Viewing 1–25 of 1,085 documents: "string of white wampum"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
May 27, 1793 Request for White Wampum Timothy Pickering Henry Knox On behalf of commissioners, Pickering laments that the white wampum has not arrived from New York or Albany. Therefore, ask Major Craig's help in obtaining a quantity, not exceeding 80,000.
January 1, 1795 Formal Peace Alliance with Tribes at Sandusky Anthony Wayne Sachems Formal acceptance of U.S. to discuss peace with tribes of Sandusky. Hopes to create an alliance against those who caused mischief.
August 5, 1800 Promises and Land Rights Arthur St. Clair Chiefs of the Chickasaw Nation Promises made in Philadelphia by Sec of War to be kept. Currently searching for an agent through whom the Indians can communicate to the U.S. Government. Land rights addressed.
May 26, 1793 Obtaining White Wampum Benjamin Lincoln Henry Knox "Not having obtained any white wampum, either at New York or Albany, we have desired Major Craig to procure any quantity , not exceeding 80,000, at Pittsburgh; should he procure it, he will transmit you the account thereof, which we request you to pay at five days' sight hereof."
October 28, 1794 Friendly meeting with James Davidson, Indian chief John McKee William Blount Letter to Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory on a talk with James Davidson, a "distinguished chief from the valleys," with about 450 of his people. Davidson gave him a string of beads, mixed black and white - the white beads representing his people's friendship and alliance with the United States; the black beads representing animosity to the Creek Indians.
May 27, 1793 Request for white wampum and qualified Delaware and Shawanese interpreters Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Isaac Craig Federal commissioners advise Major Craig they have dispatched Six Nations interpreter Jasper Parrish to Philadelphia to procure white wampum. They ask Craig to dispatch 40 to 50,000 white wampum. They reiterate request for Delaware and Shawanese interpreters to support the Treaty at Sandusky Ohio.
May 26, 1793 Letter from Federal Commissioners Sandusky Treaty requesting interpreters and white wampum [money] Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Isaac Craig From Niagara, Commissioners have no information on whereabouts of William Wilson or James Rankin, interpreters for Delaware and Shawanese languages; and inquire on whereabouts of white wampum. They write to Major Craig at Pittsburg noting that it is of highest importance that they have their interpreters. Ask Craig to urge Wilson to come. If Rankin cannot come, find another competently skilled in...
May 26, 1793 Request for White Wampum & Interpreters for Treaty at Sandusky Ohio Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky General John Gibson Six Nations interpreter Jasper Parish carries a letter from Federal commissioners for Treaty at Sandusky which attempts to enlist General Gibson's support as an Indian expert in obtaining white wampum and qualified interpreters for the Delaware and Shawanese languages. Major Craig at Pittsburg identified at the point of contact. Interpreters were supposed to travel with commissioners, but did not...
May 7, 1793 Four Strings of Wampum John Stagg Samuel Hodgdon Stagg wants four strings of wampum in addition to the number furnished that morning.
May 27, 1793 Tardy interpreters, arrival of Benjamin Lincoln, overdue wampum, and concern over potential troop movements of General Wayne Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Henry Knox Commissioners report that General Lincoln arrived on 25 May with stores in the batteaux. No interpreters as of yet; nor is there any white wampum. Duplicate letter enclosed from Colonel McKee. The delay of proceedings provides time to obtain interpreters and white wampum. If the white wampum does not arrive in time, will borrow from British agents at Niagara or Detroit. Send the wampum to Major...
January 9, 1795 Recommendation for Peace Treaty to be Signed by the Sachams and War Chiefs of Sandusky Anthony Wayne [not available] Promises of peace by war chiefs of Sandusky and the U.S. military. Promises of protection by U.S. for Indian Nations who act peacefully but are attacked by hostile nations or settlers. Enclosed letter from Lord Dorchester, Governor of Canada.
May 26, 1793 Instructions to Get Two Guides and Proceed with Letters to Pittsburg Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Jasper Parrish Commissioners instruct interpreter Jasper Parrish to proceed to Pittsburg with two trusty Indians from Cornplanter's settlement, obtain more interpreters for treaty negotiations at Sandusky, and procure more white wampum. If Major Craig does not respond in timely fashion, apply to General John Gibson, who will expedite the effort. Commissioners plan to embark for Sandusky on 20 June 1793
May 19, 1796 Goods to the Indians, Etc. James McHenry James Wilkinson A list of matters to be addressed from the Secretary of War to General Wilkinson.
January 17, 1792 Conference of the Chiefs of the Cherokee Nation with the Secretary of War Henry Knox [not available] [A journal of a Conference of the Chiefs of the Cherokee Nation with the Secretary of War.] This is the transcript of Knox's meeting with the Cherokee chiefs who came to Philadelphia with a series of demands, particularly regarding white intruders in their territory and increased annuities for ceded lands.
May 15, 1787 We Are For Peace Speaker of the Seneca Tribes Unknown Recipient A spokesman for the Seneca tribes expresses his desire for peace which requires the Headmen of both the Indians and Whites to control the hostile actions of their young men.
July 24, 1792 Letter to the Wyachtenos and other tribes living on the Wabash River Rufus Putnam [not available] "Brothers: I am on my way to you from the great council fire of the United States, where the great and good chief, General Washington, resides. I am coming with the wishes of his heart to you which are very good, and which I hope will make your heart rejoice, when you hear them. Brothers: Out of love to you I am come this long way. I wish you to become a happy people; and, believe me, nothing...
May 22, 1792 Putnam's Receipt for Indian Goods Rufus Putnam [not available] A receipt signed by General Putnam for the Indian goods he received.
April 29, 1793 Wampum for Indian Department John Stagg Samuel Hodgdon Hodgdon is directed to inform the Secretary of War what quantity of wampum for the Indian Department he has in his possession.
August 15, 1799 Management of Indian Relations in Western Territories James McHenry Arthur St. Clair Orders on how to interact with Indians that respect the treaty signed regarding borders and hunting grounds. Protocol of an Indian Agent outlined.
February 1, 1795 [Copy of James Davidson's talk to John McKee delivered by runner] [not available] [not available] Scalp taken reasons for Indian warfare and killing. Requests opinion of United States on his actions. Noted council being held by Indian chiefs and warriors. Assured recipient (possibly Gov. Blount) of loyalty to United States.
December 2, 1796 Transcript of Talks Between Different Indian Chiefs & Secretary of War on Necessity of Peace Between Tribes James McHenry [not available] McHenry, on behalf of President Washington, advises all the Indians assembled to not go to war with each other. The representatives of the tribes then comment on this advice and on peace-making among themselves; the loss of land, the fate of Indian prisoners held by other tribes, and the shared use of hunting grounds are discussed. Much is made of the union of all the Indian nations as...
March 9, 1793 Dealings with Cornplanter Henry Knox Anthony Wayne As stated earlier, the Cornplanter is no longer needed in Philadelphia because the Farmer's brother and others have provided the necessary information. It is unfortunate that rumors have spread that the Cornplanter is estranged from us when the truth is that he angered his brethren when he visited us without their permission.
June 7, 1793 Enclosed List of Sundry Articles, Indian Relations Isaac Craig Henry Knox Enclosed list of sundry articles that must be purchase along with letter from Quartermaster General specifying the need to purchase items. Mentioned Seneca Indians at Niagara, desire for for treaty.
July 20, 1792 Lasting Peace with the Wabash Indians Rufus Putnam Wea Indians Putnam replies to the speech of the Wea Indians. He reaffirms the brotherhood between him and the Indians and says that while brothers may differ they can eventually unite again. Putnam gives his assurances that the women and children of the Wea will be protected and he will make arrangements to travel to the O. post for the meeting with all the tribes occupying land around the Wabash. He will...
November 16, 1792 It is our desire for your people to lay down their arms. [not available] [not available] Representatives of the Six Nations report on their mission to the Westward Indians to get them to agree to a peaceful settlement.