Viewing 1–25 of 12,507 documents: "Commissioners for Indian Affairs in the Southern Department"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
March 27, 1787 Regarding Indian Affairs in the Southern Department Charles Thomson Henry Knox Thomson refers to a report from Joseph Martin, superintendent of Indian Affairs in the Southern Department, who reported great unrest among the Cherokees over the rapid encroachment of their lands by whites from the "state of Franklin." Suggests that Cherokees receiving encouragement from Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks and Spanish.
September 21, 1789 Readiness to make further communications Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray So that there will be no complaints of partial or defective representation, commissioners will be ready to make further communications as soon as the third member of the commission, the honorable Mr. Griffin, arrives.
September 23, 1789 Regarding request to receive talks on west side of Oconee River Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray Commissioners agree to receive talks on the west side of Oconee River.
September 26, 1789 Talk of the Commissioners plenipotentiary in reply to the talk of White Bird King Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] Commissioners express disappointment that Alexander McGillivray has left camp. They point out their propositions for peace and friendship. If the terms were not agreeable, they ask, why was that not communicated? Close by asking the headmen to persuade McGillivray to come back and meet with the commissioners.
May 23, 1789 A Talk from the Head-men and Chiefs of the Lower Creek Nation to the Commissioners of the United States, of Indian Affairs in the Southern Department. Headmen and Warriors of Lower Creeks [not available] Received talk from Mr. George Galphin. Cannot provide answer because of separate talks with Alexander McGillivray. Lament that some have "gone out" [to commit violence] and say they cannot be accountable for this. Hope there will be no blood spilled.
May 22, 1790 Treaty Between Southern States and Indians, Goods Purchased by Commissioners Steele Henry Knox Refers to previous resolutions of the "old Congress" on Indian affairs and direction of Indian Commissioners and funds and the difficulties they faced seeking power between federal, state, and territory.
September 23, 1789 Arrival of Mr. Griffin and initiation of treaty talks Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray Commissioners inform that Mr. Griffin arrived and the three are preparing communications for the next day. General Lincoln and General Pickens will attend this forenoon at the black drink. Indians wish to receive talks on west side of Oconee River. Commissioners agree in order to take away all cause of jealousy.
September 24, 1789 Reply from Alexander McGillivray, Chief of Creek Nation Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department McGillivray acknowledges receipt of letter from Commissioners. Chiefs would like to meet morning of 24 September at the ceremony of black drink, after which they will proceed with business.
December 24, 1792 Letter Regarding Indian Affairs in the Southern Department Henry Knox President of the Senate of the United States "The President of the United States has directed me to submit to the Senate the copy of a letter from his Excellency the Governor of Georgia, dated Augusta, December 5th, 1791, with an enclosure relatively to Indian affairs in the southern department."
October 7, 1786 Appointment of Richard Butler as superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southern District Nathaniel Gorham [not available] Nomination of Richard Butler to superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southern District.
November 15, 1792 Indian Affairs in the Southern Department Henry Knox United States Senate Knox transmits to the Senate information from James Seagrove regarding Indian affairs in the southeast. .
October 26, 1787 Instructions to the Commissioners for negotiating with the tribes of Indians in the Southern Department. Congress of the United States Commissioners Congress reports to the commissioners of Indian Affairs that hostilities have commenced between the state of North Carolina and the Cherokee Nation, and the state of Georgia and the Creek Nation, with boundaries as the general source of contention. The commissioners are instructed to make peace without demanding the cession of any land from the Indians; the commissioners are also instructed to...
May 28, 1784 State of Indian Affairs in the Southern Department Committee on Indian Affairs [not available] The Committee on the State of Indian Affairs in the Southern Department is of the opinion that the Southern Indians should be prevailed upon to make such cessions of uncultivated land to the States they inhabit as may be convenient to those Nations and commensurate to the necessities of those States. Seeks prevention of foreign possession.
October 26, 1787 Instructions for appointing commissioners to Indian Affairs Congress of the United States [not available] The U.S. Congress authorizes the state governments of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia to appoint one commissioner each to work in conjunction with the superintendent of Indian Affairs in order to negotiate treaties between the United States and southern Indian tribes. Congress allots six thousand dollars for the program, which will fund a militia and pay each commissioner five dollars...
September 20, 1789 Regarding planned visit from Principal Chiefs and request for private meeting Alexander McGillivray Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department McGillivray informs of a visit from Principal Chiefs, accompanied by interpreter Derezeau. He asks for a private meeting with one or two of the commissioners.
September 24, 1789 Talk of the Commissioners to the Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors of the Creek Nation Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department [not available] Reference to calamities of late war with Great Britain; how the United States has recovered and obtained liberty and independence; that the United States is at peace and its numbers are increasing. The Union has grown to manhood and can speak with a louder voice and strike with a stronger arm. Refers to General Washington as the head man of all councils and chief of all warriors. Discusses the...
June 15, 1789 Report on Several Indian Tribes Henry Knox George Washington Knox informs the President that certain Indian Affairs require immediate attention. He also goes on to outline a proposed strategic policy with regard to Indian affairs. Indians are currently in state of unrest. This report pertains to the Wabash Indians in the Northwest. Knox informs the President that subsequent reporting will follow. Reports # 2, 3, and 4 will address the situation with the...
September 26, 1789 Talk of the White Bird King to US commissioners [not available] [not available] Pays compliments to the US Commissioners, but says the Creeks have been at the river for a long time and have become tired. Hunting time is coming soon. Hopes that the whites behave and do not steal the Creek's horses. Says that although nothing to be done about the treaty, hopes it may be done hereafter. Then the Cussetah King arose and lighted a pipe and presented it to the commissioners. The...
September 11, 1789 Report of proceedings of Federal Commissioners for restoring and establishing peace between United States and Indians south of Ohio River Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Henry Knox Federal Commissioners report that they sailed from New York on 31 August and arrived at Savannah on 10 September. They wrote letters to Governor of Georgia, George Walton, and Mr. Pickens and Mr. Osbourne, the commissioners then at Rock Landing.
March 17, 1793 The Ensuing Treaty James O'Hara Samuel Hodgdon O'Hara congratulates his country on the appointment of Commissioners of Indian Affairs for the ensuing treaty. Whatever can be done consistent with the honor and safety of the Union may be expected from the zeal and ability of these enlightened characters.
September 8, 1796 Provisions for Ellicot and Commissioners Business Samuel Hodgdon Isaac Craig Request to furnish Mr. Ellicot with tents. Discussed transportation by boat. Noted commissioners would run the southern line of the U.S.
September 1, 1789 Bauman acknowledges Knox's receipt of monies for stores Bauman [not available] Receipt for stores used by Indian Commissioners in treating with the southern Indians.
August 13, 1793 Letter Citation Chiefs and Warriors of the Indian Nations Commissioners for Indian Affairs in the Northern Department Cited in Commissioners to Chiefs and Warriors, 08/16/1793.
April 6, 1793 Commissisoners for Indian Affairs, Etc. James O'Hara Samuel Hodgdon O'Hara congratulates his country on the appointment of the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. He is convinced that all that can be done consistent with the health and safety of the Union may be expected from the zeal and abilities of those enlightened characters.
October 29, 1784 Articles for Indian commissioners E. Butler Samuel Hodgdon Discusses the completion of the order of articles for the Indian commissioners and forwarding the items to Fort Pitt.