Viewing 1–25 of 29 documents: "Kaskaskias"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 2, 1797 Reported Sightings of General Wilkinson James McHenry Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Mr. Lewis has reported that Wolcott was surprised that there is a strong possibility that General Wilkinson is in the southwestern territory at the head of an army. Wilkinson was last seen in Detroit where a possible revolt among the French settlers at Kaskaskias had been reported.
November 3, 1794 Hostile Indians crossing Mississippi Thomas Pasteur Anthony Wayne Captain Thomas Pasteur writes Major General Anthony Wayne that he has been informed by the Kaskaskias that hostile Indians are crossing the Mississippi River every day. Copies a handbill from the British recruiting volunteers for Governor John Graves Simcoe of Upper Canada.
December 22, 1795 Treaty of Greenville George Washington Unknown Recipient Peace treaty between United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Chipewas, Potowatamies, Eel-River, Weeas Kickapoos, Piankashaws, Kaskaskias, and Miamis. Prisoner release negotiated and borders decided upon.
February 27, 1794 Report on the Petition of John Edgar Alexander Hamilton Frederick A Muhlenberg The Secretary of Treasury reports on the petition of John Edgar of Kaskaskias to the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Edgar claims to have given gifts to various Indian tribes in Illinois Country, in order to pacify their hostility to white settlers moving west. Edgar claims that he should be compensated for the gift-giving, since it was essential to preserving the lives and property of...
December 7, 1789 Regarding lack of pay, want of judges, Indian affairs and white migration Winthrop Sargent Henry Knox Acting Governor Sargent laments that he has not yet received his salary of $750. Governor St. Clair has not yet arrived. When he does, will commence tour of Kaskaskias. The territory is in need of judges. Of Indians nothing heard. the last intelligence was a speech of friendship by Delawares and Wyandottes to General Harmar. The migration is under watch by Fort Harmar at Marietta Ohio and is...
December 8, 1796 Treaty of Greeneville Cannot Be Amended; Regarding Gifts & White Presences on Indian Land James McHenry Northwestern Indian Chiefs Addressed to the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Poutawatomies, Miamis, Eel River, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankashaws and Kaskaskias. Transmits the president's response to some Indians' request that slightly different land concessions and boundaries be agreed upon, to the effect that the conditions of the Treaty of Greeneville cannot be changed now that it has been ratified by the...
October 25, 1798 Speech to Captain Thomas Pasteurs Jean Baptiste Duquesne [not available] Speech, by Ducayne, discusses murder & horse theft; discusses White encroachment; alludes to Indian retaliation. Document also contains Capt. Pasteurs reply to Jean Baptist Ducayne.
December 8, 1796 Speech at Conference with Indian Chiefs, Treaty Cannot Be Amended James McHenry [not available] McHenry's speech to the assembled chiefs, on behalf of the president. Tribes represented: Wiandots [Wyandots], Delawares, Shawanees [Shawnees], Ottawas, Chippewas, Putawatimies, Miamis, Eel River, Weeas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias. States that the president has considered the Indians' requests that some land sold in the treaty be remitted to them, as well as a formal marking of the...
November 29, 1796 Conference with the Several Indian Chiefs Assembled, & Washington's Reply George Washington [not available] Various Indian chiefs speak on rights to land, inclinations to peace over war, and a recent treaty. Tribes represented: Wiandots [Wyandots], Delawares, Shawanees [Shawnees], Ottawas, Chippewas, Putawatimies, Miamis, Eel River, Weeas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias. George Washington's response to these follows, which discusses points of the treaty, such as that the Indians are to...
July 29, 1796 Concerning French movements on the frontier Thomas Pasteur Anthony Wayne Describes French movements on the frontier, including missionaries and relations with Indians.
October 3, 1796 Directing a lookout for French agents on the frontier Anthony Wayne Thomas Pasteur General Wayne directs a lookout for French agents on the frontier and provides a brief update on Indian relations.
August 3, 1795 Treaty of Greenville Henry De Butts [not available] Peace treaty between the United States and the Northwest Indian Confederacy, comprised of the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawnees, Kickapoos, Weas, Ottawas, Chippewas, Putawatomie, Miami, & Eel River tribes. Dictates the end of hostilities, the return of prisoners, cessions of land to the U.S., the new Indian-U.S. boundary, right of white passage over Indian land and waterways, the relinquishment of...
November 29, 1796 Indian Request for Equal Support and Supplies Blue Jacket [not available] Refers to Indian treaties with several different tribes concerning boundaries. Request permission to maintain current forms of farming. Understands that Christian Indians receive special assistance from the US. Requests Indian land, supplies, food for family. Requests that all Indian nations receive equal assistance. Refuses to punish the young men he loves.
November 8, 1792 Peace with the Wabash and Illinois Indians Henry Knox United States Senate Knox informs the Senate that a treaty of peace has been reached with sundry tribes of the Wabash and Illinois Indians and sixteen Wabash chiefs are due to arrive soon in Philadelphia
September 19, 1799 Prohibiting the Sale of Liquor to Indians, Etc. John Francis Hamtramck Alexander Hamilton Hamtramck reports from his post at Detroit on matters ranging from the drunkness of the local Indians to the erroneous report from Colonel Srong on the prevalence of Indian hostility.
June 20, 1794 Council of Vincennes, Speeches by Chiefs, Warriors, and Captain Pasteur [not available] [not available] All tribes had traveled far to meet General Washington and make their people one, offering wampum. Request for guns and land on either side of the Mississippi or near Wabash. French and Indian Nations requested pity from the United States for their efforts of peace and the suffering they endured by the British and Spaniards.
October 10, 1792 Indian Attacks William Blount Henry Knox Received news on attack upon Buchanan's station, relayed details of attack and Indian movement since that time. Settlers of Cumberland in good spirits while erecting block houses and stockades to protect from Indian attacks.
November 24, 1787 Describes Geography, Inhabitants, Indians, Activity Surrounding Kaskaskias Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Impossibility to gather in all Indian chiefs--rather, he traveled the fatiguing journey to Kaskaskia. Describes geography and inhabitants, including Indians and chiefs with peace pipes, and French and American settlers. Describes settlements and buildings. Explains to settlers the proprietary of possessions on contested land. Visited with Spanish settlers. Advised settlers to rouse their militias...
September 11, 1796 French movements on the frontier and acquisition of Louisiana Territory from Spain Thomas Pasteur Anthony Wayne Describes movements of French agents on the frontier and their relation with Indians. Pasteur reports that James Johnson has said that the United States has "very few friends" in that region. Pasteur concludes by informing General Wayne that the Spanish plan to give the Louisiana Territory to France within two years and that 3,000 French troops are stationed in New Orleans.
May 28, 1800 Instructions for Indian Presents James McHenry John Harris Indian nations mentioned to receive annuities from the United States include Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Miamis, Patawatomies, Shawanees, Creeks, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Eel River, Weeas, Piankishaws, and Kickapoos, with amounts (in value of goods) listed. Also lists any specific goods meant for the Indians -- if the value of the mentioned goods does not reach the total amount to be...
April 21, 1797 Pay of Private Whaling, Prisoner Peter Hagner James McHenry Certification that $160.58 is due Pvt. Michael Whaling of Capt. Ford's Company, being the balance of pay due him up to Nov. 4, 1794, the day he was reported to have been killed, and his pay from Nov. 5, 1791 to Sept. 6, 1795, the day he was delivered out of captivity from among the Indians at the Treaty of Greenville.
November 29, 1796 Washington's Speech to the Indians on How to Honor the Treaty of Greeneville George Washington Northwestern Indian Chiefs Address to the [Northwest] Indian Confederacy comprised of the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawnee, Kickapoo, Wea, Ottawa, Chippewa, Putawatomie, Miami, Kaskaskia, Piankeshaw & Eel River tribes. Endeavors to give them advice surrounding the [Treaty of Greeneville], now ratified by the Senate. Explains the provision that the Indians not sell any of their land except to the U.S. Recommends that the Indians...
February 9, 1798 On the conduct of General Wilkinson James McHenry James Wilkinson Scolds Wilkinson for the publication of orders in the Pittsburgh Gazette, which he argues may undermine morale. Criticizes Wilkinson for not informing him of his change of plans from going to Fort Massac into going to Pittsburgh instead. Also criticizes Wilkinson for suggesting that he has not acted in accordance to the will of President Adams, explaining that he does not feel it necessary to...
August 3, 1795 Treaty of Greenville Timothy Pickering [not available] Certified copy of official Treaty of Greenville that secures peace between the United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawnees, Shawanoes, Ottawas, Chippewas, Potawatimes, Miamis, Eel River, Weeds, Kickapoos, Piankashaws, and Kaskaskias. Outlines boundaries, trade, agriculture, and civil rights.
November 20, 1800 Estimate of Expenses for the US Army, 1801 Samuel Dexter Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Encloses estimates of expenses of the Army of the United States for the year 1801. Enclosure lists staff, numbers, and salaries and forage for each department. References clothing, horses, supplies, and bounties. Outlines Indian tribes. Lists several locations and branches.