Viewing 1–25 of 7,517 documents: "Hodgdon family"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
August 23, 1798 Exposing Your Family to the Contagion John Caldwell Samuel Hodgdon Caldwell expresses his concern regarding Hodgdon's family relative to the spread of yellow fever in Philadelphia. He argues that keeping his family in the city increases everyone's exposure to the contagion.
October 23, 1796 My Respects to Your Family, Etc. Winthrop Sargent Samuel Hodgdon Sargent pays his respects to Hodgdon's family. He has only just arrived in Cincinnati. He mentions a book or other publication by a McKerrie who has traveled very far north.
August 23, 1797 Inclusion of Marquee with Waggon John Stagg Samuel Hodgdon Orders to deliver tent to McHenry; men moving family out of Philadelphia.
October 29, 1791 Family in Distress Richard Clarke Samuel Hodgdon Since his family is likely to be distressed, Clarke has nobody else to turn to but Hodgdon. Clarke lives in the little hut near the slaughterhouse and had even made improvements to it. His wife has informed him that Mr. Hunt wants to turn her out so he asks Hodgdon to intercede on her behalf until he returns.
March 4, 1796 Request to Samuel Hodgdon from S. Beates for assistance for self & family Sarah Beates Samuel Hodgdon Beates apologizes for troubling Hodgdon. Would have waited on him, but she is unacquainted with Hodgdon. Needs to obtain substance for self and family; does not want to take any measures without his approbation. Refers to taking advice from Mr Davis. Notes in postscript that she has not heard of the author of her difficulties since she had the pleasure of seeing Hodgdon.
March 12, 1788 Family letter Polly Hodgdon Samuel Hodgdon Family letter from Polly Hodgdon to her father Samuel, the Commissioner of Commissary Stores. Wishes Hodgdon would write more often
July 3, 1800 Moving My Family As Soon As Possible Peter Hagner Samuel Hodgdon Hagner announces that when he arrives in Philadelphia he intends to remove his family from that city. He has written to the purveyor, Mr. Whelen, and asked him to provide transportation for his furniture. Since he has taken a house in Georgetown and is paying rent, he is anxious to remove his family and effects as early as possible.
July 22, 1798 No Fixed Business and A Family of Five Children Alexander Power Samuel Hodgdon Power admits to being much distressed at having no fixed business and a family of five children to support. He asks Hodgdon to find employment for him, preferably in the back country where he is most comfortable. He will report to Philadelphia as soon as Hodgdon summons him there.
September 23, 1799 Unfortunate Incident in My Brother's Family, Etc. William Miller Samuel Hodgdon Miller reports that an unfortunate incident in his brother James's family at Germantown has required his residence for the previous ten days. The enclosed warrant, with the Treasurer's endorsement, is being remitted and entitles Hodgdon to payment at the bank.
May 3, 1800 Passing Through the Small Pox, Etc. Constant Freeman Samuel Hodgdon Freeman has received the General Orders relative to the clothing. He hopes that Hodgdon's children have passed through the smallpox safely. Freeman's child is not yet born. Freeman and his family are in good health.
August 30, 1793 Letters; State of the Tumbrels; Yellow Fever Epidemic and Hodgdon's family Isaac Craig Samuel Hodgdon Received letters and newspapers for Quarter Master General. Tumbrells [carts] delivered by William Quigley. Received cartouche boxes, shoes. The tumbrells were overloaded and damaged. Had gears made. Expresses concern for the distress of family and hopes for its terminating in the reestablishment of Hodgdon and his family's health.
April 3, 1799 Sundries Purchased for McPherson's Family [not available] Michael Gunkle McPherson submits an account listing sums spent on sundry articles for his family on the expedition to Northampton.
January 15, 1799 Satisfactory Compensation for Samuel Hodgdon Samuel Hodgdon James McHenry Hodgdon discusses at length his own compensation. He argues that what the government has allowed for his salary will not be sufficient to maintain his family not to mention the fact that his commercial business suffers due to the time consumed by his public service.
October 20, 1792 Regarding Accounts Samuel Hodgdon Isaac Craig Was glad that money forwarded was safely at hand. Discusses Mr. Read. Asks to deliver enclosed letters and sends respects to Mrs. Craig and family.
October 3, 1796 Enclosed Accounts Caleb Gibbs William Simmons Gibbs encloses his accounts for the last quarter. He asks for the money as soon as possible, as he has a family to support.
October 25, 1794 A House for Mr. Ames & His Family John Bryant Samuel Hodgdon Bryant informs Hodgdon that he can do nothing about repairing a house for the use of Mr. Ames, the Superintendent of the Armourers at Springfield, until he receives orders from him. The house previously intended for Bryant's use was never properly prepared but perhaps it could be prepared for the use of Mr. Ames and his family.
March 17, 1792 Enclosed Letter for Colesworthy William Knox Isaac Craig Enclosed letter to Colesworthy, clerk to Hodgdon. Urgency in getting letter to him immediately. Hodgdon's family and General Knox are anxious to hear from him. Pressing matters of signing contractors and getting supplies to Quartermaster.
May 4, 1799 Letter of Thanks and Offer of Hospitality James Wilkinson Peter Walker Wilkinson thanks Walker for offering his help when Wilkinson moved his family to Concord; asks Walker to accept his family's hospitality there.
September 14, 1798 Sickness in Philadeliphia Samuel Hodgdon Isaac Craig Hodgdon bemoaned loss of neighbors in the city (Philadelphia) who left due to illness prevailing during summer months. Celebrates that his family is still well. Hodgdon chose to remain in the city to attend to his office. Noted that box containing sundry articles for Col. Sergeant and other valuable items for Gen. Wilkinson are traveling for Pittsburgh.
April 2, 1799 List of Articles for the Generals Family. Unknown Author [not available] List of articles put in the wagon on April 2nd for General McPherson's family.
August 31, 1793 Indian Depredations. William Blount [not available] The author describes the murder by Indians of Samuel Miller, the widow Baker and all but two of her children, and the family of Robert Wells.
September 19, 1793 Repacking the clothing; progress of shipments Isaac Craig Samuel Hodgdon Repacking is a dreadful piece of business and based on what has already been opened, it is altogether unnecessary. Neither the China nor the sugar have come to hand but it appears that Carson, the wagoner, left his load at Harrisburg. A part of the sub legion is still on the way. Some wagoner should be punished as an example for others.
August 4, 1798 I Will Gladly Serve James DeHaert Alexander Hamilton Not having a family, DeHaert expresses his readiness to serve in the Army, preferably as an officer, and asks Hamilton for a recommendation.
June 4, 1800 Revolutions in the Departments of Government, Etc. Constant Freeman Samuel Hodgdon Freeman discusses how to handle returns involving soldiers found unfit for service and how to find suitable housing for him and his family in the new city of Washington.
April 5, 1799 My Brother is Afflicted with Rheumatism, Etc. Ann Young Samuel Hodgdon Shortly after arriving in Baltimore, Mrs. Young's brother took a front store in the spirit and grocery line though unfortunately, he has been afflicted by rheumatism. Her sister got married to a decent young man and is now in her own house. Baltimore being a friendly large town still falls short of Philadelphia and she misses her many acquaintances in that city.