Viewing 1–25 of 16,456 documents: "William Gray"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
March 23, 1798 Letter Citation Archibald Gray William Simmons Cited in Simmons to Gray 03/23/1798. Simmons provides instruction for submitting recruiting expenses to Lieutenant Gray.
July 31, 1799 Pay, Subsistence, and Forage for Robert Gray Robert Gray James McHenry Lieutenant Gray certifies that he has received $135.84 for his pay, subsistence and forage, to which is duly entitled.
March 22, 1800 Petition of Amelia Gray Amelia Gray Unknown Recipient Petition from Amelia Gray to an unknown recipient. Image not available. Possibly a widow looking for a settlement of her husband's account.
November 2, 1797 William Simmons discusses pay, finance and accounting with Ensign Gray William Simmons Archibald Gray William Simmons informs Ensign Archibald Gray that failure to settle his account with haste will result in placing his name among the delinquents.
June 13, 1786 Endorsement of certificate for John Gray Jonathan Nicholson Joseph Howell The author says that a friend has asked him to endorse a Certificate for between one and two hundred dollars in the name of John Gray and dated Dec. 2nd(?),1784. He wants to know where Gray lives in Pennsylvania and which Corps he served in.
May 1, 1799 Certification of payments; Lieutenant Robert Gray Peter Hagner James McHenry Certification that $140.75 is due Lieutenant Robert Gray of the cavalry for pay, subsistence and forage.
February 10, 1797 Closing Gray's account William Simmons Archibald Gray Requests that Ensign Gray provide his account and vouchers for monies received by him from Captain Thomas Lewis for the recruiting service so that Simmons can close his account
March 6, 1800 Petition of Amelia Gray Amelia Gary Unknown Recipient Petition of Amelia Gray to an unknown recipient. Image not available. Possibly a widow seeking to settle her husband's account.
March 30, 1798 Letter from the Accountant of the War Department William Simmons Archibald Gray Simmons provides instruction for submitting recruiting expenses to Lt. Gray.
March 14, 1793 Ann Gray's Account of the Murders of Moffitt and Herring Ann Gray E. Hubbard Sworn before E Hubbard, Justice of Peace, Mrs Ann Gray was at Robert Seagrove's store at Traders Hill on St Marys in the care of John Fleming when the robbery and murder took place on 11 March 1793. In the evening James Upton and John Galphin came to the store, followed by some Indians. A deerskin was purchased. Fleming got some rum for James Allen. There was shooting and commotion; Fleming and...
April 7, 1798 Letter from the Accountant of the War Department William Simmons Samuel Jackson Simmons discusses the claim of George Gray with Sen. Samuel Jackson.
1794 Potential war with Indians James Jordan Henry Gaither James Jordan writes Lieutenant Colonel commandant Henry Gaither that William Gray is spreading falsehoods about the likelihood of Indians going to war, and that his earlier letter expressing anxiety of this was therefore mistaken.
June 2, 1796 Pay & Subsistence of Lieutenant Robert Lee William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $45.20 is due Lieutenant Robert Lee, being the balance of his account for pay and subsistence through April 1796, payable to Robert Gray.
November 29, 1797 William Simmons discusses pay, finance and accounting with Dwight Foster William Simmons Dwight Foster William Simmons discusses the claim of Ann Gray with Dwight Foster.
August 1794 Receipt (illegible) John Gray [not available] Mostly illegible receipt signed by John Gray.
July 4, 1789 Lewis Gray requests that Knox forward this letter to Henry Jackson Lewis Gray Henry Knox Letter, encloses letter to Henry Jackson.
March 2, 1793 Orders from Secretary of War Henry Knox William Preston Secretary Knox orders Captain Preston to proceed to Point Pleasant, the mouth of the Great Henhawa River. He is to meet with Major General Anthony Wayne for further orders, then proceed with Lieutenant Bowyer, Lieutenant Craig, Ensign Gray and Ensign Sanklin.
June 22, 1786 Depreciation accounts and delivery of certificates Jonathan Nicholson Joseph Howell The author thanks the recipient for the information regarding Hughes and says that he delivered to Capt. James Smith his depreciation account. He will follow instructions and not deliver Certificates to the officers of Moylan's regiment from Virginia.
September 10, 1799 Deed for Beacon Island to John Gray Blount, Drawn by US Attorney W. Benjamin Woods, Delivered to Captain James Taylor Richard Dobbs Spaight James McHenry Letter, discusses deed to the United States for Beacon Island and encloses a bill of exchange for the purchase money. Warns of impending yellow fever.
December 8, 1798 List of Officers with Opinions on Their Possible Commissions Benjamin Goodhue Alexander Hamilton Goodhue called Harrison Gray Otis, Isaac Parker, Samuel Sewal, and Dwight Foster to offer their opinions on the list sent by Hamilton to Goodhue. Opinions appended and returned to Hamilton.
February 3, 1800 Letter from the Accountant of the War Department William Simmons Richard Dobbs Spaight Simmons requests the necessary vouchers to account for the purchase of Beacon Island in North Carolina. The Island was purchased from John Gray Blount.
July 12, 1793 Status Report From Fort Pitt Isaac Craig Henry Knox Major Craig forwards the following reports to Secretary Knox: a return of stores, an abstract of accounts, and all vouchers of disbursements. Craig indicates that a contractor successfully sued for his pay in Allegheny County Court.
January 5, 1798 William Simmons discusses pay, finance and accounting with Capt. Kibley William Simmons Ephraim Kibley William Simmons informs Capt. Kibley that Sgt. Archibald Grey's receipt has been passed to his credit.
January 16, 1797 Pay & Subsistence of Lieutenant Robert Lee William Simmons James McHenry Certification that $66.64 is due Lieutenant Robert Lee, being his pay and subsistence for November and December 1796.
August 3, 1794 Fortificiations at Alexandria John Vermonnet Henry Knox Informs Secretary Knox that after waiting nearly two months for the necessary materials to begin work at Alexandria, he is still without them, and has found it necessary to retire to Annapolis to visit what has been done there during his absence. Desires that he may not be blamed for the delay.