Viewing 1–25 of 1,132 documents: "hunting land"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
August 11, 1792 Boundary Disputes Henry Knox Alexander McGillivray Mention of imposter Bowles and his "pernicious influence" on the boundary line between Creek and U.S. lands. Knox advised McGillivray to use his influence to run boundary according to treaty. Land rights, hunting grounds, and hostilities between Indians and settlers discussed.
June 1, 1789 A Talk from the Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors of the Lower Creek Nation. Headmen and Warriors of Lower Creeks [not available] Begins with expressions of friendship; and it was never intended to hurt white people. Note that "at our first meeting at the sea side, for the benefit of trade, we gave our land as far as the water ebbed and flowed, and by frequent request, granted as far as possible, reserving our hunting grounds: for what will be the use of goods brought amongst us, if our young men have not hunting ground to...
September 1, 1788 [By the United States in Congress Assembled] Resolve to Protect Cherokees Charles Thomson Henry Knox Resolution of Congress that ordered Secretary of War to assemble troops to march from Ohio for the protection of the Cherokee Indians. Troops are meant to keep peace between whites and Indians and disperse those settled on Indian hunting grounds.
November 20, 1788 Land Negotiations Little Turkey Richard Winn Use of hunting grounds and positive negotiations with New York and Virginia.
April 25, 1800 License to Trade with Indians James McHenry Arthur St. Clair Addressed topic of previous letter from St. Clair regarding trade with Indians. McHenry believed it proper to limit people licensed to trade with Indians to certain towns agreeable to the choice of the most influential chief. Also advised the trader could not follow Indians to hunting grounds.
April 26, 1800 Modern Printed Transcription of Letter/Document, James McHenry to Arthur St. Clair James McHenry Arthur St. Clair Discussed trade with Indians and receipt of licenses by traders. Traders should be restricted to certain towns, as decided by the most senior and influential chief. It should be forbidden that the traders accompany the Indians to their hunting grounds. Secretary of War endorsed this proposal.
December 2, 1796 Transcript of Talks Between Different Indian Chiefs & Secretary of War on Necessity of Peace Between Tribes James McHenry [not available] McHenry, on behalf of President Washington, advises all the Indians assembled to not go to war with each other. The representatives of the tribes then comment on this advice and on peace-making among themselves; the loss of land, the fate of Indian prisoners held by other tribes, and the shared use of hunting grounds are discussed. Much is made of the union of all the Indian nations as...
November 3, 1794 Speech of the Wyandots Chiefs of the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Speech of a Wyandot chief, delivered to General Anthony Wayne at Greenville. The Wyandots plea for peace, and claim to be determined "to bury the hatchet and scalping knife deep in the ground." Asks that the United States "have pity on us, and leave us a small piece of land to build a town upon." Mourn that there is no longer sufficient land to live and hunt upon.
March 5, 1792 Intrusion on Indian Hunting Grounds Richard Justice William Blount Richard Justice and Thomas Glass write to Governor Blount regarding Little Turkey's movements and their willingness to adhere to any agreement between Little Turkey and the Governor. There have been encounters between whites and Indians in Indian hunting grounds but there has been no violence.
March 9, 1795 Notification of Hunting Party Delaware Indians Anthony Wayne Speech expressing happiness with U.S. relations. Notification that hunters traveling to Grand Glaize plan to trade and kill/hunt.
February 12, 1798 Appropriate Time to Hold Treaty with Cherokee Indians Andrew Jackson James McHenry Anderson, Jackson, and Claiborne advised McHenry on time of Treaty with Cherokee's regarding the "affair in Tennessee" that dealt with land rights of settlers and Indians.
February 24, 1786 Talk of Old Tassel with Governor of Georgia Chief Tosell Governor Edward Telfair Talk of the Cherokee Chief "Old Tossell" (Old Tassel) to the Governor of Georgia asking that he keep John Sevier and his "bad men" from raiding the Cherokee towns. Fear of disturbance from white settlers, who frightened their women and children into the woods and plundered their homes. They seek peace.
June 15, 1795 Extracts from a Conference Held with the Creeks in Savannah James Seagrove William Blount Lists proceedings of various treaties between Indian tribes and between tribes and United States related to hunting ground rights.
April 24, 1793 Protection of Frontier Henry Knox Henry Lee Protection of frontier from every danger impractical, therefore Executive will assess situations presented and distribute troops accordingly. Proposed treaty with Indians from north of the Ohio discussed.
December 28, 1788 Speech Regarding Land Disputes Major General Richard Butler [not available] Butlers speech addressed Indians of North Western territory regarding land disputes and settlement of boundary between the U.S. and the Six Nations. Recounted past treaties. Butler notified the Six Nations that they would have to settle their disputes with the Governor because his term as Superintendent of Indian Affairs expired.
January 22, 1795 Copy of Proclamation Regarding Cherokee Territory William Blount [not available] Copy of document drawn up in presence of Cherokee commissioners regarding boundary lines of Indian and U.S. land. Outlines boundary lines based on topographic landmarks. Offers protection of boundary and people abiding by law by United States.
June 20, 1797 Captain Chapin discusses Indian affairs with Secretary at War Israel Chapin Jr James McHenry Letter, mentions annuity goods; informs re Indian treaty request to sell land.
March 11, 1800 Request for Military Bounty Land Denied James McHenry William McPherson Request for Lieutenants share of Continental Military Bounty Land denied because McPherson quit the service prior to the end of the war.
May 18, 1791 Land Purchase Henry Knox John Wendell 2500 acre land sale discussed.
September 10, 1792 Hopes of Peace Glass William Blount The Glass, brother of Bloody Fellow, relayed Col. Robertson's statement to take revenge against Indians that spilled white man's blood. Hoped that all aggressions will cease and only peace will exist between U.S. and Creeks.
April 22, 1799 Land grants Isaac Wayne Samuel Hodgdon Transmits information on grants of land
January 26, 1800 Land Warrants Isaac Craig Samuel Hodgdon Notification that J. Bever, land surveyor, will call upon Hodgdon for military land warrant. Bever en route to Philadelphia to attend drawing of lottery and to locate several land warrants currently in his hands.
[not available] [Extract from the Report of B. Lincoln , Cyrys Griffin and D. Humphries Commissioners for a Treaty with the Souths Indians] Benjamin Lincoln [not available] Investigation into representation at several treaties between U.S. and Creeks, verified Creeks ceded hunting grounds to Georgia.
December 19, 1795 Land Rights William Blount Timothy Pickering Notification that problems will arise over land rights around the territories of North Carolina due to recent influx of settlers, Cherokee land holdings, disputed boundaries, and land grants issued by the government.
June 26, 1794 Land Disputes on Western Frontier of Pennsylvania Unknown Author [not available] Answer to Six Nations: Land West and North of Pennsylvania was purchased by U.S. from Six Nations; therefore they have no right to ask white settlers to move off the aforementioned land.