Viewing 1–25 of 228 documents: "blue Yorkshire cloth"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 21, 1800 Request to Deliver to Francis Brown, Quantity of Cloth and Materials for Coats Samuel Hodgdon John Harris Request to deliver to Francis Brown, quantity of cloth and materials for cutting out and completing infantry and musician sergeant's coats
February 12, 1789 [Estimate of Expenses for the Treaty with the Cherokees agreed to February 12, 1789.] Unknown Author Unknown Recipient List of items and their estimated values for a treaty with the Cherokee Nation.
[not available] Letter Signed [not available] [not available] Letter, directs delivery of cloth and materials for uniform coats.
March 25, 1800 Timber from Algiers Richard O'Brien Captain Smith A list of items to be provided to the Dey in Algiers in exchange for timber for the United States. 400 yards of cloth are to be handed to Secretary of State Timothy Pickering.
June 9, 1794 Knox requisitions supplies Henry Knox [not available] Stores, describes goods for treating with Indians; mentions Treaty of 1793.
February 19, 1789 Shipment of American Cloth to the Washingtons Henry Knox George Washington Knox informs Washington that the requested cloth was shipped by stage today. Knox identifies the cloth as 13.5 yards of 3/4 wide bottle green cloth of the Hartford manufacture. Knox also notes the price of the cloth is reasonable and the route of shipment will proceed via Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Alexandria.
July 5, 1794 Sail cloth manufactured in Boston Benjamin Lincoln Alexander Hamilton Letter to the Secretary of Treasury stating that the sail cloth manufactured in Boston is to be preferred imported sail cloth from Europe. The writer states that Boston manufactured cloth is less liable to mildew, owing to the sizing which in America is made from animal substances and not as is common in Europe from vegetables.
March 28, 1785 Procurement of Cloth Benjamin Lincoln Samuel Hodgdon Benjamin Lincoln sends to Samuel Hodgdon a letter requesting the procurement of cloth. Requested method of reimbursing Hodgdon for the cost of supplies.
March 29, 1797 Delivery of Cloth James McHenry John Harris Orders to deliver cloth to Mr. Francis for making forage bags for cavalry.
February 1, 1796 Estimate of expences for sundry Mohawk Indians Israel Chapin Jr [not available] Fiscal, describes expences for sundry Mohawks.
June 1794 Receipt for federal stores returned by Israel Chapin, Jr. [not available] Israel Chapin Jr Isreal Chapin Jr, acting on behalf of his father, returns stores used in trade and diplomacy with the Six Nations
February 12, 1789 American Cloth Available in New York Henry Knox George Washington Knox responds to Washington's request for American cloth. Knox informs Washington that American cloth is inferior in quality to English cloth Knox also states that he has recently been ill.
December 2, 1799 Memorandum of supplies wanted at Detroit David Strong Samuel Hodgdon Encloses memorandum of supplies wanted; requests that the articles be forwarded to Detroit early in the spring.
May 2, 1796 Pay, Subsistence, & Forage of Lieutenant William K. Blue William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $45.50 is due Lieutenant William K. Blue for his pay, subsistence, and forage, and for subsisting his waiter, during April 1796.
June 28, 1794 Domestic or Foreign Sail Cloth for Frigates Alexander Hamilton Benjamin Lincoln Hamilton inquires as to whether domestic of foreign sail cloth should be used on the frigates. He would prefer the use of domestic cloth but it must be really good.
June 30, 1794 Sail cloth for frigates Alexander Hamilton William Seton Secretary Hamilton asks William Seton whether domestic or foreign sail cloth ought to be used for American frigates.
April 13, 1797 Lieutanant Blue's pay, subsistence, and forage William Simmons William K. Blue Notifies Lieutenant Blue that pay, subsistence, and forage will be paid to Mr. Cumming per Blue's order. The charges for subsisting his "waiter" cannot be paid by the War Department per the Secretary of War's directions. Such soldiers must draw their rations "in kind, agreeably to Law."
June 30, 1794 Quality of sail cloth Alexander Hamilton Brigadier General Otho H. Williams Secretary Hamilton asks Brigadier General Otho Williams what experience has decided in regard to the quality of the sail cloth which has been used for the cutter under Williams' direction.
April 22, 1796 Pay, Subsistence, & Forage of Lieutenant Blue William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $52.64 is due Lieutenant Blue for his pay, subsistence, and forage for March 1796 and for subsisting his waiter, Private John Veasy of the 4th Sub Legion, March 13-31.
October 6, 1796 Pay transfered as requested William Simmons William K. Blue Notifies Blue that per his request the balance of his account was paid to Messrs. George and Edward Thompson.
December 8, 1797 Certification of payments; account of Lieutenant Blue William Simmons James McHenry Certification that $37.06 is due William H. Blue, late lieutenant of the Cavalry, being the balance of his pay, subsistence, and forage to May 9, 1797, the day of his resignation.
August 4, 1796 Receipt requested William K. Blue William Simmons Requests a receipt for recruiting service money he returned to Simmons. Cited in Simmons to Blue 08/13/1796.
December 22, 1796 Pay, Subsistence, & Forage of Lieutenant William K. Blue William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $85.96 is due Lieutenant William K. Blue, being his pay, subsistence, and forage, and the subsistence of his waiter, for October and November 1796.
November 2, 1800 Blankets to Sell Edward Wright John Harris [Rowmalls] and blankets received, more requested for sale.
July 2, 1796 Warrant No. 45 James McHenry William K. Blue William K. Blue, late a lieutenant in the Cavalry of the United States, must pay Samuel Meredith, Treasurer of the United States, $360 being the amount placed in his hands for the recruiting service