Viewing 1–25 of 1,370 documents: "pipe of peace"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 5, 1792 [Speech of John Heckewelder to the Delware chiefs and captains, Walendauwechen, Pachgantschihillas, Muchingwe, Pushees, and Captain Pipe.] John Heckenwelder [not available] Assurances of truth and peace. Offer to meet at the mouth of the Muskingum to talk out peace.
1792 Brighten the Chain of Friendship Rufus Putnam [not available] Putnam invites the chiefs of the western tribes to travel to Philadelphia, at government expense, to attempt to reach a settlement that will avoid war between them and the United States.
April 19, 1795 [The speech of a Chief called the Sun, in behalf of the Putawatimes] The Sun [not available] The Sun speaks on behalf of Pottawatomies, Chippewas, and Taways. Admits foolishness in trusting British. Severed ties with British and French to pursue peace with Americans. Hopes to hunt in peace, pity for women and children, prisoner exchange, and that the U.S. will provide food. The Sun avowed to move his village in exchange for powder and ball to use for hunting.
July 31, 1799 Retail List of Brass Mounting; Instructions for Gunsmiths Samuel Hodgdon Joseph Cranch Retail list of brass mounting. Requests that he redirect items as directed by the Secretary of War. Reports allowance of gunsmiths.
May 15, 1787 We Are For Peace Speaker of the Seneca Tribes Unknown Recipient A spokesman for the Seneca tribes expresses his desire for peace which requires the Headmen of both the Indians and Whites to control the hostile actions of their young men.
May 10, 1800 Request for stationary and greetings from Little Turkey and Bloodyfellow John Hooker David Henley Articles drawn from Secretary of War must be fixed at some rate. Requests prices to articles listed: quills, glass, putty, paper. Requests bill for brandy given. Requests writing paper. Little Turkey and Bloodyfellow have missed Henley twice and by way of an apology ask for tobacco so they may smoke the pipe of friendship from a distance.
June 4, 1791 Sons of War Let Loose Against You! Charles Scott Nations of Red People on the Wabash River General Scott warns the Indians of the violence that will be unleashed against them if they persist in their depredations against the United States.
May 28, 1792 Cowetas Not Responsible for the Murder James Durouzeaux James Seagrove Durouzeaux informs Seagrove that the Cowetas were not responsible for the recent murder. General McGillivray has gone to New Orleans so the headmen of the Coweta and Cussetah will come to Rock Landing to talk peace with Seagrove.
September 29, 1792 Speech to the Wabash and Illinois tribes Rufus Putnam Chiefs of Wabash and Illinois Tribes Speech to the Wabash and Illinois tribes, following a treaty, by General Rufus Putnam. Discusses opening communication with other tribes, including the Miami, Delaware, Shawnee and Wyandot. Also mentions a visit of selected chiefs to Philadelphia.
April 18, 1793 We All Wish for Peace John Watts William Blount Even though Noon-day was a good man, Watts does not want his murder by whites to interfere with the prospects for peace between the Cherokees and the United States.
November 16, 1792 It is our desire for your people to lay down their arms. [not available] [not available] Representatives of the Six Nations report on their mission to the Westward Indians to get them to agree to a peaceful settlement.
September 26, 1789 Talk of the White Bird King to US commissioners [not available] [not available] Pays compliments to the US Commissioners, but says the Creeks have been at the river for a long time and have become tired. Hunting time is coming soon. Hopes that the whites behave and do not steal the Creek's horses. Says that although nothing to be done about the treaty, hopes it may be done hereafter. Then the Cussetah King arose and lighted a pipe and presented it to the commissioners. The...
September 13, 1791 Transportation of Troops, Stores Samuel Hodgdon Isaac Craig Description of what companies arrived and when. Boats unloaded, stores present did not match invoice. Mentioned arrival of Kickapoo chiefs, visiting their wives who are held prisoner. Troops to advance tomorrow.
April 11, 1793 Creeks Never at Peace with Cumberland John Watts William Blount Watts, of the Cherokee Nation, affirms his credibility in warning of the warlike intentions of the Creek Nation against the Cumberland settlements.
November 4, 1794 Peace with the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Wyandot Chief Major General Anthony Wayne delivers speech to the Wyandots, who have pleaded for peace. Wayne states, "I hope and trust that your eyes are now opened." Urges that a "permanent and lasting peace" may be established upon establishing a just boundary.
November 2, 1795 Preservation of Peace William Blount Timothy Pickering Extract - notification that peace exists b/w Indian tribes and U.S., but is best preserved through strong military presence in frontier posts.
January 21, 1795 Agreement to Meet in Greenville to Discuss Peace Anthony Wayne [not available] Article: Confirmation of cease in hostilities between the Sachums and War Chiefs and the United States, attendance to meeting in Greenville to discuss peace and finalize peace treaty.
August 13, 1796 Peace on Frontier James McHenry John Sever Views of Sevier in line with those proposed by Congress and the President for seeking peace among the frontier inhabitants. Mentions militia.
June 10, 1795 Pursuit of Peace by Indians John Foster Williams Anthony Wayne Williams advised Wayne that the emergency at hand should not have been ignored and caused the Indians to assume mischief. Letter from Wayne received and explained to the Council as best as possible by Williams for understanding of United States desire for peace. Indians enthusiastically pursue peace and have sent "bad people" from town.
November 8, 1794 Conference with Cherokee leadership William Blount [not available] Conference between Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory, and several Cherokee representatives: Colonel John Watts of a Lower Cherokee town (Will's town), and Scolacutta (aka, Hanging Maw), along with other Cherokee chiefs. Also present were 400 warriors and several citizens of the United States. Briefly discuss the illegal destruction by Major Ore of the friendly Lower Cherokee towns...
April 4, 1792 Speech to the Indians on Peace Henry Knox [not available] Additional attempt at peace after the failure of Colonel Proctors mission for peace last year. President requests presence of chiefs in Philadelphia to discuss peace.
November 30, 1793 Peace and Understanding Re-established James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Seagrove notifies Governor Telfair of the re-establishment of peace and friendship with the Creek nation which includes the understanding that all prisoners and stolen property will be returned. He wants the Governor to waste no time in promulgating this welcome news to prevent outrages from being committed against the Indians which would endanger the fragile peace.
March 10, 1789 Meeting Arrangements for Another Peace Treaty Chiefs & Warriors of the Cherokee Nation Governor Samuel Johnston Chiefs of the Chicomogies in the Cherokee Nation sought to arrange a peace treaty meeting with U.S.
May 22, 1790 Fragment - Events After Gamelin Left Villages John Francis Hamtramck Arthur St. Clair Indians went to war shortly after Gamelin left Indian villages during his tour to seek peace with Indian tribes.
1794 Peace with Northwest Indians Anthony Wayne Unknown Recipient Report of the articles agreed upon by General Anthony Wayne and the sachems and war chiefs of the Chippewas, Pattawatamies, Sacs, and Miamies. It has been agreed that a "permanent peace" be accomplished, with a cessation of all hostilities. The United States will retaliate if the peace is broken.