Viewing 1–25 of 1,016 documents: "Bear's Creek"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
July 30, 1791 Establishment of a Post on Bear Creek Alexander McGillivray Henry Knox McGillivray warns that the establishment of a post on Bear Creek would antagonize the Indians since they would see it as the start of many ew settlements by the Georgia company.
January 28, 1800 Reports Indian Affairs; Tribute to Washington David Henley James McHenry Reports that late account of Creeks killing 2 Chickasaws is false. Seve Collbert half-breed, has come to purchase a boat in preparation to settle at Bear Creek. According to instructions, plans to purchase rifle for Son of Apoemingo. Encloses copy of Mr. Hawkins's letter, who returned saddles stolen by the Creeks and taken by Capt. Butler at Tellico. Reports about houses will come shortly....
August 1, 1793 Savages Against Savages William Blount Henry Knox Governor Blount and General Pickens discuss the implications of building a post at the mouth of the Bear Creek which may help to cut off water communication between the northern and southern Indians. They mention the benefits that may incur by enlisting the Chickasaws and Choctaws in the war against the Creeks who might be joined by the Cherokees.
November 28, 1794 Hostile Creek Indians William Blount Henry Knox Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory writes that the Creek Indians "continue to murder" American citizens, "in their houses and fields." Blount believes that the Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Cherokees will readily aid the United States against the Creeks. Blount concludes by writing, "the friendly Cherokees serve as a guard against the hostile Creeks."
January 5, 1789 Captain McLane accounts Joseph Howell Captain Allen McLane Encloses statement of McLane's account. Asks about the status of two Bear Skins; whether they were appropriated to private or public use.
December 9, 1797 Sales of Furs and Skins by James Seagrove William Simmons Unknown Recipient Sales of furs and skins by James Seagrove, Superintendent of Indians Affairs to the Creek Nation, being on account of the United States the same having been received in pay for goods furnished to Indians and factors from the public goods in his possession at a time when they could not purchase Indians goods in Georgia.
August 7, 1790 [Affidavit] Alexander McGillivray [not available] Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America.
August 11, 1792 Proceedings of Governor Blount and the Chickasaws & Choctaws William Blount [not available] A copy of speeches given by the headmen and warriors of the Chickasaw and Choctaw nations and Governor Blount regarding land disputes, boundary lines, and peace. Many maps and boundaries are described.
August 5, 1793 Methods for Postponing a Creek War Henry Knox William Blount "Can there be any practicable modes suggested which would probably postpone a Creek War? If so will you have the goodness to point out such as you may think most effectual for that purpose."
November 15, 1794 Aggression by Creek Indians General James Robertson William Blount General Robertson has ordered Captain Evans to Clarksville to scout on the frontiers of Tennessee county for fifteen days, affording the settlement temporary relief. Discusses the detachment of militia that pursued the Indians who killed and slaughtered the families of Colonels Fitsworth and Sevier. The general wants Congress to take action against the hgostile Creeks. The general writes that...
August 27, 1790 Instructions to Governor Blount Regarding the Treaty of Holston Henry Knox William Blount Henry Knox instructs Governor Blount on the President's policies on Indian affairs in the territory south of the Ohio River, especially regarding the Cherokee Indians. He also requests that Blount renegotiate the geographical boundaries of the treaty, and provides detailed instructions on the desired results. He tells Blount about the attack on Major Doughty's party by a small band of Indians,...
November 7, 1794 Southwest Indian relations McCleish William Blount Letter to Governor William Blount of Southwest Territory, regarding relations with the Southwestern Indians. Mentions one Bill Colbert, who happened upon a canoe with a Cherokee man and four prisoners (two women and two children).
August 31, 1784 All is Well at French Creek Frederick Foose Samuel Hodgdon Reports that all is well at the magazine at French Creek and requests one month's pay to be given to the bearer, Henry Smith.
September 28, 1793 Extract of letter from Captain Jonas Fauche from the files of executive, Georgia Governor Telfair, reporting on killings of Creek warriors, taking of prisoners Captain Jonas Fauche [not available] In this extract addressed to Georgia Governor Telfair, executive files, Captain Jonas Fauche reports on the Indian theft of horses, killing of Creek warriors, the taking of prisoners, discovery of scalps, and a report that warriors have gone to Cumberland.
July 4, 1795 Supply of Troops and Discussion of Treaty with Great Britain Timothy Pickering Anthony Wayne Transmitted letter pertaining to family of officer held prisoner by Indian tribe. Enclosed copy of newspaper containing treaty negotiated with British by Mr. Jay. Chickasaw and Chocktaw chiefs arrived at War Office seeking protection from Creek Nation and possibly seeking supplies from U.S. government. Discussed usability of hats provided by military for troops, has submitted for additional...
June 18, 1800 Note from the Chiefs of the Creek Nation Franco Gelabert Benjamin Hawkins Gelabert has received Hawkins' letter inclosing a note from the Chief of the Creek Nations to the Spanish government in Florida.
June 16, 1795 Peace with Creek Nation James Seagrove Timothy Pickering Announced he was leaving for frontier with Creek Chiefs after confirming peace with the Creek Nation and the U.S.
June 24, 1798 Negotiations Between Hawkins and the Creek Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry A lengthy letter addressing the negotiations between Hawkins and the Creek Indians. The peace belt is also mentioned as well as the introduction of farming and manufacturing.
January 7, 1800 Payment to Edward Wright Benjamin Hawkins James McHenry From the Creek Agency, Hawkins makes payment of $1656.80 to Edward Wright, United States factor, expenditures in the Creek Department for final quarter of 1799.
September 26, 1793 Letter from Colonel Melton, Green County, to Georgia Governor Telfair reporting on operations against Creek Nation [not available] [not available] From Executive files of W. Urquhart, a report from Green County, Lieutenant Colonel Melton of 1st Regiment, Green County, reports that he has burned huts in Creek town, killed Warriors, and taken prisoners. Asks that prisoners be moved away from frontier people for their own safety. In need of arms and ammunition; frontier may be evacuated if no resupply.
October 2, 1789 Notification that commissioners have not concluded a treaty of peace between United States and Creek nation Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton US Commissioners inform Governor of Georgia that they have not concluded treaty between United States and Creek nation. However, positive and repeated assurances were given by Alexander McGillivray and all the Creek chiefs that peace would not be violated.
July 15, 1790 Regarding Alexander McGillivray and the Creek chiefs passing through Philadelphia Thomas Mifflin Henry Knox Knox can assure President Washington that, if Alexander McGillivray and the Creek chiefs pass through Philadelphia on their way to New York, they will receive every proper attention.
March 21, 1793 Deposition by eleven inhabitants of Glynn County Inhabitants of Glynn County Georgia W. Urquhart Extract from files of Ex Dept. William Urquhart. Inhabitants' report being robbed and plundered by Creek Indians, including cattle and horses. They say the Creek Indians have been treated kindly. Another extract comes from Mr Cooke to the Honorable Judge Houston dated at Williamsburg 21 March 1793 indicating that amount of cattle stolen around 2000.
August 7, 1790 Treaty at New York with the Creek Nation Henry Knox [not available] Treaty between the United States and Creek Nation. A clear boundary is established and the Creeks cede all land to the north and east of the boundary in exchange for an annual sum of $1,500 paid by the United States government to the Creek Nation. The Creeks agree to release all prisoners and the United States government permits the Creek Nation to punish any U.S. citizen who trespasses onto...
1798 Account with the Creek Nation Unknown Author [not available] Itemized listing of an account of the Creek Nation with the United States