Viewing 1–25 of 54 documents: "Oakmulgee"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 13, 1793 Extract of letter from General Twiggs with additional reason why troops did not proceed during expedition against Creeks at Oakmulgee General John Twiggs [not available] From the files of Executive, William Urquhart and presumably addressed to Governor Telfair, Twiggs notes an additional reason why his troops did not proceed on in the expedition against Creeks at Oakmulgee. Notes that in addition to lack of provisions, he foresaw the likelihood that troops would have killed some of Cusseta nation hunting in small parties. This would have united friendly towns...
August 18, 1793 Letter from Georgia Governor Telfair to Secretary of War Henry Knox on General Twiggs' unsucessful expedition to the Oakmulgee Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox From the State House Augusta Georgia, Governor Telfair reports on General Twiggs' failed offensive expedition against the Creeks from the Oconee River to the Oakmulgee. The governor attributes the failure to lack of provisions, tired horses and other adverse events, but nevertheless applauds the prudence of General Twiggs.
September 28, 1793 Extract of letter from Major Henry Gaither to Joshua Meals, Merchant, Augusta Henry Gaither Joshua Meals [In quotation marks], letter from Major Gaither informs merchant Joshua Meals that Gaither will leave for the Oakmulgee next day and will need to furnish James Seagrove with a guard, pack horses and will likely have to accompany Seagrove himself in order to provide protection from several parties of militia.
June 14, 1793 Georgia's Militia Activity against the Creeks Henry Gaither Henry Knox Gaither reporting to Secretary of War Henry Knox, notes that Georgia Militia Major General Twiggs crossed the Oakmulgee River and laid out a fort. Most of the command mutinied and returned. Gaither has heard reports of families killed by Indians in Franklin County [northwest of Augusta near SC], but cannot confirm veracity.
July 28, 1794 Illegal settlement on Creek land Henry Knox George Mathews Secretary Knox informs the Governor of Georgia, George Mathews, that President Washington is quite upset that a group of Georgians in the upper part of the State have illegally erected an "independent government" on territory belonging to the Creek Indians, and erecting forts from the Oconee River to the Oakmulgee River - contrary to the laws of the United States. Knox insists that "we cannot...
April 16, 1795 Hopes for Permission to Pursue Treaty with Indians George Mathews Timothy Pickering Discussed outcome of treaty with Creek Indians. Treaty would destroy Creek Nations claim to land between Oconee and Oakmulgee which Matthews feels is a good outcome with the hope the General government will assist the State in enforcing the outcome. Mentioned how Creek did not comply with Treaty of New York. Hopes to obtain Presidents permission to pursue land treaty.
August 20, 1790 Regarding Treaty of New York between Creeks and United States Henry Knox Governor Edward Telfair President Washington transmits copy of Treaty of New York to Georgia Governor. Asks for faithful execution of the Treaty by both parties. Discusses that land claimed by Georgia was never clearly established. Discusses Treaty of Galphinton and land lying eastward of the forks of Oconee and Oakmulgee to St. Mary's River and between the temporary line and the old line from the Altamaha to the St...
October 1, 1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard [Barnard] from Oakmulgee on peace efforts with Creek Nation Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove Timothy Bernard [Barnard] reporting from Oakmulgee, addressed to James Seagrove, Creek Indian Agent, at Ft Fidius on Oconee. Has sent written correspondence to Warrior King of Cussetahs and spoke with White Lieutenant of Oakfuskees. Has asked White Lieutenant to gather heads of lower towns to explain matters on frontier of Georgia. Reports that Cowetas stole horses and shot at whites and killed...
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to the White Lieutenant of the Oakfuskies on future meeting, prospects for peace, death of David Cornell James Seagrove Chief White Lieutenant Writing from Savannah, Seagrove acknowledges receipt of talks from Mr. Townsend and expresses satisfaction with the peaceful tone. Plans to meet at Oakmulgee 10 September 1793. Notes that it was General Washington who ordered the Georgia militia back from the bad towns in order to give the Creeks time to punish those who committed robbery and murder at Traders Hill St. Marys. Comments on the...
June 13, 1793 Halt of Troop Movement General John Twiggs [not available] General Twiggs informs the Secretary at War that due to a lack of provisions, troop movement was halted. Twiggs states that local procurement of provisions by the troops would alienate friendlys in the area.
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Indian Agent, to Kings, Chiefs, of the Cussetah and all other friends of United States in the Lower Creek Towns James Seagrove Chiefs of the Cussetahs From Savannah, James Seagrove addresses the Kings and Chiefs of the Cussetahs and all other friends of United States in lower Creek Towns. Some of those Indians detained at Seagrove's house have since run away. Expresses disappointment that they left. They were well taken care of. The remaining detainees Seagrove sends via Mordecai and Townsend as a demonstration of good faith. Speaks of death...
November 1, 1790 Judge Pendleton discusses war, land, and treaties with Knox Nathaniel Pendleton Henry Knox Letter, discusses land companies; discusses settlers' aggression toward Indians; war for profit; describes the Combined Society.
September 11, 1793 Report from Captain Constant Freeman to Henry Knox on Georgia militia; muster and pay, James Seagrove's visit with the Creeks and Indian mischief on the frontier Constant Freeman Henry Knox Writing from Augusta, Freeman has met with Georgia Governor Telfair; expects to see appointment of paymaster for militia, along with orders for mustering. Has not been able to obtain a listing of the numbers of troops employed. Governor believes forces should remain at current levels. Notes that in response to Knox's letter ordering a stop to offensive operations by Georgia militia, Governor...
September 28, 1793 Extract of Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to Constant Freeman James Seagrove Constant Freeman From Fort Fidius reports that frontier militia continue to attempt to disrupt peace efforts with Creeks. Believes he could settle matters with satisfaction if not counteracted by bad conduct of people of Georgia. Reports of party under Colonel Alexander, and another from Green County that killed an Indian and took prisoners. Reports that he has written to Georgia Governor Telfair questioning...
July 6, 1793 Murder of Indians and David Cornell, son of Joseph Cornell, the mutinous withdrawal of Georgia militia, and his affidavit regarding financial interest in Indian trade or commerce James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove reports the circumstances surrounding the confrontation and murder of friendly Indians vicinity of Colerain Station and Spanish Creek on St Marys. Reports on McDonald's inconsistent account of events to his commanding officer. Reports on death of David Cornell, son of Joseph Cornell who acted as interpreter with General McGillivray' entourage during treaty negotiations at New York 1790....
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Indian Agent, to Timothy Bernard on death of David Cornell, death of McGillivray and relations with Spaniards, meeting with Chiefs on 10 September 1793, delinquent pay by government of United States, shortage of supplies, assistance of Mr. Jacob Townsend, on the giving of arms to Indians under present circumstances, and orders to capitalize on the kindness Seagrove has shown the detained Indians James Seagrove Charles Weatherford Seagrove believes that the rage over the death of David Cornell will subside. Believes Creek leadership lacks direction since death of Alexander McGillivray. Should capitalize on this opportunity to improve relations; if not, the Spaniards will. Meeting on the Oakmulgee on 10 September 1793 will go as planned; the meeting is based on direction of President of United States General George...
May 3, 1798 Official Statement on the Ceeded Land given to the Creek Indian Nation Multiple Authors House of Representatives Report from Pinckney on the land given to the Creek Indian Nation in treaty held at Shoulderbone and treaty in New York between Creeks and the United States. Compensation is owed the State of Georgia for the ceded land.
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to Charles Weatherford on death of David Cornell, Spaniards, planned meeting on 10 September James Seagrove Charles Weatherford Seagrove, writing from Savannah to Weatherford, laments the death of David Cornell and refers to the stupidity of McDaniel [presumably McDonald] for letting it happen. Spanish have been a thorn in side. Refers to meeting in September as ordered by President of United States General George Washington. Anticipates danger but believes the meeting will be worthwhile.
September 27, 1789 Explanation for Retreat from Former Camp and Prospects for Further Talks Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department McGillivray says he moved camp because he needed food for his horses. Relates that he spoke at length with Colonel Humphreys regarding the contest between Creeks and state of Georgia. Says that when he learned that discussions would not include encroachments or restitution of hunting grounds, or Oconee lands, then he resolved to return to the nation to refer the matter until spring. Nothing...
November 12, 1785 Treaty at Galphinton with the Creeks Commissioners for Treaty of Galphinton, November 1785 [not available] U.S. Commissioners for Indian Affairs in tandem with the Indian Commissioners for the State of Georgia issue this treaty at Galphinton between themselves and the warriors of Creek Nation. Georgia demands that the Creeks restore all Negroes, horses, and other property to their owners.
January 1, 1794 Indians attacked by whites Constant Freeman Governor Edward Telfair Informs the Governor of Georgia of an unfortunate event harming the state's relationship with the Creek Indians. On December 28th the White Bird-tail king and eight Cussetahs, encouraged by assurances of safety from Mr. Seagrove, were hunting when two of them were treacherously murdered by a party of whites. Three white men had appeared to the Indians without arms. The Indians received and...
September 6, 1793 Deposition of Henry Carrel sworn before Jared Irwin Justice of Peace and taken from files of executive W. Urquhart S.E.D. [not available] Jared Irwin From Washington County Georgia, Carrel describes horses stolen on the Long Bluff. Captain Stocks and detachment pursued Indian culprits, killed some, recovered horses, rifles, smooth bore gun and sundry other items and returned without damage except hunger and fatigue.
October 31, 1793 General Indian War May Be Inevitable James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove worries that unless the Governor of Georgia does something to prevent Georgians' incursions into Creek towns, a general Indian war will be inevitable. This possibility is even more likely since the Choctaws and Chickasaws have agreed to aid the Creeks in a war against the United States
May 11, 1794 Conflict between Indians and Georgia militia Constant Freeman Henry Knox Letter from the agent for the War Department in Georgia regarding conflict between the Indians there and the militia. 150 militiamen had attacked a camp of Creek Indians, part in retaliation for the death of Lieutenant Hay. Supposedly a "large party of militia" crossed the Oconee River last night in order to attack Creek towns.
November 19, 1791 Treaty of Protection Henry Knox William Blount United States provides protection to the undersigned Creeks.