Viewing 76–100 of 141 documents: "Delawares"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
December 4, 1794 Fair and Equitable Terms of Peace [not available] Anthony Wayne Following the defeat of the northern tribes at the Battle of Fallen Timbers, General Wayne proposes terms for a lasting peace that will serve the interests of both red and white people.
February 14, 1793 Meeting with Friendly Tribes at Vincennes Rufus Putnam Henry Knox Putnam descirbes his meeting with friendly tribes at Vincennes where the Indians were given clothing, blankets, and ornaments to confirm the friendship of the American government.
February 21, 1793 Knox's Letter to the Western Indians Henry Knox Sachems, Chiefs, & Warriors of the Wyandots, Delawares, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatomies, Shawnees, & Miamis Knox says he has heard the voices of the Sachems, Chiefs, and Warriors and received their messages through the Six Nations. The President of the United States embraces their proposal and will send Commissioners to treat with them. The United States will endeavor to supply provisions during the Treaty. He warns that it will be in vain to expect peace if the depredations continue. (Given by order...
June 5, 1792 Speech to various Indian tribes Rufus Putnam Chiefs and Warriors of the Indian Nations Speech of Brigadieer General Rufus Putnam to the sachems and warriors of the Indian tribes inhabiting the Miami or Tawa and Wabash rivers. This included the Wyandots, Delawares, Chipawas, Ottawas, Pottawatamies, Shawanees, and Tweehtwees. Putnam addresses the sources of hostilities between the tribes and the United States. Requests that they open the path that leads to Fort Jefferson, the nearest...
May 8, 1792 Instructions to Capt. Hendrick Aupaumut Henry Knox Captain Hendrick Aupaumut The Secretary at War dispatches Captain Aupaumut, Chief of the Stockbridge Indians, to the Great Council of Indians at Lake Erie. Aupaumut is instructed to convey to the Indians that the desire for peace, on the part of the United States, is rooted in a concern for humanity, not fear. At the end of the document, Aupaumut signs a receipt for silver ear and nose jewels to be distributed to the...
June 22, 1792 Peace Overtures and Spies Henry Knox Anthony Wayne It appears that most of the northern Indians are willing to discuss peace overtures although several American officers were captured and killed because their Indian captors thought they were spies.
December 8, 1796 Speech at Conference with Indian Chiefs, Treaty Cannot Be Amended James McHenry [not available] McHenry's speech to the assembled chiefs, on behalf of the president. Tribes represented: Wiandots [Wyandots], Delawares, Shawanees [Shawnees], Ottawas, Chippewas, Putawatimies, Miamis, Eel River, Weeas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias. States that the president has considered the Indians' requests that some land sold in the treaty be remitted to them, as well as a formal marking of the...
January 14, 1794 Speech To the Chiefs and Warriors of the Delawares, Shawanese & Miami Nations or tribes of Indians & to all others whom it may Concern. Anthony Wayne [not available] Message delivered from Steven Young, George White Eyes, and another warrior as interpreter by Robert Wilson received by George Washington and member of the Council of Congress. Stated that if the Nations desire peace they will release all American prisoners to officers at Fort Recovery. United States offered protection to Indians in return for prisoners and a stop to all raids and murders by...
August 24, 1793 A Just Account of Our Transactions Commissioners for Indian Affairs in the Northern Department [not available] "The foregoing pages contain a just account of our transactions in attempting to negotiate a peace with the Western Indians, now in hostility against the United States."
August 7, 1792 War and Peace with Indians, Putnam's Plan for War Henry Knox Anthony Wayne War and peace with hostile and peaceful Indian nations discussed, Knox enclosed Brigadier General Putnam plan for war and his objections to commencing war in present year. Navigation report by late Major Hearts enclosed.
July 10, 1791 Notes on the Speeches of Good Peter and Red Jacket A. Bolt Red Jacket Bolt describes in his notes the speeches of Red Jacket and Good Peter and discusses the progress of civilizing the Indians.He talks of the hostility of the Western Indians and mentions Indians and Indian warfare. He alludes to prisoners of war and land sales.
February 22, 1795 Proclamation to the Indians Anthony Wayne [not available] Document, Proclamation to the Indians, Greeneville.
June 5, 1792 The State of Indian Talks; Threat of Attack Rufus Putnam Henry Knox Putnam informs Knox of the state of the negotiations between the US and some of the northern tribes and warns that any attack by the US on Indian towns would severely hinder the talks and endanger all US citizens in the vicinity of the attack.
November 29, 1796 Washington's Speech to the Indians on How to Honor the Treaty of Greeneville George Washington Northwestern Indian Chiefs Address to the [Northwest] Indian Confederacy comprised of the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawnee, Kickapoo, Wea, Ottawa, Chippewa, Putawatomie, Miami, Kaskaskia, Piankeshaw & Eel River tribes. Endeavors to give them advice surrounding the [Treaty of Greeneville], now ratified by the Senate. Explains the provision that the Indians not sell any of their land except to the U.S. Recommends that the Indians...
June 23, 1791 Protect Indian Allies from Injury, Etc. Henry Knox Major General Richard Butler It appears that the preparations for the expedition are going well with troops moving forward and recruiting in New England taking spring. Additional clothing and shoes will be forwarded. It appears that the Six Nations will provide sixty warriors for the expedition but care must be taken that none are injured by American citizens which will convert these Indians from friends to enemies.
July 17, 1792 Indian Affairs in the Northwest & Prospects for Peace General Israel Chapin Henry Knox Chapin discusses Indian affairs in the northwest and the prospects for peace with sundry tribes.
December 8, 1796 Treaty of Greeneville Cannot Be Amended; Regarding Gifts & White Presences on Indian Land James McHenry Northwestern Indian Chiefs Addressed to the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Poutawatomies, Miamis, Eel River, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankashaws and Kaskaskias. Transmits the president's response to some Indians' request that slightly different land concessions and boundaries be agreed upon, to the effect that the conditions of the Treaty of Greeneville cannot be changed now that it has been ratified by the...
August 13, 1793 Indian Council at rapids of Miami River response to Federal Commissioners' speech of 31 July Chiefs and Warriors Council of Indian Nations at Rapids of Miami River Federal Commissioners Treaty at Sandusky From the Indian Council at the foot of the rapids of Miami, written 13 August, delivered by two Wyandot runners, arrived to Commissioners 16 Aug. This is reply to the Federal Commissioner's Speech of 31 July 1793. Reason for delay was need to conduct multiple interpretations to Nations and the need to answer fully. Refer to treaties held at Fort Stanwix, Fort McIntosh and Miami and...
June 5, 1792 We Shall Unite in Friendship & Love Rufus Putnam Tribes on the Miami, Tawa, & Wabash Rivers This is a copy of a speech by General Rufus Putnam to the tribes of the Miami, Tawa, and Wabash Rivers in which he assures the Indians of the peaceful intentions of the President and Congress and his plans to meet with the tribal headmen soon to resolve any differences between them and the United States.
January 15, 1785 Report from Lieutenant Colonel Josiah Harmar to Jonathan Dickinson on status of troops, equipment and fort, and relations with Indians Josiah Harmar President John Dickinson Lt.Col Josiah Harmar reports to President John Dickinson on his utilization of Pennsylvania Troops at Fort McIntosh as well as the Indian reaction to the recently commenced United States treaty with Great Britain. Reports that Indians look to lands as their own, whereas Commissioners state that, having adhered to the King of Britain during Revolutionary War, Indians are a conquered people.
May 22, 1792 Instructions to Brig. Gen. Rufus Putnam Henry Knox Rufus Putnam The Secretary at War instructs General Rufus Putnam as follows: "Your first great object upon meeting the Indians will be to convince them that the United States requires none of their lands." Knox authorizes Putnam to allow the Indians to keep U.S. Army officers as hostages in order to secure the agreement of the Chiefs to travel to Philadelphia.
November 29, 1796 Conference with the Several Indian Chiefs Assembled, & Washington's Reply George Washington [not available] Various Indian chiefs speak on rights to land, inclinations to peace over war, and a recent treaty. Tribes represented: Wiandots [Wyandots], Delawares, Shawanees [Shawnees], Ottawas, Chippewas, Putawatimies, Miamis, Eel River, Weeas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias. George Washington's response to these follows, which discusses points of the treaty, such as that the Indians are to...
March 19, 1791 Instructions to the Secretary of War George Washington Henry Knox Prior to his trip through the southern states, President Washington relays to Knox instructions regarding proposed operations in the territories northwest and south of the Ohio River, and approves of Knox's prior proposals.
July 27, 1793 Speech from the Confederate Indians at Miami Rapids General Council of Indians Commissioners Speech of the Confederate Indians at the Miami Rapids to the U.S. Commissioners of Indian Affairs, where they ask if the United States government will honor the boundary set forth in the Treaty of Fort Stanwick, the Ohio River.
May 7, 1795 Deceit of Creek Indians Discussed John Foster Williams Anthony Wayne Williams believed war would continue due to the encouragement of the Creek Indians by the British to make war against United States. Warriors take war path by Wayandol and Delaware towns with hopes they will strike and give the warriors a right to commence hostilities. Danger to women and children discussed. Request for hasty assistance.