Viewing 1–25 of 347 documents: "Onittanon towns"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
August 13, 1792 Horse Stealing by Indians of Lower Towns Leonard Shaw William Blount Describes horse stealing by Indians near Estanaula and the talks surrounding stopping the acts. Believed it too dangerous for a white man to travel between towns for fear of being hijacked. Mentioned Spanish intentions of supplying ammunition to the lower towns.
September 7, 1792 Indians Declare War James Carey William Blount Too deadly to travel with news from Little Turkey, therefore Carey entrusted letter to Indian who will carry to Hanging Maw's. Notification that the five lower towns have declared war on U.S., advised Blount to be on guard against attacks.
April 15, 1793 Letter from Alexander Cornell on behalf of self and upper Creeks on the robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys Alexander Cornell James Seagrove Cornell reports that war is imminent. Old Tallissic [sp] King, and his people are at war, joined by the Colummys. Indians are like mad people; running crazy. Cornell says he has done in the upper towns what Seagrove instructed and there is nothing more to do. Upper towns want peace, except for two towns. This King, who once gave land away; now wants to do mischief against whites. Whatever...
October 9, 1792 Cherokee Declaration of War Henry Knox William Blount Received letter from Blount which contained proclamation of war on U.S. by the five lower Cherokee towns which is perplexing along with failed negotiations, violence, and leadership of the nations by J. Watts. Advised calling up militia and confining operations to defensive measures until Congress convenes. Requested Blount send an expedition to upper Creek towns to request that their banditti...
June 17, 1793 Intelligence from the Lower Towns Secretary Smith Major King Smith has written letters to John Watts, Double-head, the Hanging Maw, and Edward Adair and asks Major King to obtain whatever intelligence he can from the Lower towns respecting what they intend to do.
June 9, 1793 Reporting on the Georgia Militia's March against Hostile Indian Towns Henry Gaither Henry Knox In this letter from Ft Fidius, Gaither reports that Georgia Militia, under leadership of Major General Twiggs and Brigadiers Irwin Clark and Blackburn with about 600 officers and men, about half mounted, marched against hostile towns, crossed the Oconee. Gaither believes current effort is to avoid the friendly towns. Gaither received answer to Seagrove's demands and sent Ensign Sedgewick with...
June 5, 1788 Indians Seeking Peace Prince of Notoly Andrew Pickens Chota Indians left their towns and land so the Creeks and White People can fight among themselves.
February 22, 1791 Decisive Action Against the Indians on the Frontier Henry Knox George Washington Henry Knox's report to the President discusses the coming year's goals of peace in the frontiers and explains in detail how best to meet those goals, using both peaceful and military measures. He provides an in-depth analysis of the force required and the cost involved in taking decisive action against the Indians along the frontier, and the potential political and military implications of the...
October 24, 1794 Destruction of Cherokee towns William Blount Henry Knox Letter from the Governor of Southwest Territory to the Secretary of War, regarding the destruction of two hostile lower Cherokee towns (Running Water and Nickajack).
September 13, 1792 Indians Turning Away from Spanish James Seagrove Henry Knox Political alliances with Eufath discussed. Seagrove believes Indians have turned away from Spanish and will ally with United States. Noted the lower towns, which had previously supported Bowles, now support U.S. with assistance of Kinnard.
September 2, 1792 Indian Relations and Settler Unrest John Thompson William Blount Attempts to persuade Blount that the Spaniards are behind Creek hostilities and murder against white settlers, and that the peaceful towns will "do their part" in keeping the peace. Thompson asked on behalf of peaceful Indians if it is safe to remain in their towns for fear of attacks from white settlers. Requests letter be burned after it is received.
October 30, 1794 Destruction of Lower Cherokee Towns Henry Knox Bartholomew Dandridge Secretary Knox requests that Mr. Dandridge submit to President Washington the enclosed letter from Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory, regarding the destruction of two lower Cherokee towns, Running Water and Nickajack.
May 13, 1793 James Seagrove to the Kings, Chiefs, and Headmen of the Cussetah Town, and all others of the Lower Towns of Creek Nation James Seagrove [not available] Addresses the Cussetah as good friends. Some towns are like them; others are guilty of bad things. Expects to see murderers [from Traders Hill incident] turned over to him; or at least wants to hear they are dead. This is the only way to preserve peace. Does not blame Cussetahs, but as great mother town, should be more insistent to the others. Sent a strong talk via George Galphin. If there is...
October 2, 1793 Letter from Georgia Governor Telfair to Secretary of War Henry Knox on enclosed documents respecting inimical Creek Towns Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor of Georgia Telfair indicates to Secretary of War Knox that enclosed documents respecting the inimical Creek Towns will give information as to why it is useless to stop citizens of Georgia from going in quest of their property. Prisoners directed to Augusta, await exchange for white captives
September 13, 1789 Message for the Citizens Bordering on Towns and Settlements of Cherokee Nation Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Henry Knox Commissioners forward copy of message intended for the citizens bordering on towns and settlements of Cherokee nation. Note that any infraction of the tranquility will incur the displeasure of the supreme authority of the United States. Attested by David S. Franks Secretary. Copy given to Mr. Ballew.
November 1, 1794 Peace with Lower Cherokee William Blount Benjamin Logan After having corresponded with Double-head, Chief of the Cherokees, Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory orders that General Benjamin Logan immediately desist from attempts to invade Lower Cherokee towns, who are in a state of peace with the United States. Rogue elements of the military had previously destroyed the friendly Cherokee towns of Nickajack and Running Water.
June 5, 1792 The State of Indian Talks; Threat of Attack Rufus Putnam Henry Knox Putnam informs Knox of the state of the negotiations between the US and some of the northern tribes and warns that any attack by the US on Indian towns would severely hinder the talks and endanger all US citizens in the vicinity of the attack.
August 5, 1788 Destruction of Cherokee towns by Servier, from State of Franklin [North Carolina] Richard Winn Henry Knox A party from North Carolina, called Franklin State, with Sevier at the head, came over and destroyed several of their towns, killing nearly 30 Indians. Overhills seem determined for war. Winn wishes to bring the Cherokee situation before Congress.
July 11, 1792 No Expeditions to Indian Towns Henry Knox Henry Lee No expeditions to Indian towns unless hostilities are expressed. Peace accord directed by Governor Blount with the Cherokees is believed to be successful.
July 7, 1795 Enclosed Speech to Chickasaws and Chocktaws Timothy Pickering George Washington Cover letter for the draft speech to the Chickasaws and Chocktaws and other representatives that form the Five Upper Towns.
October 28, 1797 Happy Accommodation of All Past Differences Among the Four Nations Chief Cussetah King [not available] Speech of the Cussetahs and lower towns to the Chickasaws in reply to an address.
February 1, 1793 Trials of Offenders Against Treaties William Blount Henry Knox Blount agonizes over the two narrowly averted invasions of Cherokee towns and proposes that a tribunal be created with jurisdiction over trials of offenders agains treaties.
1793 The speech of Nioctsaw Mico or Sick King a Simanolla. Chief Sick King James Seagrove Undated letter, presumably written during spring or summer of 1793, translated by Langley Bryant with sworn testimony by Joseph Ellicot, surveyor, that the document is an exact copy. Addressing James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, the Sick King of the Simanolla gives assurances that his people will not join the mad people and go to war against the whites. His people are not like those in the mad...
November 4, 1790 Return of the Killed and Wounded upon the Expedition against the Miami Towns Josiah Harmar [not available] Return of the killed and wounded upon the expedition against the Miami towns, under the command of Brigadier General Harmar. Federal troops killed: 75; militia; 108. Total wounded: 31. Killed included Major Wyllys, Lieutenant Frothingham, Major Fontaine, Captain Thorp, Captain, Scott, Captain McMurtry, Lieutenant Clark, Lieutenant Worley, and Ensign Arnold.
February 3, 1791 Request to examine account of Lt John Belli of Kentucky Militia John Stagg Joseph Howell Stagg conveys Secretary of War request to examine account of Lieutenant John Belli paymaster of Kentucky Militia. He served in late expedition against Miami towns. Must rolls of militia must be filed in pay office before warrant granted to Belli.