Viewing 1–25 of 132 documents: "Keyaton, or a standing tree"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
January 25, 1794 The Sad Affair of Capt. Big Tree of the Seneca Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Captain Big Tree, the Seneca chief, has committed suicide for unknown reasons; mentions that he was a companion of Cornplanter and New Arrow. Records a speech given by Big Tree at that time, lamenting the death of Gen. Richard Butler (at St. Clair's Defeat), and asking to join the U.S. forces that he may avenge Butler's death. Mentions Big Tree's recent arrival and promise to rally friendly...
1797 Dimensions of the Rigging for the Frigate "Constitution" Unknown Author [not available] A memorandum that describes the standing rigging for the U. S. Frigate "Constitution."
July 10, 1793 Helping My Brothers, the Americans Big Tree Anthony Wayne Wayne had promised Big Tree that when he marched against the hostile Indians Big Tree would accompany him. Since the United States is seeking peace with the hostile Nations, Big Tree will join the Six Nations at the treaty as they endeavor to accomplish peace. He will always do whatever is in his power to help his brothers the Americans.
August 10, 1799 Obtaining a Commission in the Standing Army William Cumming Samuel Hodgdon As coppersmith's and tinman's business is currently very slow, Cumming requests Hodgdon's assistance in obtaining a lieutenant's commission in the standing army of the United States. He is a man of strong conviction with a recommendation from James Ash.
October 20, 1789 Census of Six Nations Giving Numbers and Names of Tribes and Heads of Families at Grand River and on the Ohio Reverend Samuel Kirkland [not available] Census, describes Six Nations population; describes Indian population. The total of the Six Nations population is listed at 3665
January 5, 1800 A Report on the Secretary of War, On certain measures which appear to him to be necessary for the improvement of our Military System. James McHenry [not available] Report detailing necessary improvements to the current military system. Advocates for a standing army and necessary fortifications and education systems to produce and maintain said military.
December 7, 1795 An act to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States. Jonathan Dayton [not available] Enacted into law standing outfit of dragoons, engineers, and artillerists. Describes in detail the governance and organization of this section of the military.
July 26, 1791 Speech to the Northwestern Indians Major General Richard Butler Northwestern Indian Chiefs Speech delivered to the Indians concerning a letter from the Governor of the Northwestern Territory, Arthur St. Clair. Speech delivered by Lieutenant Jeffers and endorsed by Richard Butler.
January 13, 1800 Message from the President of the United States, transmitting a Report of the Secretary of War, On certain measures which appear to him to be necessary for the improvement of our Military System. John Adams [not available] Official report addressing recommendations for improving the U.S. military. Argued for a well funded standing army.
January 31, 1790 Knox solicits Lincoln's opinion of his militia plan Henry Knox Benjamin Lincoln Knox solicits General Lincoln's opinion of his plan for the establishment of a national militia.
April 17, 1784 Order to cease cutting wood Samuel Hodgdon William Each Order to cease cutting wood on land belonging to the public and under rent to an officer.
February 21, 1790 Jackson advises that Knox's militia plan is not well received Henry Jackson Henry Knox Letter, discusses plan for militia.
1792 Symbols on the American Medal Rufus Putnam [not available] The author explains to the Indians the symbols on the American medal.
September 1797 Farmer's Brother Speech possibly made at Treaty of Seneca or Big Tree treaty negotiations in September 1797. Farmer Brother the King [not available] Farmer's Brother wants all of the annuities at once. He expects that surveyors will survey the lands, and hopes the U.S. will send a surveyor they can confide in so they will not be cheated. He expects the interpreter Jaspar Parish to be appointed in order to have errors in surveying explained. He wants all the surveys to be done at no expense to his nation. He hopes the white people will not...
August 22, 1799 Expresses Concern about Cherokees Returning Stolen Horses David Henley Standing Turkey Expresses appreciation for Standing Turkey's advice to other chiefs of the Cherokee nation as a good example. Refers to Little Turkey's recommendation to return all stolen horses, but would rather that Little Turkey actually return the horses instead of just recommending. Urges both whites and Indians to resolve matter. Urges peace and resolving distress of poor families by returning horses.
May 23, 1800 "Democratic Influence" in Government Isaac Craig Samuel Hodgdon Due to the military reductions that were occasioned by a new "democratic influence" in government, Major Craig offers sympathies to Samuel Hodgdon for being removed from office. Craig also expresses regret that Colonel Pickering was among those fired. Craig is referring to the ascension of Thomas Jefferson into the White House, along with the Democratic-Republicans in Congress - the opposition...
October 4, 1799 A Most Violent Breach of Civil Authority William C. Bentley Alexander Hamilton Bentley recounts an incident in which several soldiers helped an accused horse thief to escape from the local jail. He is concerned not only about the incident itself but also about how it has been covered by what he calls the Jacobin printers, (meaning the anti-federalist press) as they continue to find fault with the "Standing Army."
November 15, 1792 Letter Citation Standing Turkey William Blount Cited in McHenry to U. S. House of Represenatives, 01/05/1798.
July 30, 1796 Notification to Prepare Standing Company of Dragoons James McHenry Anthony Wayne Creek Indians refuse to sell land to Georgia. Relations of frontier people in New York uncertain. Per recent Act of Congress, McHenry requested Wayne prepare standing companies of dragoons to patrol land between posts in New York and Georgia to provide safety for garrisoned troops.
January 18, 1794 Supplement: Truce with Indians, and Considerations of Possible Treaty Anthony Wayne Henry Knox Supplement to prior letter of same date; Wayne laments the arrival of the Indians' truce flag, as he was set to seize Girtystown (now St. Mary's Ohio), in the center of the hostile tribes' region, but says he could not refuse the gesture. Truce of three days set, will not advance for that period. Considers merits of two possible treaty sites, Picquetown or Grand Glaize. Asks for instructions,...
January 31, 1800 National Defense James McHenry Harrison Gray Otis Letter from the Sec. of War to the Chairman of the committee on national defense. Discussed the radical changes to current militia that would create a more organized and well trained standing army. Supported the formation of a standing army for superior defense of the U.S. Reference Roman military and Ceasar. Lists salaries of various officers and educators along with cost of building...
December 29, 1790 The reply of the President of the United States to the speech of the Cornplanter, Half-Town, and Great-Tree, Chiefs and Councillors of the Seneca nation of Indians. George Washington [not available] Asks that his speech be kept in remembrance of the friendship of the United States. Asks that the miseries of the late war be forgotten. Acknowledges difficulties with sales of land; notes that General Government is only authority for such sales and treaties. Says that John Livingston was not legally authorized to treat; but no evidence that Oliver Phelps defrauded. Mentions the fatherly care...
December 1, 1790 The speech of the Cornplanter, Half-Town, and the Great-Tree, Chiefs and Councillors of the Seneca nation, to the Great Councillor of the Thirteen Fires. Cornplanter, Chief of the Senecas [not available] Refers to Washington as the town destroyer. Wish to open their hearts. Mention Treaty of Fort Stanwix. Mentions the resentment toward Six Nations for supporting British during Revolutionary War. Refers to past broken promises regarding treaty lines drawn by Commissioners. Mention John Livingston and Mr. Phelps and dubious land claims and threats of war. Phelps never paid what he promised. Indians...
February 10, 1792 Indian Attacks and Employment of Spies Henry Knox John Jeffers Discussion over attacks from Allegheny Indians. Advised seeking help from Big Tree and other Indians that would defend the U.S. Promised support and supplies from U.S. for all involved. Advised employment of scouts from Fort Franklin to Fort McIntosh with movement to Lake Erie. Request for returns.
April 24, 1798 Settling Lt. Hyde's Accounts William Simmons James McHenry Simmons informs McHenry that since 1st Regiment Paymaster Lt. Charles Hyde is in Philadelphia, he should be brought in to settle his long-standing accounts which are of great magnitude.