Viewing 1–18 of 18 documents: "Oakfuskee"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 14, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to Georgia Governor Telfair requesting support in allowing Oakfuskees to settle matters with Cowetas for injuries done, to stop expeditions into Creek country, to prohibit future expeditions unless authorized by law James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Seagrove asks that the people of Georgia not interfere with Oakfuskee efforts to gains satisfaction for injuries done by Cowetas. Also requests he call off parties of militia assembled in Green and Washington Counties. Asks that Governor issue proclamation forbidding expeditions into Creek territory without proper [federal] authority.
October 5, 1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard [Barnard] to Major Gaither regarding Cowetas horse thieves and revenge for those killed at Little Oakfuskee Village Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither In addressing horse theft, identifies the Cowetas as the culprits and who will be objects of revenge for those killed at Little Oakfuskee Village. Asks Gaither to warn people to be on guard along the river and avoid unnecessary exposure.
May 14, 1794 Georgia Indians Constant Freeman Henry Knox Letter from the Agent for the War Department in Georgia, regarding relations with the Indians on the frontier there.
October 14, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to Henry Knox, on Georgia efforts to undermine peace with Creeks James Seagrove Henry Knox From Fort Fidius, Seagrove laments that his failed efforts at achieving peace with the Creek Nation are entirely owing to the unruly conduct of the people of Georgia. Reports that there are two expeditions on foot against the Creek towns; one party from Green County and other from Washington. Suggests that Georgia Governor Telfair is encouraging this activity. Expresses hope that the...
October 9, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to Henry Knox Secretary of War on militia attack on village of Little Oakfuskees and purported duplicity by Georgia Governor Telfair James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove reports the he has not been able to conduct a peace mission with Creek leadership because of attempts by people of Georgia and militia to interfere with efforts. Recounts the report of Captain Sanford of Georgia Militia, who returned from an expedition of Creek Towns under Colonel Alexander and others, in pursuit of some horse thieves; expedition surprised the friendly town Little...
October 3, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to Georgia Governor Telfair on efforts by Georgia militia to prevent Seagrove from meeting with Creek Chiefs James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Addressed to Georgia Governor and Commander in Chief of State of Georgia Edward Telfair, Seagrove implies that Telfair has been disingenuous with Seagrove. Seagrove recounts instances whereby Georgia Militia attempted to intervene and prevent Seagrove from meeting with the Creek leadership. Seagrove is dismayed that, after meeting with Telfair, and explaining President of United States General...
August 7, 1790 Secret articles of US/Creek Treaty of 07/04/1790. [not available] [not available] This treaty discusses the continuance of U.S. trade with the Creek Nation in the event of war with Spain. McGillivray is appointed U.S. agent to the Creek Nation. U.S. agrees to educate and clothe a number of Creek children not to exceed four.
February 20, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to the White Lieutenant, of the Oakfuskies James Seagrove Chief White Lieutenant Letter from Creek Indian Agent James Seagrove to Chief White Lieutenant of the Oakfuskies. Received a talk from White Lieutenant through medicine of Mr Townsend and Mr Timothy Barnard (interpreter). Seagrove notes that White Lieutenant had not received his letter or present of silverware. Seagrove speaks highly of the Chief. Reports that the great and good father General Washington has high...
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to the White Lieutenant of the Oakfuskies on future meeting, prospects for peace, death of David Cornell James Seagrove Chief White Lieutenant Writing from Savannah, Seagrove acknowledges receipt of talks from Mr. Townsend and expresses satisfaction with the peaceful tone. Plans to meet at Oakmulgee 10 September 1793. Notes that it was General Washington who ordered the Georgia militia back from the bad towns in order to give the Creeks time to punish those who committed robbery and murder at Traders Hill St. Marys. Comments on the...
October 31, 1792 McGillivray's Loyalty & Taking Up Residence Among the Creeks Henry Knox James Seagrove Knox warns that the loyalty of McGillivray should be monitored since he appears to be making overtures to the Spanish. He strongly recommends that Seagrove or other agents take up residence among the Creeks.
December 14, 1793 Statement of Secretary of War to President of United States relative to South Western Frontiers Henry Knox George Washington Statement relative to Southwestern portions of United States, connected with Georgia, Creek Indians. Begins by recounting James Seagrove, Creek Indian Agent, conference with lower Creeks in November 1792. Lower Creeks estimated at about 1000 people. Purpose of conference was to confirm Treaty of New York and to administer necessities, corn and clothing. The meeting was a success and Knox notes...
April 8, 1793 From Tuchabachee: Letter from Mad Dog, The White Lieutenant, David Cornell, Alexander Cornell, Mr Weathorford, and thirteen headmen of Upper Creeks [not available] James Seagrove The authors pledge agreement with James Seagrove's talk. Authors note that they did not listen to northern Indians; do not want to shed any white people's blood. Once went to war against Cumberland people, but since Seagrove's talk don't intend to go to war. Mad Dog's brother and nephew went into Chickasaw leader's house and killed them both. Tried to keep peace with all colors, but they...
December 16, 1793 Report on the Southwestern Frontier and the Creek Indians Henry Knox George Washington Report relative to the Southwestern frontiers of the United States, as connected with the State of Georgia and the Creek Indians, and the territory of the United States South of the Ohio and the Cherokee Indians.Knox believes that, with the exception of a few lawless banditti Indians, the Creeks are amenable to a peaceful settlement and if the depredations of several lawless whites can be...
November 30, 1793 Acts of Hostility and Depredations Must Cease James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove reports on his visit to the Lower towns where he was received with warmth and friendship but if reconciliation is to be attained with the entire Creek nation, transgressions and depredations by both whites and Indians must be halted and those guilty of misdeeds on both sides must be punished.
December 4, 1793 Statement of Secretary of War to President of United States relative to South Western Frontiers Henry Knox George Washington Knox recounts that during November 1792, Creek Indian Agent James Seagrove was successfully pursuing peace efforts with the Creek Nation until prospects were clouded on 11 March 1793 with the robbery and murder by Seminolas Indians at Robert Seagrove's store at Traders Hill on St Marys. Governor of Georgia Telfair called out Georgia Militia for protection of inhabitants. Knox relates that he...
October 21, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to Georgia Governor Telfair regarding exchange of prisoners, prospects for peace, and expedition of Georgia militia against Creek Towns James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair From Ft Fidius, Seagrove informs Georgia Governor Telfair on favorable prospects for peace with Creek Nation. Good likelihood that inhabitants of Oakfuskee village will take satisfaction on Coweta horse thieves for those killed. White Lieutenant of Oakfuskees, and other principal chiefs want the prisoners sent home. Assures Telfair that equal number of white prisoners, if there exists that many,...
February 13, 1799 Statement of Facts Relative to the Georgia Militia Constant Freeman William Simmons Freeman clarifies the situation regarding the Georgia militia and the US Army beginning in 1793. Freeman asserts that he was never properly informed the total number of militia active in the state, and determined that those not mustered were unauthorized by Congress and the Department of War, although they were activated by the Governor.
May 2, 1791 A Report on Travels Through the Creek Country, 1791 Caleb Swan [not available] Document, report describes the Creek country, people, culture, and government. Refers to horse theft and trials.