Viewing 1–25 of 7,327 documents: "just means used to attack the wavering and to confirm the well disposed titles of indians in their friendship to the United States"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 24, 1791 Knox copies minutes from Washington's speech Henry Knox [not available] Document, minutes for the President's speech; discusses impartial justice for Indians; mentions system for national militia.
November 16, 1794 Closing remarks for the Conference between the Six Nations and the U.S. Timothy Pickering [not available] Document, Pickering issues a statement praising Chief Little Billy for making the conference productive.
May 3, 1797 Suspension of the Evacuation of These Posts Don Manuel Gayoso de Lemos Lieutenant Piercy Smith Pope Gayoso de Lemos assures Lieutenant Pope that political reasons require a minimal and temporary Spanish presence in United States territory and no disrespect is intended by the King of Spain.
November 22, 1792 Peace & Friendship with the United States James Seagrove Henry Knox After his meeting with eighteen Creek chiefs, Seagrove confirms that the Creeks have no interest in joining the northern tribes against the forces of the United States.
November 11, 1791 Ratification of the Treaty of Holston. George Washington [not available] This is the Instrument of Ratification of the Treaty of Holston as proclaimed by President George Washington with the advice and consent of the United States Senate.
January 22, 1795 Ratification of a Treaty of Peace and Friendship George Washington [not available] President Washington formally confirms the ratification of a Treaty of Peace and friendship concluded by Timothy Pickering at Canandagua the 11th day of November 1794 between the Six Nations of Indians and the United States.
July 13, 1788 Regarding provisions for Indians and attack by party of Indians Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Reports on attack by party of Indians. St. Clair notes that it cannot be determined whether this was a wanton act or deliberately committed to embarrass the Councils and obstruct a general peace. Discusses implications of war and questions good faith of Indians.
1792 Pleasing Proof of Your Strong Friendship William Blount Chiefs & Warrors of the Choctaw Nation Blount, Governor of the territory south of the Ohio River and Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southern District, assures the Choctaws of the friendship of the United States and encourages young Chocttaw warriors to join the impending campaign against the western Indians.
November 1796 On Breaking Alliance with British, and Establishing Friendship with United States Blue Jacket Chief of the Shawnees President of the United States Indian chief Blue Jacket, of the Shawnees, relates how he and his people once fought for the British, having been urged to do so by them; now cites deception by the British and wishes only friendship with the Americans. Submits a testimonial of friendship with the English king; now states that he will throw that one away in return for a similar document from the U.S. President.
December 29, 1790 The reply of the President of the United States to the speech of the Cornplanter, Half-Town, and Great-Tree, Chiefs and Councillors of the Seneca nation of Indians. George Washington [not available] Asks that his speech be kept in remembrance of the friendship of the United States. Asks that the miseries of the late war be forgotten. Acknowledges difficulties with sales of land; notes that General Government is only authority for such sales and treaties. Says that John Livingston was not legally authorized to treat; but no evidence that Oliver Phelps defrauded. Mentions the fatherly care...
April 13, 1792 Friendship of the United States with the Five Nations Timothy Pickering Sachems & Chiefs of the Five Nations (The speech of Timothy Pickering, commissioner, to the Sachems and Chiefs of the Five Nations.) Pickering assures the Sachems and Chiefs of the Five Nations of the friendship of the United States and its wish to treat with the Indians at Fort Washington, or any suitable location , to resolve issues related to disputed land.
May 30, 1800 Diplomatic relations with Little Turtle James McHenry Chief Little Turtle Secretary McHenry thanks Little Turtle for his friendship and hopes that Little Turtle will continue his friendship with his successor and the United States.
September 13, 1792 Token of Friendship William Blount Little Turkey Received letter from Little Turkey which Blount viewed as a sincere token of friendship with United States and of desire for peace. Blount stated that towns that did not declare war will be able to remain on their land in peace. Requests that hearty thanks be passed along to other chiefs.
June 20, 1791 Council Fire for Peace Captain Hendrick Aupaumut [not available] The Stockbridge Chief expresses his gratitude to Captain Aupaunot that they have been able to come together in friendship and peace.
[not available] Notes on Good Peter's Speech Good Peter [not available] In his speech Good Peter discusses White aggression and Indian aggression.
July 2, 1788 [Additional Instructions to the Governor of the Territory North West of the River Ohio relative to the Treaty to be Held with the Western Indians in Pursuance of the Resolutions passed by Congress of October Last] Charles Thomson Arthur St. Clair Additional directions to Governor directing him to secure an advantageous boundary for the United States using additional money provided.
July 14, 1791 Good Peter's Speech Good Peter [not available] In his speech, Good Peter discusses the strength of the United States, peace, cultivated lands, the civilizing of Indians, and Indian literacy.
February 10, 1792 Resolving Issues with the Senecas Henry Knox Seneca Chiefs Knox tells New-Arrow, Cornplanter, Big-Log, and other Seneca chiefs that he would like to meet with them in Philadelphia in order to resolve any issues that might stand in the way of friendship between the Senecas and the United States.
May 7, 1799 Updates on Negative Status of Northwest Territory David Strong Alexander Hamilton Supplies of ammunition and hospital stores low and no response to multiple communications to Secretary of War on the subject. Strong noted discontent held by Indians who he believed were planning an attack on the United States and Great Britain.
January 7, 1792 Continuing the War Against the Hostile Indians Henry Knox Cornplanter, Chief of the Senecas Knox, speaking for the President, assures the Cornplanter and the other friendly chiefs that the United States, despite past defeats, will continue the war against the hostile Indians and will afford their peoples whatever protection that it is in the power of the United States to provide.
February 17, 1792 Affection and Friendship for the Choctaw Nation Henry Knox Choctaw Nation of Indians Knox assures the Choctaws of the affection and friendship of General Washington for the Choctaw nation and enlists their aid in the campaign against the hostile Indians north of the Ohio.
March 17, 1797 Instructions for Escorting Indians to New Lands Oliver Wolcott, Jr. James McHenry According to instructions, Wolcott has written to the Surveyor General to determine the proper location for Indian relocation under the treaty with General Wayne of 3 August 1795. The Surveyor General will instruct General Wilkinson when and where to escort the Indians.
February 17, 1792 Love and Attachment to the Creek Nation Henry Knox Creek Nation of Indians Knox sends a message to the Creeks to reaffirm the friendship of President Washington for the southern Indians and to warn them of the subversive activies of William Bowles.
October 27, 1792 How to Treat Indians Henry Knox Henry Gaither Advised to always be on guard for Indian attacks but to to avoid air of suspicion toward friendly Indians. Always treat them with kindness.
June 7, 1793 Federal Commissioners note to Governor Simcoe on Sandusky Conference proceedings Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Lieutenant General John Graves Simcoe Federal Commissioners beg leave to suggest the following to Governor Simcoe of Upper Canada. Request that all proper means be used to ensure success. Ask the Governor for assistance in making preparatory arrangements; that all the efforts will be fruitless unless means are used to counteract the deep seated prejudice against whites based on the acts of a few. As an example, Commissioners point...