Viewing 1–25 of 1,470 documents: "Treaty of Muskingum"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 27, 1792 Conditions of U.S. Treaty with Six Nations Henry Knox Joseph Brandt Formal invitation to Brandt to sit on General Council as Chief of Six Nations. Document explains the U.S. stance on hostile Indians, hopes Brandt will convey sentiments to Indians.
July 15, 1788 Attack on Party at Falls of Muskingum Arthur St. Clair General Butler Regarding attack on party at falls of Muskingum, two killed, two wounded. One Indian killed. States that the affair has been exaggerated in common report and fears effect on the settlements. Prospects for peace and war hang on the balance.
March 10, 1792 Letter Signed, Henry Knox to James Wilkinson Henry Knox James Wilkinson Letter, discusses frontier protection; discusses Indians and Indian warfare; mentions Treaty of Muskingum of 1789.
November 8, 1791 Report Concerning Indian Boundary Lines Thomas Jefferson [not available] Jefferson delineates the boundaries of the United States and Indian Nations.
April 26, 1788 Outlines Travel Plans; Preparations for Indian Treaty Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Outlines travel plans from Muskingum, to Venango, to Captain Heart's post, where he assures that he will do everything in his power to assist this company. Believes this group of people to be quite industrious and capable. Nicholson, the interpreter and messenger, believes the Indians will be late in assembling for the treaty and will insist on the Ohio River as boundary. Encloses monthly return.
October 5, 1792 [Speech of John Heckewelder to the Delware chiefs and captains, Walendauwechen, Pachgantschihillas, Muchingwe, Pushees, and Captain Pipe.] John Heckenwelder [not available] Assurances of truth and peace. Offer to meet at the mouth of the Muskingum to talk out peace.
June 27, 1792 Knox's Invitation to a Chief of the Six Nations to the General Government Henry Knox [not available] The recipient, a chief of the Six Nations, is invited to the seat of the US Government to hear the US policy towards the hostile and non-hostile Indian tribes. The US hopes to disabuse the hostile tribes, especially the Miami, Wabash, and Shawnee, of the idea that the US is trying to steal land. They hope that the chiefs will help to communicate the following points to the hostile tribes: the US...
March 25, 1795 Overtures of Peace Timothy Pickering Arthur St. Clair Pickering believed that the militia under Col. Sproat currently employed defending the Muskingum can be "dispensed with." Mentioned overtures of peace made by 6 Indian tribes to Gen. Wayne. It was stipulated in writing that both sides would suspend hostilities. Also addressed peace with Great Britain.
March 25, 1795 Militia for Protection of Muskingum and Gallipolis Timothy Pickering Rufus Putnam Enclosed copy of letter to Gov. St. Clair, if he is absent Pickering requested Putnam's advice to be given to Sproat relative to the number of militia necessary to guard settlements around the Muskingum river and Gallipolis.
January 21, 1794 Treaty Between United States and Delaware, Shawnee, and Miami Nations Anthony Wayne [not available] Wayne addressed all chiefs of the three nations and accepted their hands in friendship and peace. Warrior Chiefs accept peace treaty.
August 3, 1795 Peace Treaty Anthony Wayne [not available] Official sealed document securing peace between U.S. and Western Indian Nations. Set boundary line between nations as Cayahoga River.
November 5, 1794 Peace with hostile Indians Anthony Wayne Unknown Recipient General Anthony Wayne regarding the establishment of a "permanent and lasting peace" between the United States and "hostile tribes of Indians." Talks of a treaty with the Wyandots. Also talks of "some of the bad white people" who have instigated conflict.
September 24, 1792 Growing Indian Hostilities General Israel Chapin Henry Knox Peace could not be reached with hostile Indians. Canada Indians perplexed at at inability to reach peace. Council fire between Canada Indians, Delaware, and Shawnee moved to the mouth of the Muskingum.
July 22, 1788 Party of Chippewas in close confinement Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Following the violence at the falls of Muskingum, party of Chippewas returned and were taken into custody under suspicion of ill intentions. Had a soldier's cartridge box in their possession.
July 18, 1788 Express from Colonel Joseph Brant, head of Five Nations General Butler Arthur St. Clair Brant will arrive at Pittsburg in a few days with his people, on the way to Muskingum. Wishes not to send Nicholson, as he will prove useful at present location.
December 22, 1795 Treaty of Greenville George Washington Unknown Recipient Peace treaty between United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Chipewas, Potowatamies, Eel-River, Weeas Kickapoos, Piankashaws, Kaskaskias, and Miamis. Prisoner release negotiated and borders decided upon.
November 18, 1794 Speech of Northwestern Indians Northwestern Indian Chiefs United States Letter from Northwestern Indian chiefs to Major General Anthony Wayne and the United States, discussing potential peace.
July 3, 1786 Reports Activities of Moravian Indians Josiah Harmar Henry Knox John Bull (Indian name Shebo) reports that a group of 100 Moravian Indians have crossed the lake with the intent to settle near their old towns at the location of a previous massacre on the Muskingum. Because it is too late in the season for planting, they will remain at Cuyahoga until next season. Reports that group of whites and Indians set sail for Canada to purchase land north of Quebec, but...
April 8, 1795 Articles of Treaty Negotiations Timothy Pickering Anthony Wayne Timothy Pickering - interim Secretary of War - provides General Wayne with instructions relative to the approaching treaty with the Indians.
September 26, 1794 Letter from the chiefs and warriors of Sandusky Tarke United States Letter from the chiefs and warriors of Sandusky, addressed to the "Brothers of the thirteen United States of America." They had formed a bond of friendship with the United States in council at Muskingum
April 26, 1788 Preparation for Indian Treaty; Reports Indian Trading Efforts Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Expresses frustration that Tardiveau has not delivered the letter. Describes his travels and explains Nicholson's intelligence about how the Indians will approach the treaty with the intent to establish the border on the Ohio River. Reports Ensign Spear's duty to collect the commissioner's goods from the Rapids of the Ohio. Plans for arrival of Governor of the Western Territory and the...
September 14, 1788 Preparations for Indian Treaty; Reports Indian Attack Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Announces Zeigler's arrival, escorted by Cornplanter and Halftown, an Oneida chief, and several of the Six Nations, to arrange the treaty. Describes attack on Lieut. Peters and Major Hamtramck's men with their provisions, with 10 killed and 8 wounded.
June 21, 1792 Updates on Preparations for War, Information on Superiors James Wilkinson Henry Knox No word from enemy on possible peace, preparations at fort made for war.
November 4, 1794 Peace with the Wyandots Anthony Wayne Wyandot Chief Major General Anthony Wayne delivers speech to the Wyandots, who have pleaded for peace. Wayne states, "I hope and trust that your eyes are now opened." Urges that a "permanent and lasting peace" may be established upon establishing a just boundary.
January 19, 1791 Speech of the President to the Seneca Chiefs George Washington Seneca Chiefs Washington refuses to restore any of the lands ceded by the Indians in the treaties of Fort Stanwix and Fort Harmar but assures them that he is still their friend and protector and will help them achieve prosperity by teaching them to raise domestic animals, the use of the plow, and how to raise corn.