Viewing 1–25 of 805 documents: "captains examined on oath"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
May 9, 1796 The duty of this post is considerable... Michael Kalteisen Samuel Hodgdon Captain Kalteisen discusses his many burdonsome responsibilities at Fort Johnson and advises Hodgdon that he has been sick and absent from his post so he cannot be blamed for any mistakes that were made.
August 25, 1784 Certification that officers have taken oath of allegiance to the state of Pennsylvania Josiah Harmar President John Dickinson Harmar reports that his officers have taken the oath of allegiance to the state of Pennsylvania.
July 24, 1788 Certificate of oath of Alliegance Unknown Author [not available] Joseph Cone took oath of allegiance to U.S..
February 17, 1798 Oath for the Inspectors of Clothing for the Current Year Samuel Hodgdon James McHenry Letter, encloses Oath of the Inspectors of the Clothing; alludes to Army uniforms.
September 18, 1800 Beckwith Confirms the Quality of the Coal Joseph Williams [not available] Elisha Beckwith certifies that as a blacksmith in business in the City of Hartford, he has examined the Virginian coal laying on the banks of that city and has found it of good quality.
June 24, 1794 Captain Thomas Truxton Oath of Allegiance sworn before Richard Peters. Captain Thomas Truxtun [not available] Captain Thomas Truxton appointed a Captain of one of the frigates to be built, oath of allegiance before Richard Peters. Truxton would go on to command the USS Constellation and the USS President.
February 27, 1798 Oath of Office of the Inspector of Shoes Samuel Hodgdon Nathan Jones Letter, encloses oath of office for the Inspector of Shoes.
March 1, 1793 Copy of document [not available] [not available] Document, Memorandum providing opinion on the time, place and manner of taking the President's oath of office.
March 1, 1793 Knox and Hamilton offer opinions about oath of office to Washington Henry Knox George Washington Knox and Hamilton send their opinions regarding the oath of office to Washington. Letter, encloses opinions about the time, place and manner of the President taking the oath of office.
March 1, 1793 Time, Place, and Manner for Taking the Oath of Office. Henry Knox George Washington Three cabinet members provide their opinions on the time, place, and manner in which the President-elect [Washington] should take the oath of office.
February 28, 1798 Oath of Office of Benjamin Scott Samuel Hodgdon Nathan Jones Letter, encloses oath for hat inspector Benjamin Scott; discusses contract to provide hats to United States.
March 9, 1801 Oath of Allegiance of Lieutenant John J. Powell John J. Powell [not available] Document, oath of allegiance to the United States of America
May 2, 1799 Want of Clothing & The Officers' Oath Alexander Hamilton James McHenry Hamitlon acknowledges McHenry's letter informing him of the want of clothing and blankets and encloses the oath to be taken by officers enter the Army.
February 15, 1792 [Oath of Alliegance] Andrew Blad [not available] Oath of allegiance required for enlisted soldiers Andrew Blad and Robert Sutherland.
July 18, 1794 Appointment of Captain James Seaver [Sever] as Captain of one of the frigates Henry Knox Captain James Seaver Knox informs Captain James Seaver [Sever] that the President of United States General George Washington has appointed Seaver [Sever] to be Captain of one of the frigates to be built. Knox encloses a list of Captains according to rank. He notes that since Seaver's friends have applied for the appointment, he presumes that Seaver will accept. He is directed to repair to Baltimore by 1 September,...
March 7, 1791 Census of the People South of the Ohio River William Blount [not available] Governor Blount explains the process by which the Captains of Infantry are to take the census of the people in their districts within the territory of the United States living south of the Ohio River.
February 27, 1793 Time, Place, and Manner for the Oath of Qualification George Washington Alexander Hamilton Washington asks the four members of his Cabinet to provide their opinions as to the time, place, and manner in which the President-elect [i.e., himself] should take the oath of qualification.
February 6, 1799 Relative Rank of Truxton, Talbot, & Dale Benjamin Stoddert Alexander Hamilton Stoddert discusses the circumstances surrounding the relative rank of Navy Captains Truxton, Talbot, and Dale. He criticizes the President for continuing more captains than there are frigates to accommodate them.
August 7, 1790 Oath of the interpreteur in the treaty with the Creeks. Joseph Cornell [not available] Document, Oath of the interpreter in Treaty with Creeks.
July 1, 1794 Oath of Captain John Barry Captain John Barry Unknown Recipient Oath of Captain John Barry, known as the "Father of the American Navy," swearing allegiance to the Unitied States and its Constitution. Barry was appointed superintendent commander of what would become the frigate United States.
September 18, 1800 Elisha Beckwith Certifies Virginia Coal. Joseph Williams [not available] Elisha Beckwith certifies that he carries on the blacksmith's business and has examined the Virginia coal lying on the bank of Hartford. He finds the coal of good quality and "merchantable" for a blacksmith's use.
October 23, 1794 William Doughty clerk of shipyard Philadelphia Oath of office witnessed by Hilary Baker William Doughty [not available] Doughty oath of allegiance as clerk of shipyard port of Philadelphia.
April 26, 1799 Proper Rule for Promotions in the Army Alexander Hamilton James McHenry Hamilton affirms that there can only be one rule for promotions in the Army and notes that distributing the older Captains among the four regiments of the old establishment may ameliorate possible anquish on their part.
May 20, 1796 Examination of cannons at Cecil Furnace to determine suitability for service [not available] Mr. Hughes Captains Barry and Truxton and Mr Da Costa examined 35 cannons and found 29 to be suitable for service.
June 5, 1794 Letter to Captains Barry, Nicholson, Talbot, Barney, Dale, and Truxton appointing them Captains of the first six frigates constructed Henry Knox [not available] Regarding Captains commissions. President of United States General George Washington, with advice and consent of Senate, has appointed these Captains to command ships provided under Act of Naval Armament. Relative rank in following order: Barry, Nicholson, Talbot, Barney, Dale, Truxton.