Viewing 1–25 of 80 documents: "Senecas"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
April 28, 1792 Knox directs interpreters tasked to support the relocation of the Senecas Henry Knox Mr. Jones Knox issues direction to Messers Jones and Smith. Jones and Smith are interpreters assigned to accompany the relocation of the Senecas to Genesee.
July 3, 1797 Secretary at War directs the conduct of Indian affairs with Chapin James McHenry Israel Chapin Jr McHenry informs Chapin to relay the willingness of the U.S. to receive offers from the Senecas to sell land.
December 13, 1788 Arrival of Five Nations, Senecas, Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatamies, Sacs Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox Previous night, the Five Nations, Senecas, Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatamies, Sacs arrived. Brant with the Mohawks turned back upon receiving St. Clair's message. Brant did everything to prevent the rest from coming forward, without effect.
1794 Speech to the Senecas Henry Knox Cornplanter, Chief of the Senecas Letter, advises Cornplanter of the President's continued confidence and friendship.
February 10, 1792 Resolving Issues with the Senecas Henry Knox Seneca Chiefs Knox tells New-Arrow, Cornplanter, Big-Log, and other Seneca chiefs that he would like to meet with them in Philadelphia in order to resolve any issues that might stand in the way of friendship between the Senecas and the United States.
November 25, 1790 James Dean is deposed regarding the dispute between Phelps and Red Jacket James Dean [not available] James Dean provides a deposition pertaining to the disputed terms of the treaty between Oliver Phelps and the Senecas [Red Jacket]. Dean witnessed the treaty as the interpreter. Dean states that Phelps agreed to pay the Senecas 5,000 dollars the first year and 500 dollars every year thereafter for land.
1794 Autograph Document [not available] [not available] Document, speech re Government policy toward Indians--President's promise to Senecas of a written General Guarantee of all lands they are entitled to by reservation or otherwise.
December 8, 1792 Captain Prior and Wabash Indians; Expected Arrival of Cornplanter and Senecas Isaac Craig Henry Knox Captain Prior and party of Wabash Indians with interpreters arrived at the Post and will set off in a few days for Philadelphia. Cornplanter said to be on his way with party of Senecas.
December 12, 1792 Knox directs Chapin regarding Indian affairs Henry Knox General Israel Chapin Letter, Knox directs that Chapin ensure messages be delivered to hostile Indians; Knox directs Red Jacket be sent to War Office; alludes to Indian delegation.
April 4, 1792 Speech to the Indians Henry Knox [not available] Captain Alexander Trueman delivers this speech, written by the Secretary at War, to the Chiefs and Warriors of the Western Indians.
August 13, 1793 Ownership of Land West of the Ohio River Chiefs and Warriors Council of Indian Nations at Rapids of Miami River Commissioners Official document from Confederacy of Indian Nations. Land ceded by a few chiefs of the Confederacy did not validate the U.S. claims to the land west of the Ohio River. Indians will not sell their lands, instead they tell the U.S. to give the money to the poor settlers so they can move off the land.
September 14, 1788 Arrival of Senecas; preemptive attack; on the efficiency of a general Indian confederacy Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox General Butler arrived with 51 Senecas, including Cornplanter and Halftown. Six Nations desires peace. Discusses application made, in conjunction with Guysatha, for release of Chipewa prisoners. Suggests that war with Western tribes is inevitable. Discusses possibility of decisive military stroke, simultaneously and at multiple locations. Suggests that in the wake of such attacks, Indians would...
March 1, 1792 Ogden informs Knox of Indian motives Samuel Ogden Henry Knox Letter, discusses motives of the Indian delegation.
[not available] Speech to the Senecas at Buffalo Creek Israel Chapin Jr Seneca Chiefs Chapin has been in Philadelphia attending the Seneca's business. Phelps will make his payment within a month and a half. Phelps and others plan to settle near Presque Isle, but Chapin told them they must meet with the Indians first. There are goods for the Indians ready to be taken. The Quakers in Philadelphia want to come to the Seneca and teach the children to read and write, teach agriculture,...
May 11, 1791 Treating with the Six Nations Henry Knox George Clinton Knox discusses treating with the Six Nations and State government and laws respecting Indian affairs. He alludes to the planned embassy to the Western Indians.
June 7, 1793 Letter from Federal Commissioners Sandusky Conference to Governor Simcoe Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky [not available] Simcoe conveys that British officers will attend Sandusky Conference. Chief of Senekas [Senecas] believes that open communication with Governor Simcoe on treaty would have salutary effect; Governor will give his opinion about it. Presence of officers would add to security. [Same day, separate note from Governor Simcoe]. Governor is impressed by the importance of the negotiations and will help...
March 9, 1793 Chief Cornplanter's visit to Philadelphia Henry Knox Isaac Craig Secretary Knox is glad to learn that Doctor Carmichael arrived safe with money. Also sorry that Cornplanter will not visit Philadelphia as if disaffected with United States. Says this idea is unfortunate. Senecas residing at Buffalo Creek were offended by his former visit as unauthorized by council, and prohibited his visit.
August 11, 1793 Journal entry on report from Senekas [Senecas] regarding Council at rapids of Miami and prospects for peace Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Henry Knox King's Vessel named Chippewa arrived from Detroit, bound for Fort Erie with Senekas aboard. The Senekas are known to General Chapin and Jones, interpreter. Report from one says 4 nations want war. Six Nations chiefs planned to addressed them more than is customary. If no success, would go home. Farmer's Brother suggesting no peace will be made. Both six nations and seven nations of Canada want...
February 25, 1792 Invitation by President to Visit Philadelphia Henry Knox Joseph Brandt Reiteration of invitation to visit Philadelphia to discuss welfare of Indians.
January 26, 1792 Discussion of various matters Isaac Craig Henry Knox Major Craig informs Secretary Knox that the militia will not reinforce Fort Franklin because the snow is too deep. Also mentions that the Senaca Indians are willing to take up arms with the United States if called upon. Lieutenant Jeffers has been advised to send a weekly runner between Fort Pitt and Fort Franklin.
May 18, 1791 Update on Advice to be Delivered to the Chiefs of the Six Nations A. Gordon Thomas Procter Chiefs never arrived for advice to be administered by Gordon. Gordon not authorized to give permission for accompaniment of Indians for Proctor's travels to Sandusky.
February 22, 1801 Certification of payment William Simmons Samuel Dexter Certification of payment; Francis Mentges for sundry articles of clothing, boarding, lodging of four Senecas and one Tuscarora Indian.
October 8, 1793 Speech to Six Nations on Peace Agreement Chiefs & Warriors of the Six Nations Six Nations of Indians Account of meeting between Six Nations, John Butler, and Israel Chapin regarding history of war, British aggression, peace among Indian nations and U.S., and mandate to avoid whites and fellow Indians who might try and inspire insurrection and war.
March 3, 1794 Mysterious Lack of Indian Activity Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Major General Anthony Wayne comments that no Indians have been encountered since mid January, neither for peace purposes or further attacks. Wayne hopes the Indians are inclined to peace, but vows to make good on plans to build a new post further inside their territory. Details scouting parties sent out, and mentions necessity of quick action -- as many enlistments expire in May. Brief mention...
September 2, 1788 Report on the state of Indian affairs Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox St. Clair expresses anxiousness over the state of Indian affairs. Delawares appear to be friendly. Expects information on the Six Nations soon. Discusses preparations by Pennsylvania and Virginia to prepare militias. General Butler and Senecas not yet arrived.