Viewing 1–25 of 237 documents: "Live Ceasar"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
January 30, 1797 Regarding Live Oak on Frigates Josiah Fox Tench Francis Letter, discusses live oak cargo for Frigates.
August 18, 1796 Discussion of Availability of Live Oak for Frigate Timbers George Claghorn Josiah Fox Letter, discusses availability of live oak for Frigate.
March 15, 1798 Regarding use of the live oak [not available] Mr. Blight Secretary of War does not feel at liberty to alter in any manner the [illegible] of live oak.
August 25, 1796 Discussion of Live Oak Timbers for Frigate Building Captain Samuel Nicholson Josiah Fox Discusses live oak timbers for ships' frames, and the completion of a number of such material components for the building of a frigate.
March 6, 1795 Circular Letter from Secretary at War to Naval Agents on the use of live oak, deadwood and white oak for frigate construction Timothy Pickering [not available] There is a question on whether enough live oak could be obtained for frigate construction. It is now found that enough live oak may possibly be obtained. Therefore the white oak prepared should be laid aside temporarily until it can be confirmed that enough live oak can be procured.
September 12, 1795 Shipment of live oak; authority to use a Maryland oak [not available] Captain Thomas Truxtun Live oak received at Baltimore. Authorized to use a Maryland oak for the lower stem piece if the live oak does not arrive.
March 29, 1796 Letter from the War Office on the overdue delivery of live oak from Georgia [not available] David Stodder Live oak for the dead wood from Georgia is long overdue. Therefore, Stodder has permission to use white oak for pieces that were directed to be made of live oak. This white oak can be found, according to Captain Truxton, in the Maryland countryside. Closes by discussing matters of pay.
February 14, 1796 Discussion of Supplying Live Oak Timbers for Frigates Captain Thomas Truxtun Josiah Fox Letter, discusses supply of live oak for Frigates; mentions Congress.
December 9, 1795 Letter from the War Office expressing concern that naval constructor misapplying live oak [not available] Captain Samuel Nicholson Issue of whether deadwood needs to be white oak. Suggests that constructor is mistaken. Live oak generally required in the places most susceptible to decay. Instructs Captain Nicholson to order naval constructor George Claghorn to use live oak on for the purpose intended.
June 7, 1797 Discussion of Live Oak Timbers Tench Francis Josiah Fox Letter, discusses live oak timber.
May 13, 1796 Request for live oak to complete body frame of frigate at Philadelphia [not available] John Blagge Joshua Humphreys in need of live oak to complete body frame of frigate at Philadelphia. Because it will be easier to procure from the ship yard at New York than from Georgia, Blagge is ordered to send live oak timbers to Philadelphia. Since work at Philadelphia has been suspended on account of wanting live oak timbers, Blagge instructed to send timbers immediately.
April 6, 1795 Return of men working in the New York yard; arrival of live oak and planks Captain Silas Talbot Timothy Pickering Return of men employed at the New York naval yard for the previous three weeks; live oak and plank have arrived, but the quantities have yet to be surveyed.
July 15, 1796 Request for Naval Supplies, Including Live Oak Timbers for Frigates David Stodder Josiah Fox Encloses a statement of timber wanted for frigate construction at Baltimore, needed as soon as possible.
May 14, 1796 Suspension of Request to Send Live Oak for Frigate Construction at Philadelphia [not available] John Blagge Requests cancellation of previous request to ship live oak from New York to Philadelphia until contents of cargo is known from vessel from Georgia laden with live oak.
July 15, 1796 Request for Live Oak Timbers for Frigate Construction Captain Thomas Truxtun Josiah Fox Letter, asks for live oak to complete Frigate frame.
September 24, 1797 Regarding Major Tousard's unauthorized use of live oak deposited at Mud Island [not available] Tench Francis Regarding Major Toussard and unauthorized use of live oak at Mud Island. Requests an immediate stop.
December 20, 1794 Report on the Building of Frigates Joshua Humphreys Unknown Recipient Report on the construction of the first frigates of the U.S. Navy. Live oak and red cedar will be the materials of choice, though white oak was used for the floor timbers. Captain Barry is certain that live oak may be procured from Georgia, and because of the rapid rate of decay of white oak the cost computed over 40-50 years is the same as live oak. Building a mold loft os too expensive a...
May 6, 1797 Discussion of Frigate Construction Materials: Copper Sheathing & Live Oak Timber Josiah Fox [not available] Letter, discusses coppering Frigate; mentions live oak for Frigate.
May 24, 1796 Request to redirect the vessel laden with live oak to Philadelphia with utmost dispatch [not available] Captain Silas Talbot Request to redirect the schooner laden with live oak to Philadelphia with dispatch without unloading any cargo at New York. The live oak is hoped to complete the frame of the frigate at Philadelphia.
January 17, 1795 On the keel wood for frigate; salting of oak wood; and whether oak wood is preferable to live oak Timothy Pickering Tench Francis Secretary of War Pickering discusses use of deadwood to be laid over the frigate keel; use of salting to harden the oak; and whether common oak will do, since live oak is so hard to procure. In a post script, asks if common oak can be used. If not, how long to obtain live oak and how will this affect the frigate construction time-line.
January 31, 1800 National Defense James McHenry Harrison Gray Otis Letter from the Sec. of War to the Chairman of the committee on national defense. Discussed the radical changes to current militia that would create a more organized and well trained standing army. Supported the formation of a standing army for superior defense of the U.S. Reference Roman military and Ceasar. Lists salaries of various officers and educators along with cost of building...
June 7, 1797 Letter from the War Office to the Purveyor of Public Supplies requesting valuation of live oak timber at Mud Island Fort Josiah Fox Tench Francis Secretary of War requests valuation of live oak timber at Mud Island Fort and what remains at Georgia. Likely he wishes to lay figures before congress.
June 29, 1795 Letter from the War Office on Colonel Copperthwait's report regarding difficulties in procurement of live oak Timothy Pickering Tench Francis Regarding reduction in Frigate production. Colonel Copperthwait returned from an inspection in Georgia on the harvesting of live oak for frigate timber. He estimates it will take one year to procure and deliver the live oak, leaving the ship yards in a lingering condition at heavy public expense. Pickering will suspend operations for four of the constructors at the ship yards of Portsmouth New...
June 1, 1796 Request for statement of live oak timbers required to complete frigate frame [not available] David Stodder Naval Constructor Stodder is to provide a list of live oak timbers required to complete frame of frigate at Baltimore in order to take measures to provide such from navy yards at New York and Norfolk. Pickering expresses wish to complete frigate construction by end of year. Therefore, prosecute with dispatch.
March 6, 1795 Circular Letter to the Naval Agents & Discussion of Naval Timber War Department [not available] This circular letter to Naval Agents discusses the best timber to use for frigates.