Viewing 1–25 of 103 documents: "Occunna Mountain"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
November 19, 1791 Treaty of Protection Henry Knox William Blount United States provides protection to the undersigned Creeks.
August 7, 1790 Treaty at New York with the Creek Nation Henry Knox [not available] Treaty between the United States and Creek Nation. A clear boundary is established and the Creeks cede all land to the north and east of the boundary in exchange for an annual sum of $1,500 paid by the United States government to the Creek Nation. The Creeks agree to release all prisoners and the United States government permits the Creek Nation to punish any U.S. citizen who trespasses onto...
December 5, 1796 Transporting Stores to Pittsburgh Elias Langham Samuel Hodgdon Langham has drawn $500 in favor of William Davidson & Company to be charged in the expense of transporting the stores from Shepherds Town to Pittsburgh. The articles will be shipped in boxes suitable for carrying them safely over the mountain. Should they blocked on the mountain by heavy snow, their fees will be paid for the time they cannont travel.
January 23, 1800 Making Terms With Deserters and Double Rations Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Alexander Hamilton Pinckney expressed his determination in not making terms with deserters until they deliver themselves up. Letter noted, "there are currently three skulking on the Allegheney Mountain" who contacted him but he would do nothing until they come in. Enclosed letter from Freeman which pertained to double rations.
July 2, 1791 Treaty of Holston with the Cherokee Nation of Indians William Blount [not available] Treaty of Peace and Friendship between the U.S. and the Cherokee Nation of Indians regarding land rights and peace.
June 17, 1793 Letter Citation Mountain Leaders General James Robertson Cited in Smith to Knox, 09/27/1793.
October 2, 1798 Treaty with the Cherokee Nation of Indians Thomas Butler [not available] Articles of a Treaty between the United States and the Cherokee Indians.
September 15, 1792 Letter Citation William Blount Henry Knox Enclosed copies of letters from Esquaka (aka Bloody Fellow) and the Glass sent from Lookout Mountain Town notifying U.S. that they successfully deterred the young warriors from waging war against U.S. Information regarding the shooting of W. Cockran and the deaths of two Gillaspies. Some militia will remain on duty to protect against small groups of hostile Cherokees and Creeks.
November 18, 1793 Extremely Dangerous for Me to Go John McKee William Blount Because of the bloody turmoil on the southwestern frontier resulting in depredations by Georgians and Indians, McKee has been warned by traders that it would be extremely hazardous for him to proceed into Indian country.
November 4, 1794 Provisions granted to Indian chief John McKee William Blount Informs Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory that Indian chief Tickagiskee recently arrived at Tellico Block House with about 300 Indians. They requested provisions, which were granted. Writes that Colonel Watts has arrived to negotiate for an exchange of prisoners. Watts has informed him that one or two days before the illegal destruction of the Lower Cherokee towns, Nickajack and...
September 27, 1793 Frontiers are Infested with Indians Daniel Smith Henry Knox Smith reports on the sufferings of the inhabitants of the southwestern frontier. He notes that the Chickasaw head-man Mountain Leader intends to visit the President. The Cherokees are committing frequent depredations including the slaughter of an entire family of thirteen. The Indians are so bold as to be reconnoitering General Sevier's movements and his camp.
November 1, 1794 Illegal attack on Cherokee William Blount Double-head Letter from William Blount, Governor of Southwest Territory, to Double-head, Chief of the Lower Cherokees. Blount warns Double-head that General Logan of Kentucky has raised a "large army of volunteers, unauthorized by Government, to invade and destroy the Lower Cherokee towns." General Logan's reasoning behind the illegal attack is that the Lower towns have provoked violence on the frontier, and...
November 10, 1794 Relations with Cherokee Indians William Blount Henry Knox Letter from Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory to Secretary Henry Knox, regarding relations with Indians in the region. Blount desires to maintain peace with the Cherokee Indians, especially considering the hostility experienced with the Creek Nation. One point of hostility with the Cherokee has been horse stealing, and so the governor has ordered citizens to not buy horses from...
November 23, 1785 Preliminary Speeches by Cherokee Headmen at Treaty of Hopewell [not available] [not available] Tassel of Chota. Refers to red people as the original people of the the land. Presents beads as confirmation of friendship. Refers to encroachment by whites on indian land. Recalls past treaties, then introduces War Woman of Chota, who says she is fond of hearing of peace. The commissioners ask for the boundary lines and Tassel agrees to provide it the following day. Unsuckanail, of New Cusse...
August 27, 1790 Instructions to Governor Blount Regarding the Treaty of Holston Henry Knox William Blount Henry Knox instructs Governor Blount on the President's policies on Indian affairs in the territory south of the Ohio River, especially regarding the Cherokee Indians. He also requests that Blount renegotiate the geographical boundaries of the treaty, and provides detailed instructions on the desired results. He tells Blount about the attack on Major Doughty's party by a small band of Indians,...
November 26, 1793 Flagitious Acts Against Peaceable Indians John McKee William Blount McKee warns that if despicable acts, such as that committed recently against a peaceable Indian, go unpunished, any attempts toward a re-establishment of peace will be in vain.
September 13, 1792 Notification of Divide in Cherokee Nation John Sevier William Blount Sevier invited to join council held in Cherokee nation in town of Chota. At council Sevier was notified that the five lower towns had declared war on United States, J. Watts heads party. Hostile Indians plan on attacking frontier settlements. Assurances that every other part of the Cherokee nation is happily at peace with United States. Special note on Indian town names and names of chiefs...
August 30, 1794 Letter to the Governor of Pennsylvania Edmund Randolph Thomas Mifflin Letter from the Secretary of State to the Governor of Pennsylvania, regarding measures to be taken in relation to the militia, in response to the Whiskey Rebellion.
November 9, 1793 Land as Compensation, Etc. Tench Coxe Samuel Hodgdon [Mostly illegible] Out of the first 1000 acres, 550 acres should be given to a schoolmaster and 50 acres to missionaries [?] of the gospel.
October 12, 1792 Dispersal of the Indian Party Collected for War Henry Knox Anthony Wayne There had been a warning from the Governor of Tennessee that 300-500 hostile Indians were ready to go to war but the intercession of several headmen led to the dispersal of the warriors. As a result, the brigade that had been preparing to confront the Indians was ordered to stand down. The President is expected tomorrow so his orders regarding the disposition of the troops of the Legion will soon...
September 15, 1792 Letters Received from Equaka William Blount Henry Knox Letters received from Bloody Fellow inform Blount that the war parties have dispersed, and he is in the process of discharging regiments.
November 26, 1785 The Headmen Produce their Map and Tassel Addresses the Commissioners [not available] [not available] Discussion on the boundaries. Colonel Richard Henderson called a liar in his dealings. Commissioners point out that Henderson is dead and say that the country believes it has long since been sold. Tassel says it may be too late to recover the land. Commissioners refer to claims of people settled at Nashville Tennessee and the Chickasaws. Tassel and Tuskgahatchee wish to postpone the matter if the...
August 13, 1790 [Proclamation] George Washington [not available] Peace treaty between United States and Creek Nation. Stipulated that the Creek Nation could not form any alliances with other nations, or pursue a treaty with an individual state. Prisoner exchange to take place. Boundary established, "where the old line strikes the Savannah [river]" extending North to the Keowee, from the top of the Occunna mountain range, to the Tugelo river, additional...
May 20, 1789 Autograph Letter Signed, Charles Senf to Henry Knox Charles Senf Henry Knox Letter, discusses proposal of peace.
February 5, 1800 Treaty Allocations for Roads Thomas Butler James McHenry Tellico Treaty, Kentucky Treaty, and Holsten Treaty cited in reference to the building of permanent roads from northern and southern settlements in the U.S. Difficulties building roads due to Cherokees discussed.