Viewing 1–14 of 14 documents: "Chota"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
June 5, 1788 Indians Seeking Peace Prince of Notoly Andrew Pickens Chota Indians left their towns and land so the Creeks and White People can fight among themselves.
November 23, 1785 Preliminary Speeches by Cherokee Headmen at Treaty of Hopewell [not available] [not available] Tassel of Chota. Refers to red people as the original people of the the land. Presents beads as confirmation of friendship. Refers to encroachment by whites on indian land. Recalls past treaties, then introduces War Woman of Chota, who says she is fond of hearing of peace. The commissioners ask for the boundary lines and Tassel agrees to provide it the following day. Unsuckanail, of New Cusse...
May 19, 1789 Council at Chota concerning a treaty between the United States and the Cherokee nation Chiefs & Warriors of the Cherokee Nation [not available] Warriors, chiefs and representatives of Cherokee nation having met at Chota on Tennessee, are sorry to inform elder brother General Washington and the great council of the United States of the bad conduct of some; but to great joy the Great Spirit has removed the dark cloud and permits the sun to shine in friendship upon each party. Cherokees make known to Congress of a desire and intention to...
September 13, 1792 Notification of Divide in Cherokee Nation John Sevier William Blount Sevier invited to join council held in Cherokee nation in town of Chota. At council Sevier was notified that the five lower towns had declared war on United States, J. Watts heads party. Hostile Indians plan on attacking frontier settlements. Assurances that every other part of the Cherokee nation is happily at peace with United States. Special note on Indian town names and names of chiefs...
May 19, 1789 A great talk by Warriors and Chiefs of Cherokee nation assembled at Chota [not available] Tickagiska King Begins with an apology for misunderstandings and for the actions of their rash inconsiderate young men. Wish to live in peace with neighbors. Mentions Tennessee, Highwassee, Telliquo, and Ammoah. Makes mention of last treaty at South Carolina where they gave up to white brothers all the land they could spare; and have little left to raise women and children upon. Hope no more will be taken...
September 11, 1792 Declaration of War by Cherokees William Blount Henry Knox Just received declaration of war against United States by the five lower towns of the Cherokees. Regiment of Knox County ordered into service for the defense of white settlements. Declaration of war was unexpected, Cherokees claimed violation of treaty of Holstein.
December 10, 1789 Request for Intelligence from the Secretary at War, Concerning Indians & Indian-Fighting in Tennessee Henry Knox Arthur Campbell Discusses proposed plan of raising a regiment of 560 privates and non-commissioned officers at Holstein Valley, for 3 year's service against Indians. Lists several questions, most concerning relations with the Cherokee and Creek Indians, and the disposal of each to war or alliance with the U.S. Also asks about geography and river routes in Tennessee region, commenting on the "uncertainty of the...
September 26, 1792 Information by Governor Blount, respecting the Cherokee Chiefs whose names are mentioned in the narrative given by Richard Finnelson. William Blount [not available] Believed Panton caused J.Watts to go to Pensacola. Additional details about Indian allegiances and those that signed the Treaty of Holston.
April 9, 1793 Cherokee Representation to Philadelphia William Blount Henry Knox Blount believes that the Cherokee Nation would be willing to send a represenation to Philadelphia to confer with the President but they are hesitant to do so while it appears the Creeks are making war, with the aid of young Cherokee warriors, on the Cumberland settlements .
October 1792 An Abstract of Indian Affairs Shaw [not available] Shaw discusses affairs with the southern Indians and the machinations of the Spaniards to turn the Indians against the United States.
March 20, 1792 Protecting Citizens on the Frontier William Blount Henry Knox Governor William Blount provides Knox with information regarding the dispositions of the Southern Indians, and the causes of the hostilities of part of the Cherokees and Creeks and the steps he is taking to protect citizens on the frontier.
November 3, 1792 Information Given Governor Blount by James Carey James Carey William Blount Minutes of information given Governor Blount by James Carey, one of the interpreters of the United States, in the Cherokee Nation.
March 15, 1792 Creeks and Cherokees will Join in War David Craig William Blount David Craig reports, in considerable detail, to Governor William Blount on the state of Indian affairs on the southern frontiers. There have already been depredations and Craig believes that the Creeks and Cherokees will join the Shawnees and will commit many more acts of violence and may indeed engage in a general war against the whites in their territories.
November 8, 1792 Turmoil in the Southeast William Blount Henry Knox Governor Blount reports on the tumultuous state of Indian affairs in the southeast. He believes the Creeks and Cherokees cannot be controlled by their chiefs and therefore seem likely to go to war. The Chickasaws and Choctaws seem disposed toward peace.