Viewing 1–5 of 5 documents: "Hogex, cut asunder"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
January 9, 1789 Copy of Articles between the Chiefs of the Six Nations of Indians and the Commissioners of Pennsylvania [not available] Chiefs Six Nations Article one states that when articles are signed, said chiefs will execute deed of conveyance to State of Pennsylvania. Article two outlines the boundary lines and states that chiefs will acknowledge soil to be vested to State of Pennsylvania. Article three gives state of Pennsylvania permission to conduct surveys. Article four gives free navigation of rivers to people of State. Article five...
October 20, 1789 Census of Six Nations Giving Numbers and Names of Tribes and Heads of Families at Grand River and on the Ohio Reverend Samuel Kirkland [not available] Census, describes Six Nations population; describes Indian population. The total of the Six Nations population is listed at 3665
January 9, 1789 Treaty of Fort Harmar: Between the United States and the Six Nations Arthur St. Clair Chiefs Six Nations Agreement between the United States government and Indian tribes with claims to the Ohio Country. Representatives of the Six Nations, the Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawatomi and Sauk met with Arthur St. Clair governor of the Northwest Territory, and other American leaders Josiah Harmar and Richard Butler.
December 27, 1796 Response to Cherokee John Watts' Concerns Over Boundaries, Etc. James McHenry John Watts McHenry speaks on behalf of the president, who says he is pleased by the Indians' inclinations toward peace. Notes he is sending Silas Dinsmoor, an Indian agent, to live among them. Says that the prosecution of white killers of Indians will be undertaken, though the Indians should take care to avoid such occurrences of violence. States that if Indians steal from whites, the value of the stolen...
December 22, 1796 Speech by John Watts, Cherokee Chief, Concerning Peace & Boundaries with U.S. John Watts [not available] Notes that peace has faithfully been observed since a 1795 conference, though whites have killed Indians since then; expresses sorrow that these whites have not been punished. Describes the Indian-land boundary established Governor Blount [of TN], says he will abide only by that line. Asks that the boundary be formally run, by a U.S. surveyor of integrity (not a land speculator), and that...