Viewing 151–164 of 164 documents: "Oconee"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 29, 1796 Treaty at Colerain with the Creek Nation [not available] [not available] Treaty between the United States and the Creek Nation, establishing clear boundaries. The Creeks agree to release all prisoners and annex a portion of their land to the U.S. government. The United States, in return for the Creeks allowing the government to establish trading and military posts on their lands, will allot goods to the value of $6,000 and two blacksmiths to be employed for the Creek...
May 21, 1792 Alliance of the Southern Indians with the Hostile Western Tribes James Seagrove Alexander McGillivray Seagrove informs McGillivray of the positive nature of the negotiations between the United States and the southern tribes. Many of the Creek headmen agree that the activities of William Bowles are subversive in nature and endanger the peace. Seagrove warns particularly of the danger of the southern Indians allying themselves with the hostile western tribes against the US.
May 29, 1800 Instructions to the Incoming Secretary of War James McHenry Samuel Dexter Instructions for McHenry's successor - Samuel Dexter - on important matters of the War Department, including: discharge of the Provisional Army, Indian policy, supply of clothing, trading houses on the western frontier, contractors for cannon, the Corps of Artillerists & Engineers, fortifications, and the establishment of an armory at Harper's Ferry. Also mentions his desire for a National...
August 13, 1790 [Proclamation] George Washington [not available] Peace treaty between United States and Creek Nation. Stipulated that the Creek Nation could not form any alliances with other nations, or pursue a treaty with an individual state. Prisoner exchange to take place. Boundary established, "where the old line strikes the Savannah [river]" extending North to the Keowee, from the top of the Occunna mountain range, to the Tugelo river, additional...
May 29, 1800 Letter to the next Secretary of War James McHenry Samuel Dexter Letter from James McHenry, former Secretary of War, to his successor. McHenry details the state of the Department and points out what needs immediate action. He discusses the state of Indian affairs, the need for a military academy, the establishment of a factory for small arms near Harper's Ferry, and other matters.
August 29, 1789 Instructions to the Commissioners for Treating with the Souther Indians George Washington Commissioners Instructions to Lincoln, Griffin, and Humphreys, Commissioners for negotiating treaties of peace with the Indian tribes and nations south of the Ohio River. The various objects of the mission are detailed, the overarching goal of which is to negotiate peace and, as far as possible, align the interests of the tribes with those of the United States. The commissioners have to negotiate with the...
August 7, 1790 Treaty of New York with the Creek Nation of Indians Henry Knox Senate of the United States This is the Treay of New York concluded between the United States and the Kings, Chiefs, and Warriors of the Creek Nation of Indians.
November 12, 1795 Murder of Peaceful Indians Timothy Pickering George Mathews News of Creeks murder relayed, details supporting the Indians innocence included. Demands murderers to be brought to trial.
October 24, 1796 Secretary McHenry writes to the Governor of Georgia on Creek Indians and assignment of Benjamin Hawkins as agent James McHenry Jared Irwin Secretary at War details federal measures to pacify the frontier to Governor Irwin. Mentions assignment of Benjamin Hawkins as agent.
1793 Copy of a talk from the Big Warrior of the Cussetahs Big Warrior General John Twiggs Undated, but probably around May 1793. Timothy Barnard delivered a talk from Big Warrior of Cussetahs, and two chiefs of same town. Upper Creeks profess continued friendship. Cowetas, Chehaws, Oswitches, Broken Arrow, vow to continue hostilities and refuse to collect and return stolen property. Big Warriors says he has done all he can, and now believes the white man must subdue them; provides...
September 17, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to Georgia Governor Telfair regarding Georgia inhabitant resistance toward his efforts to meet with Creek leadership James Seagrove Henry Knox From Ft Fidius on the Oconee River, Seagrove describes the Georgia inhabitants as being violently against peace with the Creek Nation. Notes that parties of militia are kept out to intercept Seagrove if he attempts to enter the Creek Nation. Describes a scene at Long Bluff whereby some Indians were attacked by Captain Stokes of the militia, an affair which has kept the Indians from coming forward...
November 28, 1788 Letter to General Alexander McGillivray and the Creek Nation George Mathews Creek Chiefs Letter admonishing the Creek Nation for alleged violations of peace, including the destruction and theft of property on nearby plantations.
May 24, 1793 Keeping the Peace following the Robbery and Murder at Traders Hill St Marys, the treachery of Spain in Florida, and punishment of mischievous Creek towns James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove laments the deterioration of the peace on the Georgia frontier since the robbery and murder at Traders Hill. Says that majority of Creeks are peaceful, but their peaceful intentions have been frustrated by the bad men of a few towns. The peaceful chiefs, believing their is nothing more they can do, have asked the United States to send an army to destroy the Cowetas, Broken Arrow a part...
May 2, 1791 A Report on Travels Through the Creek Country, 1791 Caleb Swan [not available] Document, report describes the Creek country, people, culture, and government. Refers to horse theft and trials.