Viewing 1–25 of 36 documents: "prison"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
May 3, 1800 Debtors Prison Samuel Lewis James McHenry Former clerk of the War Department, Samuel Lewis, writes from debtor prison to James McHenry. Lewis sadly reflects on his current state, asserts that he will likely die in prison, and mourns the fact that he will leave his "tender wife" and "helpless children" behind. Expresses his hope that Congress might release him from confinement if he repays in installments. Requests from McHenry payment...
March 27, 1800 Certification of payment; Philadelphia prison for subsistence of Morris Gerry, deserter from the Army of the United States to Philip Edwards, prison keeper William Simmons James McHenry Certification of payment; $8.50 to Philadelphia prison for subsistence of Morris Gerry, deserter from the Army of the United States and confined at Fort Mifflin, to Philip Edwards, prison keeper.
September 5, 1795 Confirms receipt of pay and muster rolls William Simmons Charles Martin Confirms receipt of a letter from Ensign Charles Martin that contained receipt, pay, and muster rolls. Also informs Martin that soldiers in prison are to receive no pay.
October 24, 1796 Liberty for Prisoner John Winans John A. Winans William Simmons John Winans, incarcerated at New Prison, beseeches Simmons to review his case in the fervent hope that he may be deemed worthy of being granted his liberty.
April 15, 1799 Troop conditions in Portland Amos Stoddard Samuel Hodgdon Writes that he understands that his troops stationed in Portland have been authorized to receive a greater quantity of clothing than what is annually allowed to them by law. Reiterates the absolute necessity for tents - states that "our Blockhouse or Barrack is more like a loathsome prison than a wholesome habitation." Insists that conditions must improve in order to prevent "contagious...
October 24, 1796 Liberty for Prisoner John Winans John A. Winans William Simmons Winans, incarcerated at New Prison, begs Simmons to consider reviewing his case so that he might be granted his liberty.
December 27, 1800 Certification of payment; estate of Richard Mason, for boarding in prison James Douglas, deserter, from Lieutenant Harris’ detachment, 2d Regiment Artillerists and Engineers William Simmons Samuel Dexter Certification of payment; $45.40 to estate of Richard Mason, for boarding in prison James Douglas, deserter, from Lieutenant Harris’ detachment, 2d Regiment Artillerists and Engineers
May 10, 1792 Account of John Mullins Joseph Howell Richard Harrison Account of John Mullins, private in the late 10th Virginia Regiment.
December 27, 1800 Certification of payment; David Kennedy, a reward for apprehending and committing to prison James Douglas and M. Stanford, deserters from Artillerists and Engineers William Simmons Samuel Dexter Certification of payment; $20 to David Kennedy, a reward for apprehending and committing to prison James Douglas and M. Stanford, deserters from Artillerists and Engineers.
November 24, 1795 Poor Conditions at Fort Johnson Timothy Pickering Daniel De Saussure Request for supplies to repair barracks and prison quarters at Fort Johnson. Captain Kalteisen to oversee building.
November 1, 1799 Patterns Stolen by Aron Brodie Who Is Now Being Carried to Prison David Ames Samuel Hodgdon Ames discusses the theft of arms from the factory and their recovery in the chest of Aron Brodie along with other articles taken from the works. Brodie is be escorted to prison by an officer and will be duly punished for his villainy.
May 23, 1797 Statement of Iserloan Casper Iserloan [not available] Testimony in Commonwealth v Christian Hubbard and John Shannon
[not available] Liberty for Debtor Casper Islerloan Casper Iserloan William Simmons Iserloan entreats Simmons to secure his liberty from debtors' prison so he can legally participate in the land lottery.
May 13, 1798 Joseph Webb's Claims Jeremiah Wadsworth William Simmons Joseph Webb, now in prison, claims that several vessels on the Charles were taken for government use and he never received anything for them or their charter. Wadswworth asks Simmons to send him copies of Webb's accounts and vouchers so this matter can be resolved.
April 20, 1798 One Misfortune After Another Jeremiah Fisher Samuel Hodgdon Fisher begs Hodgdon for assistance. After recovering from a severe case of rheumatism, he now finds himself afflicted with another form of misfortune. The strict hand of justice has called on him for money and he finds himself imprisoned in his own home. If he is not able to pay by Monday, he will be sent to a real prison.
[not available] Regarding the actions of Rawlings and his men at the siege of Fort Washington Colonel Moses Rawlings Henry Knox Regarding his denied claim for warrant for military bounty land, Rawling recounts the actions of himself, and his officers and men during the siege of Fort Washington during American Revolution. Of the 274 men in his Regiment, 52 officers and soldiers were killed or wounded. Says that Gordon's History of America reports that Rawling's regiment killed or wounded upwards of 600 men. Rawlings was...
April 28, 1799 Recommends Mr. Bureau de Pusy William Vans Murray James McHenry Recommends Mr. Bureau de Pusy as a gentleman of great value, friend and prison-mate of the Marquis de Lafayette. Requests attention and protection.
August 24, 1800 Private Conference with Merchants, Etc. Benjamin Hodgdon Samuel Hodgdon Benjamin has arrived safely in Alexandria and visited a third party in jail. Relates to a vessel and business. However, no one can now talk to the imprisoned man without the jailer being present.
January 14, 1794 Release of Lafayette from Prussian prison Cabinet Unknown Recipient Cabinet meeting concerning the writing to the King of Prussia, Frederick William II, regarding the Marquis de Lafayette, currently imprisoned by the former. President Washington is pondering writing the King in a private and unofficial manner about releasing Lafayette on parole, given Lafayette's immense services to the United States during the Revolution.
February 25, 1791 Petition of Robert Connelly Henry Knox [not available] Responding to the claim of Robert Connelly that he deserves a pension because he was blinded during his period of service to the United States, Knox refuses the claim observing that there is no evidence that his blindness occurred while he was serving his country.
December 10, 1789 Hickburn seeks a loan from Knox Joseph D Hickburn Henry Knox Letter, asks for pay advance.
January 23, 1800 Making Terms With Deserters and Double Rations Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Alexander Hamilton Pinckney expressed his determination in not making terms with deserters until they deliver themselves up. Letter noted, "there are currently three skulking on the Allegheney Mountain" who contacted him but he would do nothing until they come in. Enclosed letter from Freeman which pertained to double rations.
September 13, 1799 Requests Assistance with Prison Guards at Morris Town Benjamin Stoddert James McHenry Encloses letter from Major Burrows. The Marine Corps cannot furnish the requested guard for sixty prisoners at Morris Town. Requests that the Harper's Ferry guard be relieved to assist in Morris Town.
March 10, 1800 Keeping Col. Smith Out of Jail Alexander Hamilton William Burrows Hamilton applauds Burrows for not forcing the issue on Col. Smith's debt to the extent that he would have gone to jail, which would have ruined Smith. Hamilton seconds Col. Troup's advice to use anonymous names for the bail of Smith.
April 17, 1794 Detainment by French Henry Knox Henry Lee Status of detainees reported as settled between Sec. of State and British Minister.