Viewing 101–125 of 164 documents: "Oconee"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 13, 1793 Extract of letter from General Twiggs with additional reason why troops did not proceed during expedition against Creeks at Oakmulgee General John Twiggs [not available] From the files of Executive, William Urquhart and presumably addressed to Governor Telfair, Twiggs notes an additional reason why his troops did not proceed on in the expedition against Creeks at Oakmulgee. Notes that in addition to lack of provisions, he foresaw the likelihood that troops would have killed some of Cusseta nation hunting in small parties. This would have united friendly towns...
October 21, 1793 Present State of Indian Affairs Constant Freeman Henry Knox The Indians dispostion to renew the peace with the United States is hindered only by the lawless action of the frontier inhabitants of Georgia. Major Gaither reports that he is unable to muster the militia since there are presently none in service. Since there is no return from the Governor, it is not certain that a force has been called up to protect the frontiers as ordered by the President.
August 7, 1787 To the Fat King and Other Head-Men of the Lower Creeks. [not available] Fat King Presumably written by the US Indian Agent for the Creeks, refers to the satisfaction demanded for killings of Creeks. Accuses Lower Creeks of not complying with Treaties of Augusta, Galphinton, and Shoulderbone. Closes by saying the hatchet once lifted is not easily buried.
December 1790 Minutes from Benjamin Hawkins relative to the treaties with the Creeks Benjamin Hawkins [not available] Document, minutes relative to treaties with the Creek nation.
September 6, 1793 James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent letter to Georgia Governor Telfair on planned meeting with Creeks on 10 September 1793 James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair From Augusta Seagrove recounts his meeting with the Governor on 5 September 1793 and informs Governor of Georgia Telfair of his plans to meet with the Creeks. He informs Telfair that his mission is in conformity with orders of the President of United States General George Washington and Secretary of War Henry Knox. Seagrove assures the Governor that he will communicate fully on all matters in his...
August 23, 1792 Murder of Young Man by Indians Multiple Authors James Seagrove [A talk From the Kings, chiefs, warriors, and head-men of the Cussetahs and Cowetas, to James Seagrove.] Noted murder of young man by Indians, Cussetahs and Cowetahs did not know the identity of the murderer(s). Asked for patience in finding offending Indian as hunting season is soon. Signs of good faith issued.
August 31, 1793 Deposition of James Aikens describing threats by inabitants of Georgia against Federal Indians agents their employ James Aiken [not available] James Aiken, working for James Seagrove, Creek Indian Agent, describes traveling with goods and baggage of Seagrove along with a free negro named Frederick Chaves. In Washington County Georgia, Aiken and Chaves were confronted by inhabitants and threatened with death because of their service under Seagrove. A Reverend Hutchinson intervened and saved the men's lives. Aiken notes that the people...
September 28, 1793 Extract of letter from Captain Jonas Fauche from the files of executive, Georgia Governor Telfair, reporting on killings of Creek warriors, taking of prisoners Captain Jonas Fauche [not available] In this extract addressed to Georgia Governor Telfair, executive files, Captain Jonas Fauche reports on the Indian theft of horses, killing of Creek warriors, the taking of prisoners, discovery of scalps, and a report that warriors have gone to Cumberland.
October 28, 1793 Letter from Captain Constant Freeman to Secretary of War Henry Knox on renewed prospects for peace with the Creek Nation, inability to receive returns on militia numbers from Governor Telfair's, discrepencies in authorized militia strength and Federal authority to muster militia Constant Freeman Henry Knox Captain Constant Freeman reports that Timothy Barnard [Bernard] suggests renewed chances for peace with the Creek Nation. Prospect for continued peace are tenuous, as inhabitants of Georgia have crossed Oconee River for the purpose of breaking up the Creek Towns. Suggests there are Georgia militia called into service without proper authority. Has suggested Major Gaither appoint inspector to...
November 18, 1793 Extremely Dangerous for Me to Go John McKee William Blount Because of the bloody turmoil on the southwestern frontier resulting in depredations by Georgians and Indians, McKee has been warned by traders that it would be extremely hazardous for him to proceed into Indian country.
September 26, 1793 Letter from W Urquhart on behalf of Georgia Governor Telfair to James Seagrove on conditions for peace with Creek Indians W. Urquhart James Seagrove From the Georgia Statehouse in Augusta, Urquhart relays Governor of Georgia Telfair's requirements on the part of the state of Georgia for peace with the Creek Indians. Captured property and contracts restored; prisoners returned; perpetrators of murders (13) be surrendered; requires 10 headmen of the lower Creek Towns as hostages until requirements fulfilled. State of Georgia will not recognize...
March 27, 1799 Instructions for the New Factor at Fort Wilkinson James McHenry Edward Wright McHenry's instructions to Wright, the new factor of the Indian Trading House near Fort Wilkinson on the Oconee River. It includes matters such as setting prices and accepting credit.
May 21, 1792 Adherence to the Terms of the Treaty of New York James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Seagrove informs Governor Telfair that, after a meeting with the Creek headmen, the tense situation with the Creeks appears to have been resolved on the condition that the terms of the Treaty of New York are met by the United States. The Creeks have been unjustly charged with the murders of a Mr. Yarborough and his son.
June 17, 1796 [The Invitation or talk of the President delivered this day as follows. - To the beloved Men, Chiefs, and Warriors of the Creek Nation.-] George Washington [not available] Cited negotiations in New York that secured a peaceful boundary line in Georgia. However, neither the people of Georgia or Creek Nation were satisfied with boundary and took prisoners and property. Discussed Seagrove's agreement with some Creek chiefs and no additional boundary disputes. Formally invites Creek Nation to Coleraine to formalize peace and trade agreement. Outlines land desired...
April 24, 1799 Price List of Peltries John Harris [not available] Discusses prices for furs purchased from the Creeks, the proper care of the furs before shipment, and the proper method of packing them for shipment. Asks for a list of goods needed by the Factory.
April 18, 1794 French expedition against Spanish Florida Constant Freeman Henry Knox Constant Freeman, agent for the Department of War in Georgia, writes Secretary Knox. Discusses certain persons employed in Georgia to recruit a corps of troops for the service of France, with designs toward invasion of the Spanish Floridas. Apparently the recruiting effort is not going so well, however, and "it is generally believed, by the most sensible and orderly inhabitants of this country,...
September 20, 1797 Report on Spanish Compliance with U.S. Treaty Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Hawkins in want of money, also requested annual stipend due Creek Indians. Reports from the frontier assure him of Spain's compliance with treaty and are vacating land now owned by U.S. Hawkins also noted Cussetuh Chief shot and injured by two men from Hancock County; chief peacefully requested that the men be brought to justice.
June 12, 1793 Letter from Georgia Governor Telfair to Secretary of War Henry Knox on war with Creek Nation, requirement for additional reinforcements, arms, supplies Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox From the State House, Augusta Georgia, Governor Telfair reporting to Secretary of War Henry Knox, that Georgia in a state of alarm. Number of militia drawn into service greater that he expected. From General Twiggs, a report that 700 volunteers will move into the enemy's country. Requests more supplies, swords, pistols. Inquires about the general system to be adopted by President of United...
April 10, 1790 Extinquishing the Indian Claims, Etc. Henry Knox Anthony Wayne Knox discusses the troops that have been ordered to Georgia to maintain peace between the citizens of that State and the Indians on its western frontier. He enunciates the principle that only the government of the United States can negotiate with the Indians respecting the sale of their land.
September 8, 1791 Carrying the Treaty into Effect Henry Knox Alexander McGillivray Knox informs McGillivray, a Creek headman and interpreter, that Andrew Ellicott will be surveying the boundary line until his brother Joseph can join him. Since the boundary was established by the Treaty of New York, it is hoped that the Creeks will cooperate in drawing the line and will assist in maintaining peace on the southwestern frontier.
November 3, 1786 Treaty of Peace, Amity, and Commerce Treaty [not available] Articles of a treaty between the State of Georgia and the "Kings, Head Men, and Warriors" of the Creek Nation. Terms include retribution for the murder of some white settlers, return of property by the Creeks, protection of Creek land, and a system to deal with violations of law. To ensure the treaty, five Creek will stay with the Commissioners.
June 14, 1787 Speech of the Lower Creek chiefs the Hallowing King of the Cowetas and Fat King of Cussetahs. [not available] [not available] Beloved man from Congress was here. Mr McGillivray came over here and matters were settled. Expected that Mr. White would inform the State of Georgia. You always promised that the innocent should not suffer for the guilty. We knew nothing of these bad people or the mischief of the upper towns. Had a meeting with northern Indians lately. Told them we had settled matters with Virginians and could...
September 8, 1796 Instructions to Indian Agent to the Creeks & Other Indians South of the Ohio James McHenry Benjamin Hawkins Official commission and instructions for Benjamin Hawkins, as Principal Temporary Agent for Indian Affairs, within the Indian Nations South of the Ohio, and North of the Territorial Line. Includes instructions for managing trade, seeing to the sale of land between Indians & the states (principally Georgia), overseeing boundaries, etc.
June 13, 1792 Depredations by Bowles' White Wretches James Seagrove Governor Quesada Seagrove advises Gov. Quesada that any depredations by the Creek Indians against the Spanish were probably instigated by white associates of William Bowles. Seagrove assures Quesada that he will transmit to him any information that might be useful to the Spanish government.
August 29, 1796 On the Appointment of an Envoy to Trade, Negotiate & Civilize the Creek Indians James McHenry George Washington Informs the president that the Creek Indians now in negotiations with U.S. commissioners desire a representative to arrange trade, explain boundaries and criminal procedures as they relate to the Indians. Notes that Georgia wishes to make sure the representative is prepared to contend for their interests in purchasing land from the Creeks, as well as establishing a program for civilizing them, as...