Viewing 401–420 of 420 documents: "Southern"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
February 13, 1792 Disposition of the Indians in This Quarter Reverend Samuel Kirkland Henry Knox Reverend Kirkland reports on sundry councils with representatives of the western tribes and assesses the prospects for peace or war on the frontier.
February 22, 1791 Decisive Action Against the Indians on the Frontier Henry Knox George Washington Henry Knox's report to the President discusses the coming year's goals of peace in the frontiers and explains in detail how best to meet those goals, using both peaceful and military measures. He provides an in-depth analysis of the force required and the cost involved in taking decisive action against the Indians along the frontier, and the potential political and military implications of the...
May 2, 1791 A Report on Travels Through the Creek Country, 1791 Caleb Swan [not available] Document, report describes the Creek country, people, culture, and government. Refers to horse theft and trials.
April 25, 1783 Payment of Soldiers General William Irvine [not available] Extract of orders, noting that privates in the infantry of the Continental service receive on account of their pay one half dollar specie per week and the non-commissioned officers and privates of these corps in the same proportion. Mr. Rose will pay the troops of the garrison until a properly authorized person is appointed. Irvine requests that a commissioned officer from each company attend the...
March 13, 1791 State of the Creek Nation James Casey Henry Knox Comprehensive treatment of every aspect of the culture and lives of the Creek Nation of Indians in 1790-1791. Includes transcript of a journal. 132 page document.
September 11, 1789 Report from Federal Treaty Commissioners to Governor of Georgia Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton Federal Commissioners for negotiating treaty with Indians south of Ohio River report to governor of Georgia. They note that the negotiations are to be held at Rock Landing, and discuss the procurement of provisions there. They inquire as to whether supplies can be procured in Georgia.
September 13, 1789 Message to the Cherokee from the Commissioners Plenipotentiary for Restoring and Establishing Peace and Amity Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] A message to the Cherokee nation of Indians, from the commissioners plenipotentiary for restoring and establishing peace and amity between the United States of America and all the Indian nations situated within the limits of the said States, southward of the river Ohio. From Savannah, the commissioners transmitted friendly talks to the Cherokees, Chickasaws, and Choctaws. The talks mention...
September 13, 1789 Message for the Citizens Bordering on Towns and Settlements of Cherokee Nation Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Henry Knox Commissioners forward copy of message intended for the citizens bordering on towns and settlements of Cherokee nation. Note that any infraction of the tranquility will incur the displeasure of the supreme authority of the United States. Attested by David S. Franks Secretary. Copy given to Mr. Ballew.
September 16, 1789 Preparations for Treaty and Intent of Indians Not to Remain Much Longer Andrew Pickens Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Every arrangement has been made and Indians are encamped at the distance directed by Secretary of War. Great exertions have been made to keep Indians together, and in good humor. They will not remain much longer. Ask that the commissioners before the next Friday. Mention that Alexander McGillivray wishes to remain longer.
September 18, 1789 Reply from Governor George Walton to Federal Commissioners George Walton [not available] Reply to a note from the Commissioners sending letters for the Governor. The Commissioners were unable to present the letters to the Walton in person because he is ill. Walton thanks them for the note. He has been unable to act on their letter of the 11th regarding provisions. He would be happy to meet with the Commissioners in the morning.
September 18, 1789 Letter to Alexander McGillivray Expressing Astonishment that Indians May Leave Before Treaty Talks Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray In a copy of letter to Alexander McGillivray sent to Pickens and Osborne, commissioners express astonishment that the Indians might disperse shortly and tell McGillivray that they will be at the Rock Landing in two days, and assure McGillivray that if a lasting peace and friendship is not established, it will not be their fault.
September 25, 1789 Request for Terms to be Agreed Upon Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray Commissioners received note informing that chiefs were in council until late evening; appeared they were not entirely satisfied with some parts of talk. Objected to boundary line. Ask for the terms upon which the Chiefs will agree to. Hope that Chiefs will not leave without affording chance to conclude a treaty; do not expect another commission. Not authorized to make any presents unless a treaty...
September 26, 1789 Dissatisfaction with Alexander McGillivray's Behavior Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray The commissioners are unhappy that McGillivray has fallen back under false pretexts. They recount that they asked for treaty objections in writing and were promised by McGillivray that he would not separate until providing final terms. They admonish that if McGillivray departs without full discussion of business, then it cannot be considered in any other point of light, than a refusal to...
September 27, 1789 Explanation for Retreat from Former Camp and Prospects for Further Talks Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department McGillivray says he moved camp because he needed food for his horses. Relates that he spoke at length with Colonel Humphreys regarding the contest between Creeks and state of Georgia. Says that when he learned that discussions would not include encroachments or restitution of hunting grounds, or Oconee lands, then he resolved to return to the nation to refer the matter until spring. Nothing...
September 28, 1789 Notification that Creek Parties have Separated Without Forming a Treaty Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Henry Knox US Commissioners inform Knox that the parties have separated without forming a treaty. The terms were not agreeable to Alexander McGillivray, but neither would he come forward with written objections or propose any conditions of his own. His verbal communications were inadmissible, upon the spirit or words of our instructions.
September 28, 1789 Regarding the Failed Treaty Talks with Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray The commissioners state that they are sorry that McGillivray did not provide objections, nor propose terms acceptable to Creek nation. Colonel Humphreys said that he did not offer any articles as an ultimatum. State that McGillivray must have understood that commissioners were desirous of receiving terms that would form basis for treaty. Commissioners will report the facts to President...
October 2, 1789 Notification that commissioners have not concluded a treaty of peace between United States and Creek nation Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton US Commissioners inform Governor of Georgia that they have not concluded treaty between United States and Creek nation. However, positive and repeated assurances were given by Alexander McGillivray and all the Creek chiefs that peace would not be violated.
October 3, 1789 Questions regarding legitimacy of previous treaties between Creeks and Georgia Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton Request for information regarding treaties at Augusta, 1783, Galphinton, 1785, and Shoulderbone, 1786. Principal points are whether all lands belonging to the upper and lower Creeks are common property of whole nation, or whether the lands were ceded to Georgia by the three treaties. Were the proprietors of the lands stated to have been ceded to Georgia present or fully represented by the...
1789 Draft of a treaty entitled: Articles of peace and amity agreed upon between the President of the United States of America and Creeks Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] Draft of a treaty entitled: Articles of peace and amity agreed upon between the President of the United States of America, in behalf of the said States, by the underwritten commissioners plenipotentiary, on the one part, and the undersigned kings, head-men, and warriors, of all the Creeks, in behalf of themselves and the Creek nation, on the other.
June 1, 1789 A Talk from the Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors of the Lower Creek Nation. Headmen and Warriors of Lower Creeks [not available] Begins with expressions of friendship; and it was never intended to hurt white people. Note that "at our first meeting at the sea side, for the benefit of trade, we gave our land as far as the water ebbed and flowed, and by frequent request, granted as far as possible, reserving our hunting grounds: for what will be the use of goods brought amongst us, if our young men have not hunting ground to...