Viewing 1–25 of 1,977 documents: "future peace and friendship"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
September 13, 1792 Token of Friendship William Blount Little Turkey Received letter from Little Turkey which Blount viewed as a sincere token of friendship with United States and of desire for peace. Blount stated that towns that did not declare war will be able to remain on their land in peace. Requests that hearty thanks be passed along to other chiefs.
June 20, 1791 Council Fire for Peace Captain Hendrick Aupaumut [not available] The Stockbridge Chief expresses his gratitude to Captain Aupaunot that they have been able to come together in friendship and peace.
July 14, 1791 Good Peter's Speech Good Peter [not available] In his speech, Good Peter discusses the strength of the United States, peace, cultivated lands, the civilizing of Indians, and Indian literacy.
January 22, 1795 Ratification of a Treaty of Peace and Friendship George Washington [not available] President Washington formally confirms the ratification of a Treaty of Peace and friendship concluded by Timothy Pickering at Canandagua the 11th day of November 1794 between the Six Nations of Indians and the United States.
August 7, 1790 Speech of the Commissioners prior to Signing of the Treaty of New York Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] This is the speech of the the Commissioners of the Southern Department prior to the signing of the Treaty of New York with the chiefs of the Creek Nation.
November 22, 1792 Peace & Friendship with the United States James Seagrove Henry Knox After his meeting with eighteen Creek chiefs, Seagrove confirms that the Creeks have no interest in joining the northern tribes against the forces of the United States.
1792 Brighten the Chain of Friendship Rufus Putnam [not available] Putnam invites the chiefs of the western tribes to travel to Philadelphia, at government expense, to attempt to reach a settlement that will avoid war between them and the United States.
January 10, 1795 Enclosed Journal of Peace Treaty Council William Blount Timothy Pickering Enclosed journal of the proceedings between Cherokee chiefs and Blount which ended with peace agreement. Objective of meeting was to convince Cherokees to terminate friendship between their nation and the Creek Nation.
April 30, 1798 Perfect State of Peace & Friendship with the Indians, Etc. Henry Gaither Samuel Hodgdon Gaither assures Hodgdon that he is in a perfect state of peace and friendship with the Indians and has the honor of being in command of the frontier. Enclosed is a return of the clothing needed in his command. The infantry clothing for Ensign Thompson at Fort James should, if possible, be forwarded to Captain Nicoll at Fort St. Tammany on the St. Marys River and, if not, to John Habersham at...
December 2, 1796 Speech to the Indians from the Secretary at War, Urging Peace into the Future, and Replies James McHenry Northwestern Indian Chiefs Speaking for Washington, McHenry urges the Indians to maintain peace with the U.S. and each other, and to settle all intertribal disputes peacefully. Opens the set of Indian negotiations with a message from Washington to "hold fast the Chain of Friendship." Document includes replies of the Chiefs.
August 27, 1785 Murder of Billy Nation Unknown Author [not available] A speech delivered at the Falls of the Ohio to unnamed Indian Nations intended to preserve the peace. The speech indicates that an Inidan named "Billy Nation" was murdered by a white man who subsequently fled into the woods. The speech asks that the chain of friendship not be broken on account of one villian.
November 16, 1792 It is our desire for your people to lay down their arms. [not available] [not available] Representatives of the Six Nations report on their mission to the Westward Indians to get them to agree to a peaceful settlement.
November 16, 1794 Closing remarks for the Conference between the Six Nations and the U.S. Timothy Pickering [not available] Document, Pickering issues a statement praising Chief Little Billy for making the conference productive.
December 24, 1793 Six Nations' Request for a Boundary Henry Knox Sachems, Chiefs, & Warriors of the Six Nations Knox expresses his gratitude to the head-men of the Six Nations for their assistance in the unsuccessful effort to obtain peace with the hostile Indians. The good feelings toward the Six Nations will affect the response of the United States to their request for a new boundary line to which there are strong objections. It is hoped that a compromise can be reached.
November 30, 1793 Peace and Understanding Re-established James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Seagrove notifies Governor Telfair of the re-establishment of peace and friendship with the Creek nation which includes the understanding that all prisoners and stolen property will be returned. He wants the Governor to waste no time in promulgating this welcome news to prevent outrages from being committed against the Indians which would endanger the fragile peace.
September 27, 1792 Treaty with the Wabash and Illinois Tribes Rufus Putnam Wabash and Illinois Tribes A Treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between the President of the United States and the undersigned kings, chiefs, and warriors of the Wabash and Illinois tribes.
September 26, 1789 Talk of the Commissioners plenipotentiary in reply to the talk of White Bird King Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] Commissioners express disappointment that Alexander McGillivray has left camp. They point out their propositions for peace and friendship. If the terms were not agreeable, they ask, why was that not communicated? Close by asking the headmen to persuade McGillivray to come back and meet with the commissioners.
September 29, 1795 Speech by Indian Chief to U.S. Commissioner at Fort George, 09/29/1795. Unknown Iroquois Chief [not available] Thanks U.S. commissioners for their determination to do justice by the Indians. Confirms that the Indians' claim is just, and appeals to the Americans' Christianity to ensure that they continue to deal justly. Affirms wish for love and friendship between the two peoples, unto future generations -- and says that this example should be followed by all Indians. Says that word the U.S.'s just...
February 17, 1792 Affection and Friendship for the Choctaw Nation Henry Knox Choctaw Nation of Indians Knox assures the Choctaws of the affection and friendship of General Washington for the Choctaw nation and enlists their aid in the campaign against the hostile Indians north of the Ohio.
July 13, 1791 Peace Talks of the Six Nations Good Peter [not available] Good Peter discusses the peace talks of the Six Nations.
January 1, 1795 Formal Peace Alliance with Tribes at Sandusky Anthony Wayne Sachems Formal acceptance of U.S. to discuss peace with tribes of Sandusky. Hopes to create an alliance against those who caused mischief.
1789 Copy of Harmar's Speech to the Indians Josiah Harmar [not available] Harmar seeks peace between Indians and the "Thirteen Great Fires" (13 States) and offers wampum, reminded Indians that U.S. are obliged to protect and defend all friendly Indians. Virginia settlers seek to live in peace with Indians. Mentioned deception of Indians by enemies, murder on Ohio by unknown Indians, and that the U.S. traders will provide Indians anything they need.
July 14, 1791 Red Jacket's Speech of July 14th Red Jacket [not available] In his speech, Red Jacket discusses the peace talks and Indian agents.
December 18, 1786 Speech of United Indian Nations to Congress Chiefs of Wabash and Illinois Tribes [not available] The Indians are disappointed that they were not included in peace accord with Great Britain; wanted lasting peace. Indians excluded from meetings held regarding peace and property rights, desire future peace be reached with a united voice of the confederacy.
October 5, 1792 [Speech of John Heckewelder to the Delware chiefs and captains, Walendauwechen, Pachgantschihillas, Muchingwe, Pushees, and Captain Pipe.] John Heckenwelder [not available] Assurances of truth and peace. Offer to meet at the mouth of the Muskingum to talk out peace.