Viewing 1–25 of 3,647 documents: "Vocabulary of the Principal Words in the Language of the Creek Indians"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
February 12, 1799 Vocabulary & Grammar of the Chippewa Language for Dr. Barton [not available] Samuel Hodgdon Dr. Brown laments that he hasn't heard from Hodgdon and talks of having the best vocabulary & language of the Chippewa Indians on Earth. Due to hard service in the dismal swamp, his health has suffered.
March 13, 1791 State of the Creek Nation James Casey Henry Knox Comprehensive treatment of every aspect of the culture and lives of the Creek Nation of Indians in 1790-1791. Includes transcript of a journal. 132 page document.
March 6, 1791 Alarm on the Frontier Isaac Craig Henry Knox Major Craig warms of hostile Indians marauding in the region surrounding Fort Pitt. In one incident, three men and one woman were killed by Indians who called to them in English.
March 23, 1791 Murder of Friendly Indians Henry Knox Arthur St. Clair General St. Clair is to ensure that those guilty of the murder of friendly Indians are quickly brought to trial and punished. He is to meet with the principal chiefs of the Senacas to assure them that justice will be done and that compensation for loss of property is due the friends and relatives of the deceased Indians.
April 29, 1791 Report on living amongst the Creek Indians Caleb Swan Henry Knox Caleb Swan accounts for his time and travels among the Creek Indians. He has learned a bit of their language, but once McGillivray departed for his winter home in Florida, he found it intolerable to remain, and thus left early.
December 2, 1796 Transcript of Talks Between Different Indian Chiefs & Secretary of War on Necessity of Peace Between Tribes James McHenry [not available] McHenry, on behalf of President Washington, advises all the Indians assembled to not go to war with each other. The representatives of the tribes then comment on this advice and on peace-making among themselves; the loss of land, the fate of Indian prisoners held by other tribes, and the shared use of hunting grounds are discussed. Much is made of the union of all the Indian nations as...
February 25, 1794 Council proceedings at Buffalo Creek General Israel Chapin Henry Knox General Israel Chapin encloses the Buffalo Creek council proceedings to the Secretary of War. Present at the council were representatives from the United States and Upper Canada, along with the principal leaders of the Six Nations.
July 25, 1793 Information & Opinion Relative to the Creek Indians Henry Knox George Washington "I have the honor to submit the information and opinion of General Pickens relatively to the Creek indians. If there should be any other points on which it would be necessary to request his information or opinion, he will be ready to afford the same."
June 18, 1794 Proceedings of the Six Nations at Buffalo creek Chiefs Six Nations Unknown Recipient Proceedings of a Council holden at Buffalo creek, by the Six Nations of Indians. The principal attendees included sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Six Nations, along with General Israel Chapin and some interpreters. The Indians lodge a complaint against the injustice of some of the actions of militant Americans upon their people and lands. "We are in distress," one of them said, "A number of...
September 8, 1796 Instructions to Indian Agent to the Creeks & Other Indians South of the Ohio James McHenry Benjamin Hawkins Official commission and instructions for Benjamin Hawkins, as Principal Temporary Agent for Indian Affairs, within the Indian Nations South of the Ohio, and North of the Territorial Line. Includes instructions for managing trade, seeing to the sale of land between Indians & the states (principally Georgia), overseeing boundaries, etc.
March 21, 1793 Deposition by eleven inhabitants of Glynn County Inhabitants of Glynn County Georgia W. Urquhart Extract from files of Ex Dept. William Urquhart. Inhabitants' report being robbed and plundered by Creek Indians, including cattle and horses. They say the Creek Indians have been treated kindly. Another extract comes from Mr Cooke to the Honorable Judge Houston dated at Williamsburg 21 March 1793 indicating that amount of cattle stolen around 2000.
September 20, 1789 Regarding planned visit from Principal Chiefs and request for private meeting Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department McGillivray informs of a visit from Principal Chiefs, accompanied by interpreter Derezeau. He asks for a private meeting with one or two of the commissioners.
March 21, 1793 Citizens of Glynn County make criminal allegations against Creek Indians Citizens of Glynn County [not available] Collective statement given by citizens of Glynn County, Georgia that alleges various criminal conduct on the part of local Creek Indians.
April 10, 1792 Indian Alliance Against the Americans Daniel Thornbury General James Robertson In his deposition to James Robertson, Daniel Thornbury describes, among other events, the attempt by the Creeks to form an alliance with the Chickasaws and Choctaws to fight the Americans.
July 3, 1790 Colonel McGillivray and principal chiefs of Creek Nations, passing through Philadelphia Henry Knox Thomas Mifflin Colonel Alexander McGillivray and principal chiefs of Creek Nations, are to be passing through Philadelphia on their way to New York. President Washington desires that they experience every proper civility and kindness.
July 5, 1793 Killing of Creek Indians at Spanish Creek & Detention of Indians at Seagrove's Home James Seagrove Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Seagrove recounts the incident whereby Creek Indians were reportedly mistakenly killed by whites at Spanish Creek. Points out that David Cornell was killed by same man whose brother Cornell killed past winter on frontier of Cumberland. Expresses hope that matter can still be settled peacefully. Seagrove then reports on detention of Indians at his house, including the incident whereby one Indian...
March 28, 1791 Assurances of Justice Henry Knox Arthur St. Clair Knox stresses the need to assure the Seneca Chiefs that the murderers of the friendly Indians will be brought to justice and that liberal compensation for the loss of property will be provided to the friends and relations of the deceased.
July 14, 1791 Good Peter's Speech Good Peter [not available] In his speech, Good Peter discusses the strength of the United States, peace, cultivated lands, the civilizing of Indians, and Indian literacy.
November 22, 1792 Peace & Friendship with the United States James Seagrove Henry Knox After his meeting with eighteen Creek chiefs, Seagrove confirms that the Creeks have no interest in joining the northern tribes against the forces of the United States.
August 22, 1796 Compensation & Expenses of Benjamin Hawkins William Simmons James McHenry Simmons certifies that $936.92 is due Benjamin Hawkins, being the balance of his compensation and expenses as Commissioner for negotiating a treaty with the Creek Nation of Indians from April 19 to August 19, 1796 and expenses returning home.
February 23, 1798 Account of Execution of Indian Chief and Request for Policy Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Letters between governor and Hawkins outlined and numbered. Hawkins recounted an ambush of U.S. officers, and complaints of white neighbors of Tuskeegee Tustunnagau and other Creek Indians. Tuskeegee put to death after civil trial. Blacksmith's employed by U.S. for the use of the Creek Indians, Hawkins requests ruling on the responsibility of payment.
December 30, 1784 Accounting practices John Pierce Philip Audebert John Pierce sends to Philip Audibert a letter discussing accounting practices.
September 23, 1796 Recent Injuries from the Creek Indians Jared Irwin James McHenry Governor Irwin reports on the disquietude felt by his citizens in consequence of the recent injuries from the Creek Indians. Neither the punishment of those responsible for the murder of Indians nor the invitation to attend a treaty has allayed their thirst for predatory operations.
1794 Slaves stolen by Creek Indians James Seagrove Henry Knox Memorandum from the Agent of Indian Affairs. Seagrove believes that 60 to 70 black slaves have been stolen from Georgia by Creek Indians.
August 29, 1796 Dragoons, Troop Movements, Creek Hostility Anthony Wayne James McHenry In a largely illegible letter, Wayne seems to be reporting on the state of the military deployment in the southwest that is a response to the hostile actions of the Creek Indians. Also addresses the time and difficulty of transporting large numbers of troops across the frontier.