Viewing 1–25 of 966 documents: "Upper Creeks"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
March 23, 1793 Circular letter to the chiefs of the Upper and Lower Creeks regarding murder of white settlers at Traders Hill James Seagrove [not available] In this circular, sent to twenty of the principal chiefs of the upper and lower Creeks, Seagrove refers to a murder of white settlers at Traders Hill store St Marys. He expresses disappointment that the incident may upset the peace. Emphasizes that President of United States and Seagrove consider Creeks a friend of United States. Asks that chiefs use their leadership and influence to preserve...
January 6, 1797 Report on Indian Affairs in the Southwest Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Hawkins reports on his tour through the Southwest frontier, including trading affairs and his observations on the Upper Creeks and Cherokees and the intentions of their Chiefs
June 29, 1787 To the Head-Men and Warriors of the Lower Creeks. [not available] Headmen and Warriors of Lower Creeks Author, possibly indian agent, expresses desire for peace and regrets loss of life caused by white warriors. Warns against any hostilities against whites. Will not hold lower Creeks accountable of transgressions of Upper Creeks. Mentions Mr Barnard and Mr Galphin and Treaty at Shoulderbone and Alexander McGillivray.
October 27, 1792 Indian Hostilities Henry Knox Governor Edward Telfair Intelligence from Gov. Blount states that five hundred warriors from Chickamaga towns and some banditti Upper Creeks plan hostilities against the U.S. and will strike the Cumberland settlements. Authorized Governor to make defensive preparations.
June 14, 1793 Giving up the Murderers and Robbers at Traders Hill St. Marys [not available] James Seagrove On behalf of upper Creeks, letter from Tuckabachee. Authors acknowledge receipt of talks from Mr. McDonald. Refer to Spaniard talks to be held on Tuckabachees on 12 June. The headmen of both upper and lower Creeks have agreed to kill the perpetrators of robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys, and will notify Seagrove via Weatherford when completed. It will take time because of Indian...
August 16, 1793 Deposition from William Jones to Jared Irwin on prospects for peace following death of David Cornell William Jones [not available] In deposition given at Washington County Georgia, Jones states that having resided among the upper Creeks, has found them inclined toward peace until the death of David Cornell, whose circumstances have exasperated his family and who are determined to have satisfaction. Sworn before Jared Irwin and taken from Executive files of W. Urquhart S.E.D.
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to the Mad Dog of Tucabachee, Upper Creeks on death of David Cornell and expected meeting 10 September 1793 James Seagrove Mad Dog Seagrove laments the death of mutual friend David Cornell. Promises full satisfaction for his death and pleads for restraint among the Creeks. Informs Mad Dog of expected meeting and asks that he take measures both to attend himself, and to provide for Seagrove's security. Says he has informed President of United States General Washington that Mad Dog is reliable friend. Promises to settle all...
April 15, 1793 Letter from Alexander Cornell on behalf of self and upper Creeks on the robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys Alexander Cornell James Seagrove Cornell reports that war is imminent. Old Tallissic [sp] King, and his people are at war, joined by the Colummys. Indians are like mad people; running crazy. Cornell says he has done in the upper towns what Seagrove instructed and there is nothing more to do. Upper towns want peace, except for two towns. This King, who once gave land away; now wants to do mischief against whites. Whatever...
October 3, 1789 Questions regarding legitimacy of previous treaties between Creeks and Georgia Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton Request for information regarding treaties at Augusta, 1783, Galphinton, 1785, and Shoulderbone, 1786. Principal points are whether all lands belonging to the upper and lower Creeks are common property of whole nation, or whether the lands were ceded to Georgia by the three treaties. Were the proprietors of the lands stated to have been ceded to Georgia present or fully represented by the...
July 27, 1787 Talk of the Fat King to His Honor Governor Mathews of Georgia and his Council [not available] George Mathews Have seen the talk sent by commissary Mr. Barnard. It is the whites who have forgot the talks at Shoulderbone, not the Creeks. Laments the hasty revenges taking place. Cannot be accountable for measures of Upper Towns; they can answer for themselves. Refer to promise made to southern Indian superintendent Mr. White. Make demands for satisfaction, life for life; and equal number for twelve people...
June 20, 1793 Events in Aftermath of Robbery and Murder at Traders Hill St. Marys Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove Bernard, in reporting to Seagrove from Flint River Georgia, notes that the upper Creeks held a meeting at the Tuchabachees of the upper and lower Creeks. Those who attended agreed to would take steps to ensure peace with United States; would take measures to satisfy Seagrove's demands to for satisfaction for murders at Traders Hill St Marys. Bernard notes that the old villain Daniel Dourouzeaux,...
1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard [Bernard] to Henry Gaither Major Commandant on the state of affairs on the frontier, the prospects for peace, and whether military operations will make distinctions between Creek friend and foe Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither Undated letter, presumably written spring or summer 1793. Barnard discusses the danger of traveling, presumably in the aftermath of the robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys. Matters may have to be settled by an army coming against the offenders. Does not see war as general yet. Hopes that distinctions can be made by army between hostile and peaceful towns. Cussetahs want peace. Mad Dog of...
July 21, 1793 A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckaubatchees, given out in the Cussetah Square, at a meeting of a number of Lower Creeks, this 21st July, 1793-to be forwarded to his Excellency General Washington, President of the United States. [not available] [not available] Translated by Timothy Bernard at Cussetahs. A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckabatchee, to be forwarded to His Excellency General Washington, President of United States. Heads of Creek Nation report that Chickasaw Nation holding talks with Governor Blount, Southwest Territorial Governor, and report on the dispatch of several thousand men to...
October 17, 1793 Letter from Timothy Barnard [Bernard] to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, on the prospects for peace, Warrior King's meeting with lower Creeks, White Lieutenant and upper Creek Chiefs Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove From Flint River, prospects for peace are good it seems. The Warrior King trying to reconcile matters. Met with leadership of Lower Creeks at Cussetah, and with White Lieutenant and upper Creek Chiefs at Tuckabatchee. Cowetas promise to lay quiet; talk strongly of killing horse thieves. Seek to get women prisoners back. Ask Seagrove to mediate and bring prisoners with him when he comes to visit....
October 7, 1792 Request to Inform Creeks of Meeting with President James Seagrove Chief White Lieutenant Brought up confusion of Creeks caused by "wicked white men" and Seagrove expressed pleasure that the Creeks held fast to U.S. alliance. Informed White Lieutenant that Seagrove will meet all chiefs of the upper towns at the head of the St. Mary's River. Requests White Lieutenant make offer of friendship known to all chiefs.
September 4, 1798 Report on Creeks Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Lists a number of enclosures and addresses issue of stipends for Creek Indians. Is adamant about not giving presents, but feels they are entitled to yearly stipends.
April 19, 1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent reporting on events in aftermath of robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove Addressed from Flint River Georgia, Bernard reports that Seagrove's demands for the murderers at Traders Hill have been communicated to the Indians. Kinnard has told Bernard to leave this business to him. Bernard in more danger because he is white. Reports that Galphin is trying to set the Chehaws on him. He blames all the mischief of late on Galphin and his ilk. Upper Creeks willing to comply...
July 21, 1793 A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckabatchees to be forwarded to His Excellency General George Washington, President of United States Timothy Barnard [Bernard] [not available] Translated by Timothy Bernard at Cussetahs. A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckabatchee, to be forwarded to His Excellency General Washington, President of United States. Heads of Creek Nation report that Chickasaw Nation holding talks with Governor Blount, Southwest Territorial Governor, and report on the dispatch of several thousand men to...
June 20, 1793 Report on Events in Aftermath of Robbery & Murder at Traders Hill St. Marys Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove From Flint River Georgia, Bernard report to Seagrove that he has been to Cussetah Towns with David Cornell, head warrior of Tuchabachees. Conclusion was to give satisfaction for robbery and murders at Traders Hill. Men were sent by Cussetahs to kill the perpetrators. Daniel Dourouzeaux, villain who turned Spaniard, at behest of Panton, interfered with the business. Nevertheless, both upper and...
April 8, 1793 From Tuchabachee: Letter from Mad Dog, The White Lieutenant, David Cornell, Alexander Cornell, Mr Weathorford, and thirteen headmen of Upper Creeks [not available] James Seagrove The authors pledge agreement with James Seagrove's talk. Authors note that they did not listen to northern Indians; do not want to shed any white people's blood. Once went to war against Cumberland people, but since Seagrove's talk don't intend to go to war. Mad Dog's brother and nephew went into Chickasaw leader's house and killed them both. Tried to keep peace with all colors, but they...
May 8, 1799 Benjamin Hawkins Benjamin Hawkins [not available] Possible duplicate of Report of the Chiefs of the Upper and Lower Creeks (same date)
March 12, 1790 Instructions Regarding Willet's Mission to the Creek Nation Henry Knox Marinus Willett Knox informs Colonel Marinus Willet of his instructions for meeting with the Creek Nation of Indians and their leader, Alexander McGillivray. His primary mission is to prevent a war and to encourage McGillivray and other Creek chiefs to travel to New York for treaty talks.
May 18, 1799 Report of the Chiefs of the Upper and Lower Creeks Benjamin Hawkins [not available] The Indians report to Hawkins that they are going to all of the nations to tell them to assist the men running the boundary line between the United States and Spain. Hawkins approved and offered advice on what to say.
June 23, 1793 Commitment to Peace with the United States Chief White Lieutenant James Seagrove Dispatch from White Lieutenant or Tuskena Atca, for himself and the Upper Creek Towns, to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, interpreted and delivered by Stephen Sullivan. White Lieutenant pledges his commitment to peace with United States and will comply with demands to turn over the perpetrators of robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys. Asks for patience and understanding. Reminds...
July 27, 1792 Cost of War and Peace with Creeks James Seagrove Henry Knox Supply of rations for Indians insufficient to meet needs, Seagrove placated Creeks desire for more food. Mentioned the cost of war with the Creeks to the state of Georgia, and that conceding to the Indians wants was the only manner of securing peace. McGillivray's obstruction of peace noted, now it is believed he is advising the Spanish.