Viewing 1–25 of 344 documents: "hunting ground"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 1, 1789 A Talk from the Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors of the Lower Creek Nation. Headmen and Warriors of Lower Creeks [not available] Begins with expressions of friendship; and it was never intended to hurt white people. Note that "at our first meeting at the sea side, for the benefit of trade, we gave our land as far as the water ebbed and flowed, and by frequent request, granted as far as possible, reserving our hunting grounds: for what will be the use of goods brought amongst us, if our young men have not hunting ground to...
July 16, 1788 Indian business is unfavorable, but holds out hope for peace Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Reports that business has an unfavorable aspect, but is still hopeful for peace. Will not spend money allocated by congress unless objects in view can be obtained. West line will not be agreed upon because of value as hunting ground. Encloses copies of letters from Wilson the messenger, Khun, a Wyandot Chief, to Colonel Butler.
June 15, 1795 Extracts from a Conference Held with the Creeks in Savannah James Seagrove William Blount Lists proceedings of various treaties between Indian tribes and between tribes and United States related to hunting ground rights.
October 10, 1799 Winter Quarters for the 8th, 9th, and 10th Regiments Thomas Parker Alexander Hamilton States that with the help of Tobias Lear he has selected ground for winter quarters for the Eighth, Ninth, and Tenth Regiments. Adds that he "made this arrangement on a supposition that the troops are to encamp in the same manner as during the Revolution war. If I am not correct in my ideas of the business, be pleased to inform me...as there is a scarcity of materials for hunting; that no time...
February 24, 1786 Talk of Old Tassel with Governor of Georgia Chief Tosell Governor Edward Telfair Talk of the Cherokee Chief "Old Tossell" (Old Tassel) to the Governor of Georgia asking that he keep John Sevier and his "bad men" from raiding the Cherokee towns. Fear of disturbance from white settlers, who frightened their women and children into the woods and plundered their homes. They seek peace.
March 5, 1792 Intrusion on Indian Hunting Grounds Richard Justice William Blount Richard Justice and Thomas Glass write to Governor Blount regarding Little Turkey's movements and their willingness to adhere to any agreement between Little Turkey and the Governor. There have been encounters between whites and Indians in Indian hunting grounds but there has been no violence.
March 9, 1795 Notification of Hunting Party Delaware Indians Anthony Wayne Speech expressing happiness with U.S. relations. Notification that hunters traveling to Grand Glaize plan to trade and kill/hunt.
January 6, 1800 Value of Public Ground Richard Parker Samuel Hodgdon Colonel Alexander's survey will show that the valuation of the public ground should be half as much with the seven acres and the spring taken off. The proprietor's agent may ask for pay at the present valuation. If possible, a new valuation should be made but the claim should be held as the survey now stands. Mr. Montgomery is travelling to Philadelphia and will explain the whole business.
November 20, 1788 Land Negotiations Little Turkey Richard Winn Use of hunting grounds and positive negotiations with New York and Virginia.
October 29, 1787 Report from French Creek Jonathan Heart Henry Knox Heart gives his report on the events occurring in the vicinity of French Creek with particular emphasis on the activities of the local tribes who are anxious to continue trading with Americans.
July 29, 1799 Claims on the Ground Along the Spring Richard Parker Samuel Hodgdon The agent is at Carlisle disposing of the lots and commons and there are a great many applications for lots. The people who claimed the ground along the spring now claim the Baker house and coal house and all the ground along the spring in front of the buildings. It was the great neglect of Captain Eames that allowed Wilson to get control of that land and Parker seeks instructions from Hodgdon as...
[not available] [Extract from the Report of B. Lincoln , Cyrys Griffin and D. Humphries Commissioners for a Treaty with the Souths Indians] Benjamin Lincoln [not available] Investigation into representation at several treaties between U.S. and Creeks, verified Creeks ceded hunting grounds to Georgia.
November 3, 1794 Speech of the Wyandots Chiefs of the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Speech of a Wyandot chief, delivered to General Anthony Wayne at Greenville. The Wyandots plea for peace, and claim to be determined "to bury the hatchet and scalping knife deep in the ground." Asks that the United States "have pity on us, and leave us a small piece of land to build a town upon." Mourn that there is no longer sufficient land to live and hunt upon.
September 27, 1789 Explanation for Retreat from Former Camp and Prospects for Further Talks Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department McGillivray says he moved camp because he needed food for his horses. Relates that he spoke at length with Colonel Humphreys regarding the contest between Creeks and state of Georgia. Says that when he learned that discussions would not include encroachments or restitution of hunting grounds, or Oconee lands, then he resolved to return to the nation to refer the matter until spring. Nothing...
September 11, 1795 The Supplement to the Treaty of Greenville Henry De Butts [not available] Shawnee explained the reason they have caused mischief was due to their camp in Scioto being robbed when they were peaceably hunting. The hunting party did not know the chiefs of their Nation had made peace with the U.S. Shawnee beg forgiveness.
April 25, 1800 License to Trade with Indians James McHenry Arthur St. Clair Addressed topic of previous letter from St. Clair regarding trade with Indians. McHenry believed it proper to limit people licensed to trade with Indians to certain towns agreeable to the choice of the most influential chief. Also advised the trader could not follow Indians to hunting grounds.
February 12, 1796 Promises to Gather Information John Park Samuel Hodgdon Park writes in absence of Craig, noted receipt of letter regarding Mr. Ro. Ground. Information requested to be gathered immediately.
April 26, 1800 Modern Printed Transcription of Letter/Document, James McHenry to Arthur St. Clair James McHenry Arthur St. Clair Discussed trade with Indians and receipt of licenses by traders. Traders should be restricted to certain towns, as decided by the most senior and influential chief. It should be forbidden that the traders accompany the Indians to their hunting grounds. Secretary of War endorsed this proposal.
August 23, 1792 Murder of Young Man by Indians Multiple Authors James Seagrove [A talk From the Kings, chiefs, warriors, and head-men of the Cussetahs and Cowetas, to James Seagrove.] Noted murder of young man by Indians, Cussetahs and Cowetahs did not know the identity of the murderer(s). Asked for patience in finding offending Indian as hunting season is soon. Signs of good faith issued.
September 25, 1789 Response to the Commissioner's Proposals Alexander McGillivray Benjamin Lincoln McGillivray reports that the Chiefs are not entirely satisfied with the proposals put forth by the Commissioners. Their primary objection is to the proposed boundary. McGillivray decided to let the matter stand for now, as it is almost hunting season. The Chiefs will try to prevent hostilities over the winter. The Indians will shortly depart; McGillivray suggests that the commissioners give them...
November 24, 1796 Request for Marking of Boundary Between White & Indian Lands Chiefs of the Chickasaw Nation James McHenry The chiefs of the Chickasaw have assembled to receive word from the president of the United States, as directed. They also express worry over settlers building up on their borders. To prevent encroachment, they ask that the president have the previously established boundary well-marked, to make it clear to white immigrants in the region.
January 2, 1794 Indians attacked by whites Captain Richard B. Roberts Governor Edward Telfair Capt. Richard Roberts writes the Governor of Georgia on the vicious attack against a band of hunting Creek Indians by a group of whites under the command of Capt. Jonathan Adams. Roberts details what happened.
November 1792 Presents for the Indians James Seagrove [not available] Seagrove lists the articles he requires as presents to the Indians, Though they want gunpowder and lead, he is reluctant to give it to them.
October 20, 1794 Letter to the Governor of Southwest Territory Double-head William Blount Letter from Double Head of an Indian tribe in Tennessee, to Governor William Blount of the Southwest Territory. These particular Indians have friendly relations with the United States and insult the Creek Indians in the letter. Double Head writes that his people are desirous of hunting, but fear whites on the frontier who may harm them.
February 15, 1796 Adopt the Useful Ways of the White People Timothy Pickering Chiefs & Warriors of the Six Nations Pickering advises the Indians to "adopt the useful ways of the white people." He admits that it will not be easy for them to abandon their hunting culture but warns that game is becoming scarce. To quote from the letter: "Brothers, I have often shown you what good things the white people enjoy, and explained how you might enjoy them. You have answered, that what I told you is very good, and that...