Viewing 1–25 of 42 documents: "innocent"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
July 25, 1797 Unlocking the Mystery James McHenry John McKee The author cites suspicions respecting an unnamed person. He believes that examining his correspondence might unlock the mystery and confirm either his innocence or guilt. Considering his high station and the confidence placed in him, it would be satisfying to find him innocent.
April 21, 1792 Indians Revenging Themselves on the Innocent James Seagrove Henry Knox James Seagrove writes to Knox regarding the subversive actions of several of William Bowles' friends and dispairs at the failure of the State of Georgia to prosecute the murderer of an Indian, the result of which was the revenge killing of two innocent Americans by the murdered Indian's relations.
April 17, 1793 Forgive and Forget What Has Passed William Blount Hanging Maw Blount apoligizes to the Cherokee chiefs for the death of Noon-day who was killed because he was armed and mistakenly identified as a Creek warrior. Blount hopes that this accidental death will not lead to further bloodshed between the Cherokees and the United States.
April 21, 1792 Punishing the Persons Guilty of this Base Act William Blount Henry Knox William Blount describes for Knox various incidents on the frontier in which Indians have murdered innocent Americans and in which Americans fired at an innocent Indian. In response, he has called up three companies of militia to protect the frontier.
August 7, 1787 To the Fat King and Other Head-Men of the Lower Creeks. [not available] Fat King Presumably written by the US Indian Agent for the Creeks, refers to the satisfaction demanded for killings of Creeks. Accuses Lower Creeks of not complying with Treaties of Augusta, Galphinton, and Shoulderbone. Closes by saying the hatchet once lifted is not easily buried.
March 2, 1795 They Will Be Destroyed Without Distinction Anthony Wayne Cherokees Wayne warns that if the murders, robberies, and injuries perpetrated by the Cherokees and other Indians continues, he will call out his warriors to destroy them without distinction since he will be unable to tell the guilty from the innocent. He therefore advises all peaceable Indians to withdraw themselves immediately from the bad ones so as to leave them to the fate that awaits them.
September 30, 1800 Everything Relative to My Conduct Must Be Thoroughly Examined Joseph Williams Samuel Hodgdon Williams discusses the need for an investigation into the conduct of the officers of his department, including himself but assures Hodgdon that he is innocent of wrongdoing.
June 17, 1793 Let us punish them for you. Secretary Smith John Watts Smith urges Cherokee chief Watts to forego taking satisfaction against the white men who committed the base act against his people. The President can be relied upon to punish them instead.
March 17, 1791 Our Misfortunes Seneca Chiefs George Washington The Seneca Chiefs report the misdeeds that are being perpetrated upon them despite Washington's pledge that they would be able to live safely in peace.
July 13, 1799 Response About Status of Officer Who Refused to Lodge a Plea James McHenry John Adams Responds to Adams' request for McHenry's opinion on the matter of Ensign David Fero, who was sentenced to dismissal from the army some time before, and had appealed to Adams. Considers the question of whether Fero's refusal to plead innocent or guilty (instead "standing mute") should affect his status, reviewing military and civil precedents, and concludes that such persons were still punished...
November 20, 1792 Proclamation of Edward Telfair, Governor of Georgia Governor Edward Telfair [not available] This is Governor Telfair's proclmation in which he declares that the murder of a friendly Indian is to be considered by the laws of Georgia the same as the murder of a white person and the offenders are to be punished according to this principle.
July 7, 1797 Intercepted Letter and Misconduct George Washington James McHenry "Nefarious" conduct of late governor and senator discussed. Subject of his investigation involved private gain from public funds at "the expense of innocent lives". Washington will wait for verdict from Congress on matter.
November 14, 1792 Let the Hatchet Be Buried Governor Edward Telfair Headmen and Warriors of the Cherokee Nation The talk of the Governor of Georgia to the Head-men and Warriors of the Cherokee nation in which he urges the Cherokees to once again seek peace with their white neighbors.
May 10, 1787 Regarding surprise over charges against Bayard Stephen Bayard Joseph Howell Expresses surprise that there is a large sum against him. Relates that he settled accounts with Colonel Wood. Suggests that rolls of Congress or Board of War may be location of papers regarding final settlement with Wood. If they were not properly lodged, then it is not Bayard's fault. Refers to other charge paid by John Pierce into the hands of Lieutenant Ross; money was paid by Ross agreeable...
June 5, 1793 Search and Pursuit of the Creeks, Etc. William Blount Chiefs of the Cherokees Blount assures the Cherokee chiefs that he has informed the President of their peaceful intentions and he is looking forward to their visit to Philadelphia. He has ordered the continued pursuit of the marauding Creeks but mounted militia.
May 16, 1793 Aftermath of Incident at Traders Hill St Mary's Creek Chiefs [not available] Cussetahs pledge continued friendship. Because so many whites have been killed, do not see that they can influence matters any longer. Ask that the U.S. give a drubbing and burning to the perpetrators listed as Cowetas, Broken Arrow, Uchees, Usichees, Tallasse. Chiefs ask that Cussetah town and people be spared. Proceeded to give directions on how best to go after the Cowetas, while sparing...
July 26, 1794 Indian Policy on the Southwestern Frontier Henry Knox William Blount Secretary of Knox writes the Governor of Southwest Territory, William Blount. States that it is a "most mortifying circumstance" that recent events on the frontier (white settlers attacking Indian settlements) damage the humane disposition of President Washington towards the American Indians. Hopes that the recent visit of the Cherokee Indians to his office in Philadelphia will "tranquilize them,...
August 8, 1787 Regarding Barn's lamentations for suffering for the guilty conterfeiters Joseph Howell Thomas Barns Refers to Mr. Pierce's absence in Virginia; forwards Barn's letter. Expresses commiseration with Barns that he should suffer for the guilty but most heartily wishes that latter might be found and made to suffer for their villainy. Any information on the altering or counterfeiting will be acceptable to Mr. Pierce.
June 14, 1787 Speech of the Lower Creek chiefs the Hallowing King of the Cowetas and Fat King of Cussetahs. [not available] [not available] Beloved man from Congress was here. Mr McGillivray came over here and matters were settled. Expected that Mr. White would inform the State of Georgia. You always promised that the innocent should not suffer for the guilty. We knew nothing of these bad people or the mischief of the upper towns. Had a meeting with northern Indians lately. Told them we had settled matters with Virginians and could...
March 4, 1793 Letter from Timothy Barnard [Bernard] to Major Henry Gaither regarding translator Mr George Cornells, son of Joseph Cornells Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither Timothy Bernard, writing to Major Henry Gaither, notes that delivery of the letter is by Mr. George Cornell, son of Joseph Cornell, linguist [translator] for the United States who did business for the Mad Dog of the Tuchabatches to Cussetah, which favors the United States. Refers to the Shawnee talks; that they would bring destruction on the land. Bernard wants to acquaint Gaither with Cornell;...
April 20, 1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard to Major Gaither regarding Major James Seagrove's demands in aftemath of violations Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither Three parts out of four of the Creek Nation are in favor of peace. At Cupetah talks, concluded to give satisfaction to Major Seagrove's demands. Mr John Galphin largely responsible of the incident at Traders Hill. Upper Creeks asking for more time from Major Seagrove, as his demands fixed a time too short. Buzzard Roost people report that Cowetas doing mischief. Concern that the white men will...
February 11, 1784 Murders in the Cumberland Gap Alexander Martin Joseph Martin Governor Martin (of North Carolina) directs an investigation into murders committed in the Cumberland Gap. He states that if Cherokee or Chickamauga Indians are responsible a military expedition will be sent into their nation to obtain "satisfaction" unless they surrender the murderers. Directs that squatters be ordered off Indian Lands. Discusses an agreement between Spain and the Delaware...
April 26, 1793 Gunn discusses Indian affairs in the South with Knox James Gunn Henry Knox Letter, describes problems with Indian affairs, the Indian agent, and the army command in the south.
August 26, 1793 Instructions from President of United States General George Washington to Governor Blount on late violent inroads by white settlers from the southwestern territory into the Cherokee Nation Henry Knox William Blount In this letter to William Blount, Governor of Southwest Territory, Knox conveys President Washington's concerns about white inroads onto peaceable parts of Cherokee lands. President Washington asks that Blount ensure that white perpetrators be brought to justice. Warns Blount that efforts at peace, moderation and justice will be in vain unless crimes are punished. Treaties will be at an end, and...
December 29, 1794 Peaceful policy towards the Indians Henry Knox George Washington Secretary Knox submits his observations regarding the preservation of peace with Indian tribes whom the U.S. has formed treaties with. Writes: "The desires of too many frontier white people, to seize, by force or fraud, upon the neighboring Indian lands, has been, and still continues to be, an unceasing cause of jealousy and hatred on the part of the Indians... until the Indians can be quieted...