Viewing 1–25 of 277 documents: "stocks"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
March 14, 1798 Urgent Need for Gun Stocks David Ames Samuel Hodgdon Ames repeats his request for gun stocks asserting that without a new supply, either stocking must soon stop or he will be forced to produce stocks that are not fit for service. He does not know what to do since the stocks that he has on hand are not seasoned and therefore not fit for use. The river is not yet open so if a hundred stocks could be sent to New Haven they would last until Hodgdon...
May 15, 1797 Delivery of Musket Stocks James McHenry John Harris Orders to deliver 1000 musket stocks to Springfield.
January 10, 1799 Report on Manufacture and Store of Black Walnut Musket Stocks Samuel Hodgdon Edward Jones Reports the store's 3,288 black walnut musket stocks, and they should be receiving 1,000 every three weeks according to outstanding contracts, until by the end of April they should have 8,288 + stocks, with very few deductions to be used to supply national armories. They will not all be completely seasoned at that time. It will be easy to receive 1,000 stocks every 8 days. While he has no power...
June 19, 1799 Request for Musket Stocks Samuel Hodgdon James McHenry Col. Joseph Williams has requested a supply of musket stocks. Suggests using the best seasoned stocks first, with the remaining to be used as needed.
November 2, 1799 Request to deliver gun stocks Samuel Hodgdon John Harris Letter, directs delivery of thirteen hundred best seasoned black walnut musket stocks for use of Kingsley and Perkins, contractors for furnishing the United States with muskets at Bridgewater, Massachusetts.
September 7, 1798 Request for Issue of Gun Stocks to Springfield Armory James McHenry John Harris Letter, directs shipment of 3,000 gun stocks to armory Springfield, Mass.
August 5, 1799 Delivery of Gun Stocks James McHenry John Harris Orders to deliver 3000 gun stocks to Springfield.
October 17, 1798 Stocks On Hand & On Order Samuel Hodgdon Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Hodgdon discusses the supply and disposition of musket stocks.
October 29, 1799 Regarding Wolcott request for musket stocks Samuel Hodgdon John Harris Harris directed to put 1000 gun stocks on board Captain Dunn on 28 October. Mr. Nicholson will attend to delivery.
April 19, 1799 Reports Efforts to Procure Musket Stocks Samuel Hodgdon Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Reports delivery of musket stocks to Robert McCormick. It is too difficult to know the total number on hand in store. Refers to stocks at Harper's Ferry and Springfield. Hodgdon has no agency nor contract but has done all in his power to procure stocks.
May 1, 1798 Providing Stocks Fit for Use David Ames Samuel Hodgdon The deficiency in the return of the work done at the Springfield armory during April is due to the lack of stocks fit for use. Whoever is charged with forwarding the stocks should do so with the greatest haste. The chest of arms to be forwarded to Mr. Harris was shipped from New York so it should have already arrived.
January 11, 1799 Requests Information about Contracted Musket Stocks Samuel Hodgdon Tench Francis Secretary of War wants to know arrangements for procuring seasoned musket stocks: present state of contracts, number in the public store, which ones have been ordered by him.
June 20, 1799 Reports Delivery of Musket Stocks Samuel Hodgdon Joseph Williams Refers to order of musket stocks sent at the earliest convenience. Hopes the business at hand thrives and that the examination of the manufacture passes successfully.
October 28, 1799 Autograph Letter Signed [not available] [not available] Letter, directs shipment of musket stocks today.
May 11, 1799 Statement of Gun Stocks Delivered to Philadelphia Timothy Banger Oliver Wolcott, Jr. As per requested, includes list of gun stocks delivered to Philadelphia by order of the Secretary of the Treasury.
November 23, 1798 Forwarding of Gun Stocks Samuel Hodgdon Jonathan Jackson Given the advancement of the season, Hodgdon believes it is necessary for Jackson to pay the freight on the shipment of gun stocks to his address.
June 22, 1799 Employment in Cutting Musket Stocks Frederick Wolbert Samuel Hodgdon John Sutton has been employed in cutting musket stocks and Wolbert contends that it would be an act of charity to continue to employ him. He is a discerning and industrious man and has a large family. He and his friend Clay should be told where to apply for a contract to supply a certain amount of stocks.
October 11, 1798 Musket Stocks to Springfield Samuel Hodgdon Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Hodgdon discusses the process and cost of transporting three thousand musket stocks to Springfield.
May 11, 1799 Statement of Gun Stocks Delivered to Philadelphia Timothy Banger Oliver Wolcott, Jr. List includes date delivered, to whom the supply was addressed, and number of gun stocks.
August 10, 1798 Request for Issue of Musket Stocks to Eli Whitney Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Samuel Hodgdon Letter, directs provision of 4,000 musket stocks to Eli Whitney.
November 14, 1798 Musket stocks on hand John Harris Samuel Hodgdon Informs Hodgdon that there are 5,269 musket stocks on hand.
June 12, 1798 Contracts for Supplying Gun Stocks Samuel Hodgdon Eli Whitney Hodgdon informs Whitney of possible contracts related to the supply of gun stocks for public use.
October 28, 1799 Request for musket stocks Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Samuel Hodgdon Letter, asks for delivery of one thousand seasoned black walnut musket stocks to be delivered to Frederick Falley, contractor for fabricating muskets for the United States at Montgomery, Massachusetts.
June 14, 1799 Pressing Call for Musket Stocks Joseph Williams Samuel Hodgdon The Superintendent of the Armory has a pressing need for musket stocks. Williams is worried that the workers will stand idle for want of these articles if they are not forwarded immediately. In their rough state many of the musket stocks on hand have the appearance of soundness but when worked down are found to be shakey and unfit for muskets.
March 15, 1798 Price of Stocks Fit for Military Guns, Etc. Joseph Cranch Samuel Hodgdon A thousand gun stocks have been received by Captain Fleming. Before work is done on any of them it will be necessary to determine the price of those fit for stocking military guns. In 1793 Cranch was charged twenty cents each for 1284 stocks. Bayonets and ramrods should be sent on so that they can be fitted to the guns as soon as they are stocked or repaired.