fox Forman Cheesman Letter, discusses cargo and vessel.
April 25, 1798 Request to examine vessel "Two Friends" for fitness as vessel of war [not available] Joshua Humphreys Request to examine vessel "Two Friends" for fitness as vessel of war. Examine mast, rigging; determine number of guns she can carry. State the alterations, repairs and articles required to fill her up.
October 12, 1791 Regarding a Vessel Henry Knox Don Joseph de Jaudenes Knox inquires after a vessel, possibly bound to South America.
December 9, 1799 Vessel Needed for Crossing the Lake John Laughton Alexander Hamilton Laughton informs Hamilton that he has found a vessel that would able to make the dangerous lake-crossing and asks permission to have one built for this purpose.
April 28, 1798 Regarding the vessel Ganges and her fitness as a war ship [not available] [not available] Gentlemen are asked to find out about the vessel Ganges and her fitness as a war ship. Inquire into state of sails, rigging, value of the vessel and number of guns capable of carrying.
June 27, 1798 Entitling the Vessel to Her Freight Samuel Hodgdon Samuel Eddins Capt. Eddins is asked to confirm that the articles sent to him match what is listed on the invoice and bill of lading so that the vessel will be entited to her freight.
September 6, 1794 Transporting Spars for the Frigate Henry Knox Tench Francis Knox reports on his efforts to transport the spars for the frigate. He is trying to hire a vessel to transport them but is disappointed in the exorbitant price asked by the vessel's owner.
April 23, 1798 Inquiry into purchase of vessel "American" belonging to Henry Phillips merchant [not available] Henry Phillips Offer made by the War Office to buy the merchant vessel "America." The "America" is owned by Henry Phillips and is capable of being moulded with 6 or 9 pounders. Asks for the lowest price and a description of the vessel stores.
September 11, 1793 Swedish Neutral Vessel Henry Knox Thomas Jefferson Knox argues that the Swedish neutral vessel brought into U.S. ports before August 5th is not included in the rule to restore vessels taken by privateers after that period. The appeal to the Circut Court should be prosecuted and if the ruling is unfavorable, then it might be proper to interfere by force if the President so declares.
December 9, 1794 Captured British vessel by the French Edmund Randolph [not available] The Secretary of State requests the opinion of fellow Cabinet members regarding the enclosed letter of George Hammond, regarding the 1793 capture of a British vessel ("William Tell") taken by an armed French vessel not far from U.S. shores, and brought to New York. Randolph asks whether or not the United States government is bound to urge the payment requested for damages from the French.
May 24, 1796 Sailing of the Vessel that Takes the Forge Nathan Jones Samuel Hodgdon The Secretary of War notes that Hodgdon's letter will answer whether the vessel transporting the forge will sail on Thursday or Friday.
December 12, 1799 Fitness of Captl Laughton for Managing a Vessel John Jacob Rivardi Alexander Hamilton Rivardi expresses his opinion that he considers Capt. Laughton too old and infirm for the fatiguing management of a vessel on the lakes.
October 21, 1794 Announces Departure of Vessel for Island of St. Simon; Potential to Deliver Articles Tench Coxe Henry Knox Announces departure of vessel for the Island of St. Simon with the potential to deliver anything for the War Department.
July 30, 1793 Request for Report on Ship Repairs Henry Knox [not available] Orders to ascertain information on repairs made to British ship now in port of Philadelphia, to determine whether it is being fitted as a merchant vessel or a vessel of war. The ship is identified as a Letter of Marque ship.
August 25, 1794 Vessel belonging to the British Consul Henry Knox Henry Lee Secretary Knox writes the Governor of Virginia on the subject of the vessel belonging to the British Consul, and taken possession of by General Matthews.
August 16, 1793 Asylum Henry Knox Governor Edward Telfair Presidential decision not to grant asylum to any armed vessel or privateer. Requests Governor's assistance in enforcing this new mandate.
April 1, 1800 Procuring a Vessel Bound for New Orleans Ebenezer Stevens Samuel Hodgdon There is only one vessel that may proceed to New Orleans but her owners are waiting on the decision of Congress relative to the drawback on goods. Several vessels will sail for Havanna soon so if Hodgdon's friend is agreeable, Stevens can arrange for accomodations on one of them. Gordon hopes that Simmons will soon make a remittance of clothing since he pressed for money.
August 7, 1797 Passage on a Vessel Bound for Norfolk James McHenry Samuel Hodgdon William Barnwell has been appointed a Surgeon's Mate so he will need passage on board a vessel bound for Norfolk in Virginia where he will be stationed.
September 15, 1799 Sending a Vessel to the Isle of France Richard Caton James McHenry Not knowing Mr. Pickering, Caton solicits McHenry's assistance in obtaining a permit to send a vessel to "the Isle of France."
April 7, 1796 Queries about Shipment of Clothing to Georgia Nathan Jones Samuel Hodgdon Refers to clothing sent to Georgia by the Secretary of War back in December. Wants to know on what vessel it was shipped and whether they have heard of its arrival. Has not arrived at ultimate destination by 8 March.
June 17, 1793 Seizure of a French Vessel Henry Knox Unknown Recipient Citizen Genet has written the Secretary of State on the subject of the seizure of a French vessel by the Governor of New York (George Clinton) because it was armed and manned and prepared to prey on the enemies of France. It is Secretary Knox's opinion that French privateers should be required to depart to the dominions of their own sovereign. Document is highly illegible.
June 23, 1798 Powder and Cannon to Philadelphia John Bryant Samuel Hodgdon The barrels of powder were shipped on a vessel that sailed on Saturday. The vessel with the three-pounders and six-pounders will sail for Philadelphia immediately and be delivered to Mr. Harris. Enclosed is the captain's receipts for the pieces and carriages.
April 2, 1794 Cabinet meeting on a passport request [not available] Unknown Recipient Washington's Cabinet gives the opinion that a passport ought to be granted for a particular vessel in question, with appropriate restrictions.
May 15, 1798 Cannons & Carriage to be Shipped on the First Vessel George Fleming Samuel Hodgdon Enclosed is a return of the cannons and carriage to be shipped on board the first vessel that is suitable to take them. Since they are not yet on board, it is not possible to forward the receipts signed by the master of the sloop. The wheels being sent are partly ironed.
May 9, 1794 Injury to a Private Vessel by Unauthorizede Persons Alexander Hamilton George Hammond Hamilton discusses a case in which a private vessel, engaged by the British Consul at Norfolk, has been damaged by unauthorized persons. This constitutes a private trespass which must be redressed through the ordinary course of law.