Viewing 1–25 of 663 documents: "counsel with the British"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
July 13, 1791 Red Jacket's Speech Red Jacket [not available] In his speech, Red Jacket discusses the peace talks, the British forces on the frontier, British and Indian relations, and Indian independence.
May 30, 1800 Certification of payment; Richard Harrison, Esquire, for retaining fee costs and counsel fees upon the cause of Houdin and Van Ingen, and for obtaining Habeas Corpus at Albany for Indian confined for murder William Simmons Benjamin Stoddert Certification of payment; $170 to Richard Harrison, Esquire, for retaining fee costs and counsel fees upon the cause of Houdin and Van Ingen, and for obtaining Habeas Corpus at Albany for an Indian confined for murder.
August 2, 1793 Verification of Reduction in Force Henry Knox Collector, Inspector, & Warden of the Port of Philadelphia The President has requested that the Collector, Inspector, and Warden board the British ship "Jane" and verify whether the reduction in force nas actually been carried out as specified to the British Consul General. The captain of the ship claims that the additional hands are real British subjects but proof of that statement is required.
July 15, 1794 Abandonment of the Territory of the State Thomas Mifflin George Washington Governor Mifflin expresses his strong objections to the abandonment of a great portion of the territory of his State to the Six Nations of Indians as provided for by the Council held at Fort Le Beouf.
1796 Description of British gun ship War Department [not available] Describes a British gun ship.
November 16, 1796 Pledges Allegiance to Warriors; Refers to work with British and Americans [not available] [not available] Refers to battles fought. Reports on new relationships with Whites, including false agents. Also fought for the British and worked with British Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Can produce testimonial from the Americans. Pledges allegiance to his true brethren, Indian warriors.
April 30, 1795 Regarding Book of Regulations in British Navy Timothy Pickering Captain Samuel Nicholson Pickering informs Captain Nicholson, who evidently borrowed the Book of Regulations for the British Navy, that he would like it returned when the time approaches for manning the frigates.
1794 British fort at Sandusky [not available] [not available] General Israel Chapin informs Knox that the British have begun to erect a fort at Sandusky. The British are much alarmed at the garrisoning of Presqu' Isle, and endeavor to persuade the Indians that the property at that place was fraudulently purchased.
November 1796 On Breaking Alliance with British, and Establishing Friendship with United States Blue Jacket Chief of the Shawnees President of the United States Indian chief Blue Jacket, of the Shawnees, relates how he and his people once fought for the British, having been urged to do so by them; now cites deception by the British and wishes only friendship with the Americans. Submits a testimonial of friendship with the English king; now states that he will throw that one away in return for a similar document from the U.S. President.
February 15, 1797 Enclosing a memorandum on British block house James McHenry Robert Liston Encloses a memorandum on the construction of a British block house in American territory.
August 22, 1794 British post at the Miami William Campbell Anthony Wayne Major William Campbell, commander of an allegedly illegal British fort along the banks of the Miami, responds to Major General Anthony Wayne's assertion that the erection of the post was an act of hostility and aggression. States that he does not want conflict with the United States, but that Wayne's letter was insulting to the British flag and King.
February 28, 1793 Relations with British in Canada Henry Knox William Hull Secretary Knox discusses treaty proceedings and the error in designating the place of treaty, attributable to interpreter error. Mentions Canada Governor Simcoe and his passage of the United States Commissioners from Niagara to Sandusky. Advises to keep the peace with the British in Canada. States "the United States are at perfect peace with the British Government."
June 9, 1797 Reports Return from Sea; Exchange with Pickering and British Officer William Vans Murray James McHenry Reports safe landing after two months at sea. Reports exchange with a British officer and Pickering.
February 28, 1795 British Post Built on Miamis Timothy Pickering Thomas Jefferson Enclosed depositions sent from Gen. Wayne relative to the British post recently established on the Miamis.
May 8, 1797 Regarding the care of British deserters James McHenry Charles Lee Request for the Attorney General's opinion on how to handle the care of three British deserters under Vice Admiral Vanderput. McHenry raises the question of sovereignty and weighs the various reactions of Britain in the event of the United States offering the deserters protection.
October 20, 1799 British Conduct; William Augustus Bowles Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Hawkins disturbed by British conduct. Notes that by sending Bowles into the U.S. to meet with Indians, Great Britain is complicit in disturbing peace of the nation.
September 5, 1795 EXTRACT: Governor's Opinion on Capture of Seamen by British Arthur Fenner Timothy Pickering Letter assured innocence of Captain Home, and dispelled rumors regarding capture of U.S. Seamen by British ship of war, Africa.
February 15, 1797 Summary of intelligence gathered on a British post James McHenry Timothy Pickering Informs the Secretary of State of the erection of a British post on American lands; requests that the evacuation of the post by the British appear voluntary and not done through diplomatic means.
July 25, 1794 Status of British Sailing Vessel Henry Knox Henry Lee Knox writes regarding British ship striped of its sails and the ramifications, along with general commentary on neutrality.
August 1, 1793 COPY Assurances Regarding British Vessel Phineas Bond Henry Knox Bond replies to Knox's letter of July 31 on behalf of the British Minister. He assures Knox that he respects the US Government, and that the British vessel being investigated by the US is not augmenting its arsenal, merely repairing what it already had. The guns on the ship are to protect the cargo and the ship, not to engage in warfare, and are required by insurance. Further, the master of the...
April 17, 1794 Detainment by French Henry Knox Henry Lee Status of detainees reported as settled between Sec. of State and British Minister.
February 7, 1797 Discussion of U.S. and British Land Claims Around Detroit John Wilkins, Jr. James McHenry Discusses use of land at the site of the town of Detroit, including original British plans for the site. Discusses a shipyard there, etc.
April 5, 1794 Regarding the British ship "William" Edmund Randolph [not available] The Secretary of State encloses papers regarding the British ship "William," a prize to a French vessel of war. Randolph is of the opinion that it is not proved that the ship was taken within the protection of American coasts, and therefore the ship ought to be delivered up to the captors.
August 3, 1796 Concerning the Saint Croix dispute James McHenry Timothy Pickering Discusses the St. Croix dispute over the boundary line between British Canada and the United States. McHenry disagrees with Pickering's assertion that the British commissioner must fulfill certain preliminary conditions before arbitration.
June 30, 1795 Treaty with British Timothy Pickering Anthony Wayne Cannot transmit treaty b/w British and Mr. Jay due to Senate negotiations on some articles within the treaty, but believes senators that were against its ratification would transmit copies to the newspapers. Noted promotions of several men and the suggestion that rankings be changed.