Viewing 1–25 of 66 documents: "headmen"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
November 21, 1785 Journal of Commissioners at Treaty of Hopewell, South Carolina [not available] [not available] Entry reports that Headmen and warriors of Cherokees assembled. Ordered that interpreters inform Indians that commissioners will meet the following day at 10 o'clock, under the bower erected for that purpose.
May 15, 1787 We Are For Peace Speaker of the Seneca Tribes Unknown Recipient A spokesman for the Seneca tribes expresses his desire for peace which requires the Headmen of both the Indians and Whites to control the hostile actions of their young men.
September 26, 1789 Talk of the Commissioners plenipotentiary in reply to the talk of White Bird King Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] Commissioners express disappointment that Alexander McGillivray has left camp. They point out their propositions for peace and friendship. If the terms were not agreeable, they ask, why was that not communicated? Close by asking the headmen to persuade McGillivray to come back and meet with the commissioners.
June 25, 1788 Steps taken by commissioners to bring about treaty with Creek Indians Richard Winn Henry Knox Steps taken by commissioners to bring about treaty with Creek Indians. Talk was addressed to Mr. McGillivray, and headmen and warriors, insisting that hostilities cease. Executive of Georgia said 15th September is as early as this matter can be begun on. Discusses further supply of goods as presents to indians as necessary. Points out that commission as superintendent expires 29 August.
November 22, 1785 Opening Address from Commissioners at Hopewell Treaty [not available] [not available] Commissioners state that they have been sent by Congress to meet to headmen of Cherokees. Express good wishes. The recount the contributions of Cherokees during the American Revolutionary War. Make reference to the sovereignty of congress, to a map, and point out that Congress wants none of their lands. Will listen to any grievances.
May 28, 1792 Cowetas Not Responsible for the Murder James Durouzeaux James Seagrove Durouzeaux informs Seagrove that the Cowetas were not responsible for the recent murder. General McGillivray has gone to New Orleans so the headmen of the Coweta and Cussetah will come to Rock Landing to talk peace with Seagrove.
April 20, 1789 Talk of the Commissioners of the United States to the Creek Nation [not available] [not available] Pickens and Osborne invite Creek Headmen to treaty talks on bank of Oconee River at the Rock Landing. Location changed from previous year to accommodate Creek wishes. The United States is now governed by a President, who is like the old King over the great water. He commands all the warriors of the thirteen fires. He will be the Creeks' father and the Creeks will be his children. George Galphin...
September 26, 1793 Letter from W Urquhart on behalf of Georgia Governor Telfair to James Seagrove on conditions for peace with Creek Indians W. Urquhart James Seagrove From the Georgia Statehouse in Augusta, Urquhart relays Governor of Georgia Telfair's requirements on the part of the state of Georgia for peace with the Creek Indians. Captured property and contracts restored; prisoners returned; perpetrators of murders (13) be surrendered; requires 10 headmen of the lower Creek Towns as hostages until requirements fulfilled. State of Georgia will not recognize...
March 22, 1793 Letter from Charles Weatherford to Creek Indian Agent James Seagrove on confusion since death of General McGillivray Charles Weatherford James Seagrove Copy of Letter from Charles Weatherford to Indian Agent for the Creeks, James Seagrove. Weatherford reports that there is confusion and fighting between the Creeks and Chickasaws since the death of General McGillivray in February. Weatherford has sent headmen to the lower towns to stop the mischief. Reports that the Chickasaws have killed some Creeks and out of revenge, Creeks have killed...
June 4, 1792 Boundaries Between the United States & the Cherokee Nation William Blount Little Turkey Blount informs Little Turkey and the other chiefs of the Cherokees of the plans to run the boundary lines between U. S. territory and the Cherokee nation. The United States commissioners who will run the line are men of great stature and integrity and it is expected that the Cherokee headmen who will be involved will be of similar character.
November 28, 1785 Draught of Treaty [not available] [not available] Commissioners assembled, to include Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, Joseph Martin, Laughlin McIntosh. From North Carolina, William Blount. From Georgia, John King and Thomas Glasscock. Interpreters James Madison and Arthur Coody. Commissioners produced draught of treaty. Previous to signing agent from North Carolina and commissioners from Georgia delivered protests. After signing, headmen...
November 29, 1785 Treaty with the Cherokee Indians conducted at Hopewell, South Carolina, on the Keowee 1785. Commissioners for Treaty of Hopewell, 1785 [not available] U.S. Commissioners of Indian Affairs conducted treaty with the headmen and warriors of the Cherokee Nation. Treaty between Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, Joseph Martin, and Lachlan McIntosh, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of United States, and Headmen and Warriors of Cherokees, held at Hopewell. Commissioners ordered a return of the Indians and it was 918. Goods amounting to $1311 distributed...
June 7, 1796 A Talk from the Mad Dog to the Chickasaw Nation Mad Dog [not available] Talks received with happy hearts, Mad Dog's tribe now sends its strength to the Chickasaws.
June 21, 1793 Headmen Want Peace with the United States, Etc. Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither Barnard reports that headmen of Cussetahs, and headmen of upper and lower Creeks all seem to want peace with United States. Their intent was to make satisfaction for the murders and robbery at Robert Seagrove's store at Trader's Hill on St Marys River, but for the intervention of William Panton. At Tuckabatches, Indians agreed to return stolen horses; Cowetas and Chickasaws refuse to comply....
February 20, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to the Chiefs and Headmen of the Cussetah and Coweta Towns James Seagrove Chiefs and Headmen of Cussetah & Coweta Towns Letter from James Seagrove to the Chiefs and Headmen of the Cussetah and Coweta Towns, dated St. Mary's, 20 Feb. 1793. Seagrove writes to inform the Creek leadership that he will meet with them 1 May; and that the talks from the great father General Washington, President of the United States, are straight and good towards Creeks. Seagrove admonishes Creek leaders not to listen to the northward...
October 12, 1792 Dispersal of the Indian Party Collected for War Henry Knox Anthony Wayne There had been a warning from the Governor of Tennessee that 300-500 hostile Indians were ready to go to war but the intercession of several headmen led to the dispersal of the warriors. As a result, the brigade that had been preparing to confront the Indians was ordered to stand down. The President is expected tomorrow so his orders regarding the disposition of the troops of the Legion will soon...
September 15, 1792 Letters Received from Equaka William Blount Henry Knox Letters received from Bloody Fellow inform Blount that the war parties have dispersed, and he is in the process of discharging regiments.
November 26, 1785 The Headmen Produce their Map and Tassel Addresses the Commissioners [not available] [not available] Discussion on the boundaries. Colonel Richard Henderson called a liar in his dealings. Commissioners point out that Henderson is dead and say that the country believes it has long since been sold. Tassel says it may be too late to recover the land. Commissioners refer to claims of people settled at Nashville Tennessee and the Chickasaws. Tassel and Tuskgahatchee wish to postpone the matter if the...
September 22, 1793 LtCol Melton's statement to the Creeks at Donally Town Lieutenant Colonel William Melton Creek Chiefs LtCol. William Melton informs the Creek headmen of Donally Town that, under his authority, 8 Indian women and children are taken prisoner. Melton states further that the prisoners will be delivered into the hands of the Governor of Georgia, whom he expects will then give the Creeks, "a new lesson of humanity."
1793 Talks from Headmen of Chehaws and Telluina: Militea, Stinnpoe, Stophia Chopes, Chehaw Tustanmocca, Tustanochogn, and Cochorona Tustanmocca to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent on their participation in the murder and robbery at Traders Hill St Marys Headmen Chehaws James Seagrove Undated document, probably generated during late spring 1793. The headmen explain that they thought there was a general war when they came upon the dead Captain Fleming at Robert Seagrove's store, Traders Hill St Marys. Thinking it was war, they killed others, but not involved in the initial killing at the store. Ask Seagrove for a talk via Mr Kinnard's negro boy. They have a great deal of...
November 25, 1785 Request for time to draw map of country [not available] [not available] Headmen request paper and pencil and to be left to themselves in order to draw up a map of their country.
May 23, 1789 A Talk from the Head-men and Chiefs of the Lower Creek Nation to the Commissioners of the United States, of Indian Affairs in the Southern Department. Headmen and Warriors of Lower Creeks [not available] Received talk from Mr. George Galphin. Cannot provide answer because of separate talks with Alexander McGillivray. Lament that some have "gone out" [to commit violence] and say they cannot be accountable for this. Hope there will be no blood spilled.
September 28, 1793 Extract of letter from Major Henry Gaither to Joshua Meals, Merchant, Augusta Henry Gaither Joshua Meals [In quotation marks], letter from Major Gaither informs merchant Joshua Meals that Gaither will leave for the Oakmulgee next day and will need to furnish James Seagrove with a guard, pack horses and will likely have to accompany Seagrove himself in order to provide protection from several parties of militia.
May 21, 1797 Letter to the Chickasaws Benjamin Hawkins Chickasaw Nation of Indians The author, which is likely Benjamin Hawkins, discusses his plans for boundary surveys, the rejection of an application of a trader, a letter from Piomingo to General Robertson complaining that the Creeks were stealing horses from the Chickasaws, and the claim of George Colbert against the Cherokees regarding payment for "his negroes."
November 20, 1792 Preserving the Peace & Preparing for War Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Telfair discusses the steps he has taken to bring to justice the offenders who murdered friendly Cherokees. He warns Knox that if the endeavors to preserve the peace are not successful, the federal government must provide the additional resources needed to defend against marauding Indians.