Viewing 1–25 of 1,350 documents: "peace"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
April 18, 1793 We All Wish for Peace John Watts William Blount Even though Noon-day was a good man, Watts does not want his murder by whites to interfere with the prospects for peace between the Cherokees and the United States.
April 11, 1793 Creeks Never at Peace with Cumberland John Watts William Blount Watts, of the Cherokee Nation, affirms his credibility in warning of the warlike intentions of the Creek Nation against the Cumberland settlements.
November 4, 1794 Peace with the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Wyandot Chief Major General Anthony Wayne delivers speech to the Wyandots, who have pleaded for peace. Wayne states, "I hope and trust that your eyes are now opened." Urges that a "permanent and lasting peace" may be established upon establishing a just boundary.
November 2, 1795 Preservation of Peace William Blount Timothy Pickering Extract - notification that peace exists b/w Indian tribes and U.S., but is best preserved through strong military presence in frontier posts.
January 21, 1795 Agreement to Meet in Greenville to Discuss Peace Anthony Wayne [not available] Article: Confirmation of cease in hostilities between the Sachums and War Chiefs and the United States, attendance to meeting in Greenville to discuss peace and finalize peace treaty.
August 13, 1796 Peace on Frontier James McHenry John Sever Views of Sevier in line with those proposed by Congress and the President for seeking peace among the frontier inhabitants. Mentions militia.
June 10, 1795 Pursuit of Peace by Indians John Foster Williams Anthony Wayne Williams advised Wayne that the emergency at hand should not have been ignored and caused the Indians to assume mischief. Letter from Wayne received and explained to the Council as best as possible by Williams for understanding of United States desire for peace. Indians enthusiastically pursue peace and have sent "bad people" from town.
April 4, 1792 Speech to the Indians on Peace Henry Knox [not available] Additional attempt at peace after the failure of Colonel Proctors mission for peace last year. President requests presence of chiefs in Philadelphia to discuss peace.
March 10, 1789 Meeting Arrangements for Another Peace Treaty Chiefs & Warriors of the Cherokee Nation Governor Samuel Johnston Chiefs of the Chicomogies in the Cherokee Nation sought to arrange a peace treaty meeting with U.S.
November 30, 1793 Peace and Understanding Re-established James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Seagrove notifies Governor Telfair of the re-establishment of peace and friendship with the Creek nation which includes the understanding that all prisoners and stolen property will be returned. He wants the Governor to waste no time in promulgating this welcome news to prevent outrages from being committed against the Indians which would endanger the fragile peace.
May 22, 1790 Fragment - Events After Gamelin Left Villages John Francis Hamtramck Arthur St. Clair Indians went to war shortly after Gamelin left Indian villages during his tour to seek peace with Indian tribes.
1794 Peace with Northwest Indians Anthony Wayne Unknown Recipient Report of the articles agreed upon by General Anthony Wayne and the sachems and war chiefs of the Chippewas, Pattawatamies, Sacs, and Miamies. It has been agreed that a "permanent peace" be accomplished, with a cessation of all hostilities. The United States will retaliate if the peace is broken.
December 16, 1796 Presidential Reply on Peace Sought with France George Washington House of Representatives Grateful for his ability to serve and the approval of Congress for his service. Pledged to preserve peace b/w U.S. and French republic.
February 21, 1795 Agreement to Peace Talks at Time Appointed by Indian Tribes John Williams [not available] Notification of acceptance to peace talks between several tribes and the United States. Notes on 22nd February the Wayandots, by Chief Middle Sky, signed the Preliminary Articles for peace.
May 23, 1793 Our Nation is Determined to be at Peace Chiefs of the Cherokees William Blount The Cherokee chiefs offer assurances that, unlike the Creeks, they seek peace with the United States. They do not want to be blamed for any of the Creek depredations.
June 5, 1788 Indians Seeking Peace Prince of Notoly Andrew Pickens Chota Indians left their towns and land so the Creeks and White People can fight among themselves.
August 20, 1792 Overtures of Peace with Indians James Wilkinson General Edward Hand Relayed rumors of peace, but any more mismanaged campaigns against Indians could be disastrous. Discussed current campaign against Indians and referenced a successes and failures with dates.
May 15, 1787 We Are For Peace Speaker of the Seneca Tribes Unknown Recipient A spokesman for the Seneca tribes expresses his desire for peace which requires the Headmen of both the Indians and Whites to control the hostile actions of their young men.
August 21, 1793 Seeking Peace with the Southern Tribes James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove reports that despite the suspicious machinations of the Spanish government and their agents McGillivray and Panton & Co., the Indians are quiet on the frontier. He hopes soon to enter the Creek nation to obtain justice for all injuries done and restore peace to the territory.
February 15, 1793 Chiccamagas Desire for Peace Henry Knox Henry Lee Indians desire peace, Governor Blount to call general council to discuss terms.
December 18, 1786 Speech of United Indian Nations to Congress Chiefs of Wabash and Illinois Tribes [not available] The Indians are disappointed that they were not included in peace accord with Great Britain; wanted lasting peace. Indians excluded from meetings held regarding peace and property rights, desire future peace be reached with a united voice of the confederacy.
April 5, 1793 Cumberland Settlers are for Peace Arthur Coody William Blount Coody believes that the Creek Indians are going to war against the Cumberland settlers who seek to convince the Indians that the white people want peace and if the Creeks want war it should be waged against Georgia. It appears also that Mr. McGillivray is dead.
March 25, 1795 Overtures of Peace Timothy Pickering Arthur St. Clair Pickering believed that the militia under Col. Sproat currently employed defending the Muskingum can be "dispensed with." Mentioned overtures of peace made by 6 Indian tribes to Gen. Wayne. It was stipulated in writing that both sides would suspend hostilities. Also addressed peace with Great Britain.
September 27, 1794 Plea for Peace John Williams Anthony Wayne This is a plea for peace after five years of war. It has been the misfortune of the peaceful Wyandots to have been displaced from their land during this period. This has left many of John Williams' countrymen in a state of despair and he will do all in his power to gain peace.
July 25, 1793 Account Adjustments and Peace with Cherokees Henry Knox Henry Lee Knox related troubles in obtaining account information from Virginia, problems with peace accord b/w U.S. and Cherokees.