Viewing 1–25 of 2,776 documents: "Indian treaties"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 3, 1789 Questions regarding legitimacy of previous treaties between Creeks and Georgia Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton Request for information regarding treaties at Augusta, 1783, Galphinton, 1785, and Shoulderbone, 1786. Principal points are whether all lands belonging to the upper and lower Creeks are common property of whole nation, or whether the lands were ceded to Georgia by the three treaties. Were the proprietors of the lands stated to have been ceded to Georgia present or fully represented by the...
June 1, 1790 Disbursments made by the War Department for treaty with Indians Ezekiel Freeman [not available] Account of sundry disbursements for Indian Treaties.
May 19, 1786 Presentation of Papers on Indian Treaties William Livingston Assembly Livingston lays before the (New Jersey) House congressional papers dealing with Indian treaties and accounts between the states, as well as resolutions from Massachusetts and Pennsylvania appointing delegates to the Annapolis Convention.
April 22, 1786 Indian treaties signed Charles Thomson Patrick Henry Letter to the Governor of Virginia covering copies of treaties signed by the commissioners of Congress with the Shawnee, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Indians.
November 12, 1792 War Department expenditures for treaties with Indians Joseph Nourse [not available] Account of monies disbursed by Knox for Indian treaties. Certified true copy signed by Register of the Treasury, Joseph Nourse.
October 4, 1789 Regarding legitimacy of previous treaties between Creeks and Georgia George Walton Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Governor of Georgia notes that previous treaties, namely Augusta 1783, Galphinton 1785, and Shoulderbone 1786, between Georgia and Creeks, were legitimately agreed upon by both parties.
February 2, 1797 List of Indian treaties between 1786-1796 War Department Andrew Pickens A list provided to Major General Andrew Pickens of the four major Indian treaties signed between 1786 and 1796.
August 26, 1790 Proclamation by the President regarding treaties made at Hopewell, on the Keowee River between United States and Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations of Indians George Washington [not available] Washington states that it is particularly necessary to warn the citizens of the United States against a violation of treaties made at Hopewell on Keowee River in 1786; and to "enforce an act to regulate trade and commerce with the Indian tribes." All officers and citizens will govern themselves according to the treaties and act aforesaid. Discussed land rights for citizens of North Carolina.
June 3, 1784 Congressional Resolution Calling for Militia to Indian Nation Congress of the United States War Department Congressional resolution, signed by Secretary Charles Thomson, directing the Secretary at War to raise militia and provisions necessary to accompany Indian negotiators. Resolved that the Superintendent of Finance provide necessary articles for Indian commissioners to negotiate treaties. Promises support of Secretary, messengers, interpreters, store keepers, and other officers.
November 12, 1792 Expenditures for Indian Treaties Henry Knox [not available] Account, Expenditures for Indian treaties.
October 29, 1792 [PRIVATE] Indian Treaties Winthrop Sargent Henry Knox Capt. Mayette to deliver letter of introduction, has been commissioned based on recommendations from the Governor. Mentioned taking sides, Mayette's influence with the Indians, possible payoff from British and Spanish. Discussed purchasing additional people for increasing American influence over hostile Indian tribes. Imparts personal preference for Indian treaties.
April 22, 1786 Indian Treaties Signed Charles Thomson John Langdon Letter to the President of New Hampshire covering copies of treaties signed by the commissioners of Congress with the Shawnee, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Indians.
August 26, 1789 Request for Loan Henry Knox President, Directors, & Company of Bank of New York Immediate loan for Indian Commissioners to negotiate treaties.
April 2, 1791 Excerpts of Treaties Establishing the Western Border with the Creek and Cherokee Indians. Henry Knox [not available] Knox's letter establishes that the western boundary of the United States, where it comes into contact with the territory of the Creek and Cherokee Indians, has been firmly established by several treaties the tribes have signed with Georgia and South Carolina. The letter contains excerpts from several of the various treaties to illustrate where boundary lines were considered to have been drawn in...
May 2, 1789 A report on the Treaty of Fort Harmar, concluded with several of the Indian Nations Arthur St. Clair George Washington St. Clair presents the treaties concluded with several of the Indian Nations in January 1789. Discusses extension of northern boundary to the 41st degree of north latitude, which was not accomplished for fear of defeating the peace process. The negotiation was tedious and tiresome. There are still some ill-disposed tribes. There were separate treaties with the Six Nations and Wyandots because of...
February 16, 1793 Outlines Relations with Indians about Truce, Treaty of Fort Harmar, and Borders Henry Knox George Washington Requests that commissioners be informed of all treaties & boundaries with northern and western Indians. Refers to Indian lands ceded or purchased to the U.S., questioning to which tribes the land "belonged" and how to draw appropriate boundaries. Seeks truce between young Indian warriors and United States military for the next five to seven years.
July 1, 1796 Indian affairs and treaties Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry General Superintendent of Indian Affairs Benjamin Hawkins describes the Treaty of New York of 1790, the Creek Nation, Indian boundaries, and murders on the frontier.
August 7, 1787 To the Fat King and Other Head-Men of the Lower Creeks. [not available] Fat King Presumably written by the US Indian Agent for the Creeks, refers to the satisfaction demanded for killings of Creeks. Accuses Lower Creeks of not complying with Treaties of Augusta, Galphinton, and Shoulderbone. Closes by saying the hatchet once lifted is not easily buried.
August 10, 1790 Knox discusses Indian affairs Henry Knox [not available] Letter, discusses Indian treaty; advises re details of passage.
October 17, 1791 Hamilton forwards the intentions of the President to Knox Alexander Hamilton Henry Knox Letter, directs details of President's letter; mentions white aggression; mentions Indian treaties.
September 6, 1790 Documents for William Blount Henry Knox Beverley Randolph Enclosed documents for Blount, new governor of territory ceded by North Carolina. Details of location included. Includes proclamations by President Washington concerning Indian treaties.
January 13, 1796 Commissioners' allowance for treaties Timothy Pickering John Jay Letter from the Secretary of War to the Governor of New York. Secretary Knox discusses the allowance paid commissioners for holding treaties with the Indians.
December 23, 1787 To the Chiefs and Warriors of the Shawnee Nation, Concerning Past & Future Treaties Major General Richard Butler Chiefs of the Shawnees Discusses the effect of recent Congressional decisions upon U.S.-Indian relations, and asks for a specific treaty meeting with the Delawares and Shawnees. Professes U.S. goodwill toward the Indians.
March 1, 1793 Act to Regulate Trade & Intercourse with Indian Tribes Congress of the United States [not available] This is an extract of an Act of Congress that declares that no purchase of Indian lands shall be valid unless pursuant to the Constitution. Therefore, it is illegal for anyone but lawful agents to negotiate treaties for land.
July 31, 1793 Speech Regarding Possession of Land and Past Treaties with Indian Confederacy Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky Deputies of the Confederation of Indian Nations Commissioners agreed the boundary line set at the Treaty of Fort Stanwix between the Indians and the British colonies was the Ohio River, but future treaties ceded tracts of land to the U.S. and therefore they could not remove settlers from the land.