Viewing 1–25 of 109 documents: "Yenyahhiya, no heart"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 7, 1791 Order in Favor of Thomas Heart Jonathan Heart Joseph Howell Jonathan Heart warns Howell that the order claimed by Thomas Heart should not be paid.
May 3, 1796 Pay of Private Joseph Walcutt, Captain Jonathan Heart's Company William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $23.07 is due Joseph Walcutt, late a private in Captain Jonathan Heart's Company 1st Regiment, being his pay from January 1 to June 23, 1791, the day of his discharge.
February 18, 1796 Pay of Corporal John Bartlet, of Captain Jonathan Heart's Company 1st US Regiment William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $11 is due John Bartlet, being his pay as late Corporal in Captain Jonathan Heart's Company 1st US Regiment from Jan. 1 to April 30, 1791, the day of his discharge.
February 18, 1796 Pay of Private Amos Seymour, of Captain Jonathan Heart's Company, 1st US Regiment William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that six dollars is due Amos Seymour, late private in Captain Jonathan Heart's Company 1st US Regiment, being his pay for Jan. 1 to April 1, 1791, the day of his discharge.
February 18, 1796 Additional Pay of Amos Seymour, private in Captain Jonathan Heart's Company, 1st US regiment William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $12 is due Amos Seymour, late a private in Captain Jonathan Heart's Company, 1st US regiment, being the balance of his pay from Jan. 1 to April 1, 1791 the day of his discharge.
April 27, 1787 Concerning Indians and the Seneca Nation William Butler Josiah Harmar Col. Butler writes to Col. Harmar on Indian Chiefs and the Seneca nation. The Congress has declared Harmar to be the commanding officers, find Captain Heart, and build a fort at Venango.
October 29, 1787 Report from French Creek Jonathan Heart Henry Knox Heart gives his report on the events occurring in the vicinity of French Creek with particular emphasis on the activities of the local tribes who are anxious to continue trading with Americans.
February 18, 1796 Additional Pay of John Bartlet William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $20 is due John Bartlet, being his pay as late Corporal in Captain Jonathan Heart's Company 1st US Regiment from Jan. 1 to April 30, 1791, the day of his discharge.
October 18, 1787 Events of Immediate Consequence; Jonathan Heart Henry Knox Heart reports on the events of immediate consequence occurring in the vicinity of French Creek with particular emphasis on the actions of the local Indian tribes.
March 24, 1801 Explanation of Departure from Washington as Mourning for Son's Death John Adams Samuel Dexter Addresses an apparent inquiry into his sudden and unannounced departure from the capital before the inauguration of Thomas Jefferson by stating that he left in the midst of mourning the recent death of his son Charles Adams. Reports quietude in New England.
August 14, 1800 Lyman is Dangerously Sick, Etc. Joseph Williams Samuel Hodgdon Williams will contact Major Buel to request a return of all articles wanted for recruits. A return of the articles from Oxford will soon be furnished if Williams' health allows it. Samuel Lyman is dangerously sick. The palpitations of his heart cause the doctors to suspect his case may be incurable.
April 26, 1788 Outlines Travel Plans; Preparations for Indian Treaty Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Outlines travel plans from Muskingum, to Venango, to Captain Heart's post, where he assures that he will do everything in his power to assist this company. Believes this group of people to be quite industrious and capable. Nicholson, the interpreter and messenger, believes the Indians will be late in assembling for the treaty and will insist on the Ohio River as boundary. Encloses monthly return.
1792 Brighten the Chain of Friendship Rufus Putnam [not available] Putnam invites the chiefs of the western tribes to travel to Philadelphia, at government expense, to attempt to reach a settlement that will avoid war between them and the United States.
June 10, 1793 Orders to go about the heart of country to visit the Creek leadership Henry Knox James Seagrove Secretary of War Knox conveys orders from President of United States General George Washington to Creek Indian Agent James Seagrove to go into the heart of the country. Capitalize on friendship of White Lieutenant, Mad Dog of Upper Creeks and White Bird, King of the Cussetahs. Purpose should be to demonstrate peaceful intentions of United States and to emphasize the existence of Creek Nation...
July 24, 1792 Letter to the Wyachtenos and other tribes living on the Wabash River Rufus Putnam [not available] "Brothers: I am on my way to you from the great council fire of the United States, where the great and good chief, General Washington, resides. I am coming with the wishes of his heart to you which are very good, and which I hope will make your heart rejoice, when you hear them. Brothers: Out of love to you I am come this long way. I wish you to become a happy people; and, believe me, nothing...
September 27, 1800 A Most Singular Burglary Joseph Williams Samuel Hodgdon Williams ponders the motives behind the burglary of duplicate payrolls which would seem of little value to anyone other than public officials.
September 17, 1791 Warren writes to Knox Major General Warren Henry Knox Letter, Warren encloses letter to Knox.
July 25, 1798 Recommendation of Mr. Whitney for the Corps of Artillery Constant Freeman Samuel Hodgdon Mr. Whitney has a great desire to enter the Corps of Artillery and Freeman recommends him to Hodgdon as an honest man who has faithfully discharged his duty to his country and possesses a heart filled with sentiments of honor and integrity .
February 14, 1784 Cash and Receipts Major John Sumner John Pierce Notes delivery of money in cash after exchange (presumably of notes). Requests receipts for the sum delivered.
May 22, 1800 Employment of Pourcheresse in the Public Store Joseph Williams Samuel Hodgdon Mr. Pourcheresse and his family are leaving for Philadelphia in search of employment. Their destitute and distressing situation claims sympathy to the feeling heart. Since he is an honest man attached to the government, Hodgdon is asked to find him employment in a public store.
February 14, 1798 Money and I Have Become Strangers Jeremiah Fischer Samuel Hodgdon After a seige of nine months, Fischer finds himself so debilitated as to be rarely able to walk across the room. He and money have become strangers so he asks Hodgdon to settle his account. He has promised to pay a Negro Dunn on the morrow but, like all Dutchmen, Dunn's heart is rarely touched with the finer feelings of humanity. Fischer has not one dollar in his house at the present time.
August 1, 1789 Knox discusses settlement of Waldo Patent Henry Knox Daniel Cony Letter, advises settlers on Waldo Patent.
July 29, 1799 The principle you suggest cannot be put into practice. Alexander Hamilton Benjamin Stoddert "The principle you suggest for my consideration, though if it could be introduced it would work well, cannot in my opinion be put into practice. It would contravene too much pretension rooted as well in the human heart as in unconquerable prejudices of the military state by which expression I include the naval department. Carrying in the very fact an avowed preference humiliating to the pride of...
June 15, 1793 Living in Gores of Blood Double-head Secretary Smith Double-head demands an explanation for the recent attack on the Cherokees that resulted in nine deaths.
March 4, 1791 Knox appoints Doughty to command Henry Knox John Doughty Letter, informs Doughty of appointment to regiment command.