Viewing 1–25 of 3,028 documents: "hostile Indians"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
December 13, 1792 Message to be delivered to hostile Indians Henry Knox General Israel Chapin Secretary Knox informs General Chapin that Jasper Parrish, the interpreter, arrived with a letter from Chapin's son, enclosing a message from the hostile Indians and also from the Six Nations. He has set out this day on his return to Canandaigua. Requested that the message to the hostile Indians be forwarded to them immediately.
April 2, 1792 CIRCULAR: Notification of President's Offer to Indians for Peace James Wilkinson Commanding Officer, Militia of Kentucky Notification of President's final offer to hostile Indians for peace, messengers dispatched. Advised against hostilities toward Indians.
March 24, 1791 Hostile Intentions of the Western Indians, Etc. Henry Knox Rufus Putnam The hostile intentions of the western Indians seem clear. The recent murder at Beaver Creek of some friendly Indians should be investigated so as to avoid a general Indian war. It is hoped that the impending campaign will produce peace.
July 16, 1794 Detailed Information on Hostile Indians Movement Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Mounted volunteers under Major General Scott and Captain Butler at Fort Washington ordered to Green ville to track the movement of hostile Indians. Escape path given in detail.
July 28, 1791 COPY: Enclosed Letters and Extracts from Pickering John Stagg Arthur St. Clair In Secretary of War's absence, Stagg transmitted letters from Pickering who was in the process of negotiating a peace with the hostile Indians.
December 15, 1792 Meeting with Cornplanter, Hostile Indians Henry Knox Anthony Wayne Urged invitation of Cornplanter to visit Wayne to discuss information regarding the Six Nations [of Indians]. Message sent to hostile Indians confirming meeting between United States and Indians.
February 16, 1793 Instructions for Treating with the Hostile Indians Henry Knox President of the United States Knox provides general ideas on how the Commissioners should treat with the hostile Indians
December 6, 1792 Report on the Council with the Hostile Western Tribes Henry Knox George Washington Knox reports to the President on the council held between the chiefs of the Six Nations and the chiefs of the hostile western tribes.
November 5, 1794 Peace with hostile Indians Anthony Wayne Unknown Recipient General Anthony Wayne regarding the establishment of a "permanent and lasting peace" between the United States and "hostile tribes of Indians." Talks of a treaty with the Wyandots. Also talks of "some of the bad white people" who have instigated conflict.
June 27, 1792 Conditions of U.S. Treaty with Six Nations Henry Knox Joseph Brandt Formal invitation to Brandt to sit on General Council as Chief of Six Nations. Document explains the U.S. stance on hostile Indians, hopes Brandt will convey sentiments to Indians.
April 24, 1793 Prohibit Incursions into Indian Country Henry Knox Arthur St. Clair Knox emphasizes that during the treaty talks at lower Sandusky, hostile incursions by white citizens into Indian country should be strictly prohibited so as not to impede the peace process.
December 15, 1792 Facts in the Communications of the Six Nations, Etc. Henry Knox Anthony Wayne Knox wants Wayne to meet with the Cornplanter and Red Jacket to explain the facts contained in the communications of the Six Nations. The hostile Indians have been asked to meet with representatives of the United States at the appointed time and place.
May 18, 1792 Accompanying Putnam on His Peace Mission Henry Knox John Heckenwelder Knox requests that Indian expert Heckenwelder accompany General Putnam on his mission to seek peace with the northwestern Indians.
July 7, 1790 Hostile Indians Harry Innes Henry Knox Discussed dealing with hostile Shawnee Indians. Treaty at Fort Harmar, relations b/w settlers and Indians. Innes asserts Indians are aggressors and that settlers are defending their safety.
December 12, 1792 Knox directs Chapin regarding Indian affairs Henry Knox General Israel Chapin Letter, Knox directs that Chapin ensure messages be delivered to hostile Indians; Knox directs Red Jacket be sent to War Office; alludes to Indian delegation.
October 27, 1792 Advised Defensive Action Against Indians Henry Knox Charles Pinckney Discussed tribes of friendly and hostile Indians with locations of settlements. Notified Pinckney that Congress must authorize war, advised preparations for defensive actions against hostile Indians. President advised ammunition should be provided from public arsenal.
August 12, 1794 Chapin discusses Indian affairs with Knox [not available] Henry Knox Letter, informs re arrangements for treaty with Six Nations; discusses Wayne's campaign; discusses hostile Indians; alludes to White encroachment; mentions frontiers and pioneer life.
October 10, 1786 Effect of hostile intentions of Indians on surveying business Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Because of hostile intentions of Indians, Captain Hutchins declined to prosecute surveying business and retired to the Ohio River. Captain Hamtramck is to provide a detachment for security. Hutchins is zealous to carry out the ordinance of Congress and resume surveying, but Indian situation is dangerous.
September 19, 1790 [COPY] Notification to British of Peaceful Intentions Arthur St. Clair Major Murray St. Clair, having been commanded to do so by President Washington, notified Major Murray that the expedition west was to handle hostile Indians and the United States held only a peaceful disposition toward Great Britain and all her possessions. Design is to humble and chastise some of the savage tribes, whose depredations have become intolerable, and whose cruelties have become an outrage.
October 27, 1794 Relations with hostile Indians Henry Knox Arnoldus Vanderhorst Summary of hostile Cherokee and Chicamagua tribe actions and designs along the Tennessee River. Relations with United States and various tribes. Notes that Congress would be in session and discussed process of declaring war.
March 9, 1792 Authorization of President for Expedition to Frontier Henry Knox Charles Scott Request for adequate assistance to those on the frontier for protection against hostile Indians laid before Congress. AUTHORIZATION OF PRESIDENT for expedition to ascertain environment and possibility of capturing Indians from settlements on the Wabash River. Conditions for expedition laid out in detail.
June 27, 1792 Knox's Invitation to a Chief of the Six Nations to the General Government Henry Knox [not available] The recipient, a chief of the Six Nations, is invited to the seat of the US Government to hear the US policy towards the hostile and non-hostile Indian tribes. The US hopes to disabuse the hostile tribes, especially the Miami, Wabash, and Shawnee, of the idea that the US is trying to steal land. They hope that the chiefs will help to communicate the following points to the hostile tribes: the US...
November 28, 1794 Hostile Creek Indians William Blount Henry Knox Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory writes that the Creek Indians "continue to murder" American citizens, "in their houses and fields." Blount believes that the Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Cherokees will readily aid the United States against the Creeks. Blount concludes by writing, "the friendly Cherokees serve as a guard against the hostile Creeks."
May 30, 1794 Expedition against hostile Indians Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Letter to the Secretary of War concerning hostile Indians in the Northwest Territory, particularly those assembled at Roche de Bout at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of the Lake. Mentions Governor John Graves Simcoe of Upper Canada, who is commanding a force in support of the tribes.
January 7, 1792 Continuing the War Against the Hostile Indians Henry Knox Cornplanter, Chief of the Senecas Knox, speaking for the President, assures the Cornplanter and the other friendly chiefs that the United States, despite past defeats, will continue the war against the hostile Indians and will afford their peoples whatever protection that it is in the power of the United States to provide.