Viewing 1–25 of 60 documents: "Cussetahs"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 28, 1797 Happy Accommodation of All Past Differences Among the Four Nations Chief Cussetah King [not available] Speech of the Cussetahs and lower towns to the Chickasaws in reply to an address.
1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard [Bernard] to Henry Gaither Major Commandant on the state of affairs on the frontier, the prospects for peace, and whether military operations will make distinctions between Creek friend and foe Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither Undated letter, presumably written spring or summer 1793. Barnard discusses the danger of traveling, presumably in the aftermath of the robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys. Matters may have to be settled by an army coming against the offenders. Does not see war as general yet. Hopes that distinctions can be made by army between hostile and peaceful towns. Cussetahs want peace. Mad Dog of...
June 14, 1787 Speech of the Lower Creek chiefs the Hallowing King of the Cowetas and Fat King of Cussetahs. [not available] [not available] Beloved man from Congress was here. Mr McGillivray came over here and matters were settled. Expected that Mr. White would inform the State of Georgia. You always promised that the innocent should not suffer for the guilty. We knew nothing of these bad people or the mischief of the upper towns. Had a meeting with northern Indians lately. Told them we had settled matters with Virginians and could...
October 1, 1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard [Barnard] from Oakmulgee on peace efforts with Creek Nation Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove Timothy Bernard [Barnard] reporting from Oakmulgee, addressed to James Seagrove, Creek Indian Agent, at Ft Fidius on Oconee. Has sent written correspondence to Warrior King of Cussetahs and spoke with White Lieutenant of Oakfuskees. Has asked White Lieutenant to gather heads of lower towns to explain matters on frontier of Georgia. Reports that Cowetas stole horses and shot at whites and killed...
April 20, 1793 Report from James Holmes to Creek Indian Agent James Seagrove on aftermath of robbery and murder at Trader Hill St Marys James Holmes James Seagrove Reports that the county is in as a convulsed a state as possible. Majority of Head Men want peace and are willing to satisfy James Seagrove's demands. Was advised not to proceed further than Cussetah because some Indians intend to do mischief on the Oconnee. Scalps brought in; Cussetahs making examples of those who did mischief at Traders Hill. Believes that Galphin and Upton will be turned over....
February 20, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to David Cornell on his bad actions owing to the wicked advice of white me James Seagrove David Cornell From St Mary's, Seagrove says that David Cornell's actions [bringing a scalp from Cumberland at behest of Spanish Agent] are indeed bad, but are the fault of the wicked white men [Spanish Agents]. Seagrove expresses great regard for Cornell's father. Advises him to take the advice of his cousin Alexander. Will see Cornell when he visits the Cussetahs on 1 May 1793.
January 1, 1794 Indians attacked by whites Constant Freeman Governor Edward Telfair Informs the Governor of Georgia of an unfortunate event harming the state's relationship with the Creek Indians. On December 28th the White Bird-tail king and eight Cussetahs, encouraged by assurances of safety from Mr. Seagrove, were hunting when two of them were treacherously murdered by a party of whites. Three white men had appeared to the Indians without arms. The Indians received and...
July 21, 1793 A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckaubatchees, given out in the Cussetah Square, at a meeting of a number of Lower Creeks, this 21st July, 1793-to be forwarded to his Excellency General Washington, President of the United States. [not available] [not available] Translated by Timothy Bernard at Cussetahs. A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckabatchee, to be forwarded to His Excellency General Washington, President of United States. Heads of Creek Nation report that Chickasaw Nation holding talks with Governor Blount, Southwest Territorial Governor, and report on the dispatch of several thousand men to...
July 21, 1793 A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckabatchees to be forwarded to His Excellency General George Washington, President of United States Timothy Barnard [Bernard] [not available] Translated by Timothy Bernard at Cussetahs. A talk from the heads of the Upper and Lower Creeks, by order of the Mad Dog, of the Tuckabatchee, to be forwarded to His Excellency General Washington, President of United States. Heads of Creek Nation report that Chickasaw Nation holding talks with Governor Blount, Southwest Territorial Governor, and report on the dispatch of several thousand men to...
May 16, 1793 Aftermath of Incident at Traders Hill St Mary's Creek Chiefs [not available] Cussetahs pledge continued friendship. Because so many whites have been killed, do not see that they can influence matters any longer. Ask that the U.S. give a drubbing and burning to the perpetrators listed as Cowetas, Broken Arrow, Uchees, Usichees, Tallasse. Chiefs ask that Cussetah town and people be spared. Proceeded to give directions on how best to go after the Cowetas, while sparing...
August 23, 1792 Murder of Young Man by Indians Multiple Authors James Seagrove [A talk From the Kings, chiefs, warriors, and head-men of the Cussetahs and Cowetas, to James Seagrove.] Noted murder of young man by Indians, Cussetahs and Cowetahs did not know the identity of the murderer(s). Asked for patience in finding offending Indian as hunting season is soon. Signs of good faith issued.
June 11, 1793 Georgia Militia Not Discriminating between Creek Friends and Foes Henry Gaither Henry Knox Gaither reports that [contrary to guidance from Federal authorities] Georgia militia General Twiggs does not intend to discriminate between Creek friend and foe, with the exception of Cussetahs. Gaither surmises that this will do mischief to United States strategic intentions. Reports that many militia are in open rebellion against federal government since 1 November 1792, violating the [Treaty...
March 22, 1793 A talk delivered by Timothy Bernard to the Indians assembled at the Cussetahs and interpreted by himself Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Indians assembled at Cussetah Timothy Bernard, Indian interpreter gives an address to Indians assembled at Cussetahs at Kinnards Cowpen. Bernard says he has lived many years in this land and took the job as interpreter to serve the county where he has resided most of his life. Warns against the bad talks that will be the ruin of the Creek Nation. These bad talks come from the white people and the Shawnee. Some of the whites...
June 10, 1793 Orders to go about the heart of country to visit the Creek leadership Henry Knox James Seagrove Secretary of War Knox conveys orders from President of United States General George Washington to Creek Indian Agent James Seagrove to go into the heart of the country. Capitalize on friendship of White Lieutenant, Mad Dog of Upper Creeks and White Bird, King of the Cussetahs. Purpose should be to demonstrate peaceful intentions of United States and to emphasize the existence of Creek Nation...
May 27, 1793 Failure to meet demands in aftermath of robbery and murder at Traders Hill, St Marys James Seagrove [not available] Seagrove expresses disappointment that the friendly leadership of the Creeks has not been able to hand over the culprits involved in the murder and robbery at Traders Hill at St Marys. Warns them that to make enemies with United States spells ruin for Creek Nation. Creeks cannot expect mercy when acting such as this. Seagrove is heartened by the good conduct of so many Creeks; such towns will...
June 21, 1793 Headmen Want Peace with the United States, Etc. Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither Barnard reports that headmen of Cussetahs, and headmen of upper and lower Creeks all seem to want peace with United States. Their intent was to make satisfaction for the murders and robbery at Robert Seagrove's store at Trader's Hill on St Marys River, but for the intervention of William Panton. At Tuckabatches, Indians agreed to return stolen horses; Cowetas and Chickasaws refuse to comply....
June 20, 1793 Report on Events in Aftermath of Robbery & Murder at Traders Hill St. Marys Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove From Flint River Georgia, Bernard report to Seagrove that he has been to Cussetah Towns with David Cornell, head warrior of Tuchabachees. Conclusion was to give satisfaction for robbery and murders at Traders Hill. Men were sent by Cussetahs to kill the perpetrators. Daniel Dourouzeaux, villain who turned Spaniard, at behest of Panton, interfered with the business. Nevertheless, both upper and...
May 10, 1794 Indian relations in Georgia Captain Richard B. Roberts Henry Knox Offers intelligence to the Secretary of War regarding Indian relations in Georgia.
June 23, 1793 Commitment to Peace with the United States Chief White Lieutenant James Seagrove Dispatch from White Lieutenant or Tuskena Atca, for himself and the Upper Creek Towns, to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, interpreted and delivered by Stephen Sullivan. White Lieutenant pledges his commitment to peace with United States and will comply with demands to turn over the perpetrators of robbery and murder at Traders Hill St Marys. Asks for patience and understanding. Reminds...
October 18, 1793 Letter from Timothy Barnard [Bernard] to James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, reporting on favorable prospects for peace Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove Barnard [Bernard] remains ill and can hardly collect his sentiments on paper. Reports that the Warrior King of the Cussetahs returned from meeting with upper Creeks; all towns in that quarter want peace. To demonstrate sincerity, White Lieutenant and other leaders will join Warrior King to Oakmulges to conduct Seagrove into the nation. White Lieutenant asks Seagrove to bring the women and...
April 30, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to Henry Knox Secretary at War regards aftermath of robber and murder at Traders Hill on St Marys James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove reports that he has received notification that Chiefs of Creek Nation will comply with demands to hand over the perpetrators and hostages. Seagrove is embarrassed by the lack of a secure jail facility; and Fort St. Tammany [on the St. Mary river] is no more secure. Previous Indian captives have escaped. Reports that interpreter Mr. Bryant has returned from a visit with the Simonolas...
July 29, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Indian Agent, to Kings, Chiefs, of the Cussetah and all other friends of United States in the Lower Creek Towns James Seagrove Chiefs of the Cussetahs From Savannah, James Seagrove addresses the Kings and Chiefs of the Cussetahs and all other friends of United States in lower Creek Towns. Some of those Indians detained at Seagrove's house have since run away. Expresses disappointment that they left. They were well taken care of. The remaining detainees Seagrove sends via Mordecai and Townsend as a demonstration of good faith. Speaks of death...
December 18, 1794 Letter from deputy agent of Indian affairs Timothy Barnard [Bernard] James Seagrove Extract of a letter from Timothy Barnard, deputy agent of Indian affairs to James Seagrove, Indian agent to the Creeks in the Southern Department.
October 15, 1792 Meeting with Cowetahs and Cussetahs James Durouzeaux James Seagrove Cowetah and Cussetah will meet with Seagrove, requested provisions at meeting place. Durouzeaux cannot convey McGillivray's letter personally as his horse died.
October 15, 1792 Problems with Cussetahs John Galphin James Seagrove Intelligence that some "busy person" is trying to stop the Cussetah Indians from visiting Seagrove. Galphin exerting every effort to stop such proceedings. Indians sent to Providence displeased with Lord Dunmore's treatment of them; they did not receive any presents. Galphin to return as soon as possible.