Viewing 1–25 of 134 documents: "Wyandots"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
November 4, 1794 Peace with the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Wyandot Chief Major General Anthony Wayne delivers speech to the Wyandots, who have pleaded for peace. Wayne states, "I hope and trust that your eyes are now opened." Urges that a "permanent and lasting peace" may be established upon establishing a just boundary.
October 14, 1799 Indian Affairs are in a Critical Situation Arthur St. Clair James McHenry Governor St. Clair discusses recent conferences with several Shawanese chiefs and with the Wyandots; He is concerned that these tribes may soon break off relations with the United States.
July 12, 1786 Enclosure of sundry letters and request of Scotosh, son of Half King of Wyandots Charles Thomson Henry Knox Thompson transmits sundry letters. Refers to Indian Scotosh, son of Half King of Wyandots, who wishes to visit France.
November 3, 1794 Speech of the Wyandots Chiefs of the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Speech of a Wyandot chief, delivered to General Anthony Wayne at Greenville. The Wyandots plea for peace, and claim to be determined "to bury the hatchet and scalping knife deep in the ground." Asks that the United States "have pity on us, and leave us a small piece of land to build a town upon." Mourn that there is no longer sufficient land to live and hunt upon.
December 13, 1788 Arrival of Five Nations, Senecas, Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatamies, Sacs Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Previous night, the Five Nations, Senecas, Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatamies, Sacs arrived. Brant with the Mohawks turned back upon receiving St. Clair's message. Brant did everything to prevent the rest from coming forward, without effect.
November 5, 1794 Peace with hostile Indians Anthony Wayne Unknown Recipient General Anthony Wayne regarding the establishment of a "permanent and lasting peace" between the United States and "hostile tribes of Indians." Talks of a treaty with the Wyandots. Also talks of "some of the bad white people" who have instigated conflict.
January 26, 1790 On the Wyandots, Major Doughty's peace mission, and attack by Indians within twelve miles of Danville, at Carpenter's Station Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Expresses confidence in friendly disposition of Wyandots; their influence over other tribes is considerable. Discusses Major Doughty's peace mission to the southern Indians, the establishment of a post at Mussel Shoals, the attitude of the Choctaws and Chickasaws to this event, the number of men required to man this post. Will soon be leaving for Kaskaskia. Reports on attack by Indians within...
May 4, 1798 Goods for the Wyandots & Pottawatomies, Etc. Samuel Hodgdon Isaac Craig Hodgdon discusses the Indian goods intended for the Wyandot and Pottowatomie tribes. Colonel Winthrop Sargent apparently will be confirmed by the Senate as Governor of the Mississippi government.
August 13, 1794 Anthony Wayne's Declaration to the Indian Nations Anthony Wayne Nations of Indians Northwest of the Ohio This is General Wayne's declaration to the Delawares, Shawnees, Miamis, Wyandots, and all other Nations of Indians northwest of the Ohio in which he offers the friendly hand of peace and promises to preserve them and their helpless women and children from the danger of famine.
July 20, 1786 Report of Mr. Philip Liebert regarding intentions of the savages Philip Liebert [not available] Liebert was ordered by Major Doughty to pass through the Delaware and Shawnee towns on the Miami and at Sandusky. Shawanese not disposed to peace. The Delawares and Wyandots were more kind and friendly.
September 25, 1794 Speech to the chiefs and warriors of Sandusky Anthony Wayne Chiefs of the Sandusky Speech from Major General Anthony Wayne to the chiefs and warriors of Sandusky, whom the United States happens to be friendly with. Mostly propaganda about how General Wayne is concerned about their distressed position, and that they should follow the Wyandots in trusting the United States.
July 13, 1788 Speech to the Chiefs of Wyandots Arthur St. Clair Chiefs of the Wyandots A Black Cloud has arisen in the North and has darkened prospects of completing good work. It may blow over. Refers to speech sent to Chiefs at Tawa and mouth of Detroit River. Asks for assistance in removing the cloud.
September 27, 1794 Plea for Peace John Williams Anthony Wayne This is a plea for peace after five years of war. It has been the misfortune of the peaceful Wyandots to have been displaced from their land during this period. This has left many of John Williams' countrymen in a state of despair and he will do all in his power to gain peace.
July 9, 1793 Remarks of Federal Commissioners and Indian Chiefs at Sandusky Conference Captain Joseph Brant [not available] Council convened on 9 July 1793 at Navy Hall Niagara. Captain Brant, interpreter furnished opening remarks of good will and conducted ceremony with strings and belts. Chiefs state that the Western Indians are of one mind, and if they can agree with whites, peace may ensue. Prior treaties were not binding because they did not account for all the tribes as one. Chief then provide the nations in...
August 8, 1793 Journal entry regarding disposition of proceedings of Indian Council at Miami relative to peace and war Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky [not available] Captain Hendrick's men report that the Indian Council at Miami is for peace, with exception of Shawanese, Wyandots, Miamis and Delawares, who eventually yielded to the peaceful opinions of others. Commissioners should receive invitation from confederated nations to meet council at mouth of Miami River this week
December 22, 1795 Treaty of Greenville George Washington Unknown Recipient Peace treaty between United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Chipewas, Potowatamies, Eel-River, Weeas Kickapoos, Piankashaws, Kaskaskias, and Miamis. Prisoner release negotiated and borders decided upon.
May 2, 1789 A report on the Treaty of Fort Harmar, concluded with several of the Indian Nations Arthur St. Clair George Washington St. Clair presents the treaties concluded with several of the Indian Nations in January 1789. Discusses extension of northern boundary to the 41st degree of north latitude, which was not accomplished for fear of defeating the peace process. The negotiation was tedious and tiresome. There are still some ill-disposed tribes. There were separate treaties with the Six Nations and Wyandots because of...
January 18, 1789 Report on the Treaty of Fort Harmar Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Reports that the business related to the Treaty of Fort Harmar has finished. They have renewed their former engagements; that is the Six Nations, Wyandots, Chippewas, Delawares, Pottawatamies, and Sacs. They seem well satisfied. States that one good consequence is that the confederacy is broken and Joseph Brant has lost his influence. River is presently frozen and communications by water cut off....
August 28, 1794 Examination of Antoine Lassell Unknown Author Unknown Recipient Examination of Antoine Lassell, a native of Canada, and a volunteer in Captain Caldwell's company of refugees, friends and allies of the hostile Indians. Lassell reports the numbers of various Indian tribes, including the Delawares, Miamies, Shawanese, Tawas, and Wyandots.
May 28, 1800 Instructions for Indian Presents James McHenry John Harris Indian nations mentioned to receive annuities from the United States include Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Miamis, Patawatomies, Shawanees, Creeks, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Eel River, Weeas, Piankishaws, and Kickapoos, with amounts (in value of goods) listed. Also lists any specific goods meant for the Indians -- if the value of the mentioned goods does not reach the total amount to be...
April 9, 1791 Attending the Council at Buffalo Creek Captain O'Beel [not available] Indian Head-Man O'Beel speaks of his attempts to ally himself with the Wyandots who have bad men advising them go go to war with the whites. Despite recent misdeeds by whites against his people, he still intends to attend the council fire at Buffalo Creek where the great men of different tribes are assembling.
July 7, 1788 Papers respectiong disposition of affairs on the Ohio River and Northwest Henry Knox Arthur St. Clair Knox transmits letter from Governor of Western Territory with message from Wyandots, Ottawas, and Chippawas, delivered by Captain Coon; a letter from Superintendent Indian Affairs, Northern District, dated Fort Pitt, 20 June 1788; Extract of letter from Brigadier General Harmar with reports from Lieutenant Armstrong and Lieutenant Spear.
May 1, 1791 Developments on Frontier Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Informant told St. Clair that Wyandots joined Shawnees and Delawares in alliance. Further details on military operations on frontier.
January 29, 1795 Religion Edmund Burke Wyandot Chief Speech to Wyandots regarding visit by Burke to discuss religion in village. Recommends moving village closer to Detroit and cabin to be occupied by Burke. Persuasive argument against joining "strangers".
March 8, 1791 Letter to General Knox Rufus Putnam Henry Knox This letter to Knox desribes Indian hostilities in the Ohio territory. The letter closes with a call for government troops to protect the inhabitants from the Indians.