Viewing 1–25 of 1,924 documents: "Creek Territory"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
October 5, 1792 Negotiations with the Creek Nation James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Favorable conclusion to negotiations with Creek Nation. Enclosed talks of three chiefs which show present disposition of Nation. Discussed possible punishment of person killed by Indian chief near Carr's Bluff, on the Oconee.
June 16, 1795 Peace with Creek Nation James Seagrove Timothy Pickering Announced he was leaving for frontier with Creek Chiefs after confirming peace with the Creek Nation and the U.S.
November 28, 1794 Hostile Creek Indians William Blount Henry Knox Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory writes that the Creek Indians "continue to murder" American citizens, "in their houses and fields." Blount believes that the Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Cherokees will readily aid the United States against the Creeks. Blount concludes by writing, "the friendly Cherokees serve as a guard against the hostile Creeks."
February 13, 1799 COPY: Unauthorized Military Actions Constant Freeman William Simmons E. Telfair, governor of Georgia, used militia troops and materials for unauthorized offensive expedition into Creek Country on the pretext that he was protecting Georgia's frontier.
June 22, 1795 Disputes Among Indians Timothy Pickering William Blount Enclosed copies of Creek talks submitted to Pickering. Disputes between tribes discussed.
October 21, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove Creek Indian Agent, to Henry Knox Secretary of War, reporting on renewed prospects for peace with Creek Nation James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove reports on positive prospects for peace, which might continue if the Georgia militia would stop going into Creek territory. Relates with pretty great certainty that about 200 militia have crossed the Oconee from Carr's Bluff, under command of Colonel Alexander. Notes that he has written to Georgia Governor Telfair on the matter. Expresses favorable opinion regarding a planned meeting of...
September 11, 1795 Proposed Peace b/w Creek and Chickasaw Nations Timothy Pickering George Washington Southwestern Territory is at peace according to letter from Gov. Blount. Notification that Gen. Robertson will go to Chickasaw Nation and notify them of Creeks intention of peace and request for prisoner exchange. Gov. Blount will meet with the Creeks at the Tellico Blockhouse.
April 2, 1791 Excerpts of Treaties Establishing the Western Border with the Creek and Cherokee Indians. Henry Knox [not available] Knox's letter establishes that the western boundary of the United States, where it comes into contact with the territory of the Creek and Cherokee Indians, has been firmly established by several treaties the tribes have signed with Georgia and South Carolina. The letter contains excerpts from several of the various treaties to illustrate where boundary lines were considered to have been drawn in...
March 10, 1794 Expenses on Indian treaties and presents Henry Knox Unknown Recipient A statement of the gross sum of money which was expended by the United States in making the Creek treaty of New York, in August 1790. Includes presents which have been made to the Creek and Cherokee Indians since the said treaty, along with annual allowances. Expenses of the Creek treaty add up to $20,583. The presents made since the treaty add up to $22,279 for the Creeks and $18,217 to the...
September 6, 1794 Creek Nation and Georgia Governor Edmund Randolph Alexander Hamilton The Secretary of State encloses papers received from James Seagrove, United States agent to the Creeks, regarding the Creek nation and the Governor of Georgia, George Mathews. On the Georgian frontier, Americans have illegally invaded Creek territory, much to the distress of President Washington.
January 26, 1790 Indian Attacks Arthur St. Clair Henry Knox By note received from Louisville, details of Indian attacks of settlements located on Russell Creek, and Danville.
August 29, 1796 Dragoons, Troop Movements, Creek Hostility Anthony Wayne James McHenry In a largely illegible letter, Wayne seems to be reporting on the state of the military deployment in the southwest that is a response to the hostile actions of the Creek Indians. Also addresses the time and difficulty of transporting large numbers of troops across the frontier.
1799 Sketch of the Creek Country in 1798 and 1799 Benjamin Hawkins [not available] History of Creek, or Muscogee, Nation written in detail. Includes in depth description of type of land and resources available.
October 7, 1792 Peace with the Creek Nation James Seagrove John Kinnard Seagrove ommends Kinnard for his allegiance and assistance with peace between U.S. and the Creek Nation. He mentions the confusion in the Indian Nation, stolen property, and Indian mischief. He requests that Kinnard forward the invitation to peace talks with U.S. representative to all lower Indian towns, especially those that were deceived by Bowles.
July 1, 1796 Negotiations Over Murder of Creeks Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry Enclosed copy of treaty with Creek Nation. Indians are not satisfied with governments reaction to Creek murders by Georgia residents (Harrison and others), discussed punishments. Current sentiments of citizens believe the boundary should be maintained by Federal government and not the state. Boundary line with Spanish territory determined.
October 1, 1794 Army of Creek Indians John Easten General James Robertson Transmits to General Robertson a copy of a letter from Doctor R.J. Waters relative to an army of Creeks coming against the Southwest Territory.
April 22, 1795 [A talk from the Mad Dog and Big Warrior of the Tuckabatcet in behalf of the Creek Nation to James Seagrove] Mad Dog James Seagrove Advice from U.S. on peace between tribes to save land was good. Noted killing of Creek hunters by Chickasaws, Creeks will transport prisoners and property of guilty Indians to U.S. Fear that some Indians will ally with Cumberland settlers and militia against Chickasaws. Creek request that the U.S. remains peaceful, Creeks promise to remain peaceful with Cherokee Nation. Hopes to establish...
October 20, 1794 Letter to the Governor of Southwest Territory Double-head William Blount Letter from Double Head of an Indian tribe in Tennessee, to Governor William Blount of the Southwest Territory. These particular Indians have friendly relations with the United States and insult the Creek Indians in the letter. Double Head writes that his people are desirous of hunting, but fear whites on the frontier who may harm them.
May 20, 1791 COPY: Proceedings of Council with Chiefs of the Six Nations John Butler Chiefs Six Nations Formal speech by Butler given at the negotiations held at Buffalo Creek.
August 5, 1793 Methods for Postponing a Creek War Henry Knox William Blount "Can there be any practicable modes suggested which would probably postpone a Creek War? If so will you have the goodness to point out such as you may think most effectual for that purpose."
May 3, 1798 Official Statement on the Ceeded Land given to the Creek Indian Nation Multiple Authors House of Representatives Report from Pinckney on the land given to the Creek Indian Nation in treaty held at Shoulderbone and treaty in New York between Creeks and the United States. Compensation is owed the State of Georgia for the ceded land.
October 14, 1793 Letter from James Seagrove to Georgia Governor Telfair requesting support in allowing Oakfuskees to settle matters with Cowetas for injuries done, to stop expeditions into Creek country, to prohibit future expeditions unless authorized by law James Seagrove Governor Edward Telfair Seagrove asks that the people of Georgia not interfere with Oakfuskee efforts to gains satisfaction for injuries done by Cowetas. Also requests he call off parties of militia assembled in Green and Washington Counties. Asks that Governor issue proclamation forbidding expeditions into Creek territory without proper [federal] authority.
November 26, 1795 Master of Trade House to Serve the Creek Indians of Georgia Timothy Pickering Edward Price Secretary Pickering appoints Edward Price as the factor of a trading house on the St. Mary's River, GA, which has been established by Congress to supply the Creek Indians with goods. Sets forth instructions on the running of the post, covering pricing, the objective of maintaining friendship with the Indians, medium of exchange (money or peltries [pelts] only), whom to contact in the Georgia...
August 11, 1792 Creek Relations Henry Knox James Seagrove Suspicions of McGillivray's integrity confirmed. Noted his role in influencing Creek sentiments toward U.S. government. Approaches on how to cajole him to satisfy U.S. governments needs relative to relations with Creek Nation. Mentioned Spanish officer's effort to impede laying boundary line agreeable to treaty. Hostilities b/w U.S. and Indians anticipated to ensue until Indians are driven...
April 30, 1791 COPY: Letter of Condolence Regarding Murder at Beaver Creek Arthur St. Clair Delaware Chiefs Assurances of punishment for the murder of Indians by white people, reprimands other bad Indians for "mischief".