Viewing 1–25 of 2,026 documents: "Altamaha River"

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
August 20, 1790 Regarding Treaty of New York between Creeks and United States Henry Knox Governor Edward Telfair President Washington transmits copy of Treaty of New York to Georgia Governor. Asks for faithful execution of the Treaty by both parties. Discusses that land claimed by Georgia was never clearly established. Discusses Treaty of Galphinton and land lying eastward of the forks of Oconee and Oakmulgee to St. Mary's River and between the temporary line and the old line from the Altamaha to the St...
November 19, 1791 Treaty of Protection Henry Knox William Blount United States provides protection to the undersigned Creeks.
August 7, 1790 Treaty at New York with the Creek Nation Henry Knox [not available] Treaty between the United States and Creek Nation. A clear boundary is established and the Creeks cede all land to the north and east of the boundary in exchange for an annual sum of $1,500 paid by the United States government to the Creek Nation. The Creeks agree to release all prisoners and the United States government permits the Creek Nation to punish any U.S. citizen who trespasses onto...
May 25, 1791 Logistics and Disbursement Henry Knox Henry Burbeck Advised troops arriving at Rock Landing on the Oconee river near the location of the future boundary as designated by "the treaty". Clothing requested by Burbeck will be shipped immediately from New York to Savannah. Enclosed invoice of supplies shipped to Burbeck that are to be used judiciously on the sick.
May 9, 1794 Indian nations in Georgia Constant Freeman Henry Knox Letter from Constant Freemn, agent for the Department of War in Georgia, regarding various Indian nations in that reason.
October 5, 1793 Letter from Timothy Bernard [Barnard] to Major Gaither regarding Cowetas horse thieves and revenge for those killed at Little Oakfuskee Village Timothy Barnard [Bernard] Henry Gaither In addressing horse theft, identifies the Cowetas as the culprits and who will be objects of revenge for those killed at Little Oakfuskee Village. Asks Gaither to warn people to be on guard along the river and avoid unnecessary exposure.
November 28, 1785 Old Tassel's Map of Cherokee territorial claims The Tassel [not available] This document is a copy of the map drawn by Old Tassel to support Cherokee territorial claims at the Hopewell Treaty.
October 28, 1792 Indian Relations James Seagrove Henry Knox Expects arrival of Creek chiefs. Enclosed copy of letter from McGillivray, the letter does not please Seagrove. Seagrove discussed McGillivray's duplicitous nature and his underhanded actions. Hopes the U.S. will reprimand any Indian tribe for actions taken against the nation.
August 29, 1789 Instructions to the Commissioners for Treating with the Souther Indians George Washington Commissioners Instructions to Lincoln, Griffin, and Humphreys, Commissioners for negotiating treaties of peace with the Indian tribes and nations south of the Ohio River. The various objects of the mission are detailed, the overarching goal of which is to negotiate peace and, as far as possible, align the interests of the tribes with those of the United States. The commissioners have to negotiate with the...
August 3, 1795 Treaty with the Western Indians War Office Unknown Recipient Articles of peace proposed in a treaty between the United States and the Northwest Indian tribes; later known as the Treaty of Ghent.
January 3, 1793 Report on the Southwestern Frontier James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove discusses the situation on the frontier which is mostly peaceful despite several incidents involving violence by Indians.
November 11, 1790 Recommendation of Captain James Howell; complaints over Creek Treaty James Gunn Alexander Hamilton Recommends Captain John Howell to command the Cutter intended to be stationed in the Georgia District. The late treaty with the Creeks is much complained of in the southern states; in particular there is opposition to the line drawn by commissioner [Knox]. This encouragement has given to savage insolence, spurred them to action, encouraged killing of defenseless inhabitants on frontier.
August 3, 1795 Peace Treaty Anthony Wayne [not available] Official sealed document securing peace between U.S. and Western Indian Nations. Set boundary line between nations as Cayahoga River.
December 7, 1798 Evacuation of Spanish from the Mississippi River James McHenry John Wilkins, Jr. The Spanish have abandoned posts on the Mississippi River, rendering it necessary to send a galley from Pittsburgh. The galley should be prepared to descend the Ohio River at any moment's notice.
June 17, 1796 [The Invitation or talk of the President delivered this day as follows. - To the beloved Men, Chiefs, and Warriors of the Creek Nation.-] George Washington [not available] Cited negotiations in New York that secured a peaceful boundary line in Georgia. However, neither the people of Georgia or Creek Nation were satisfied with boundary and took prisoners and property. Discussed Seagrove's agreement with some Creek chiefs and no additional boundary disputes. Formally invites Creek Nation to Coleraine to formalize peace and trade agreement. Outlines land desired...
August 16, 1793 Speech to the Indian Nations Commissioners Chiefs and Warriors Council of Indian Nations at Rapids of Miami River End of negotiations due to inability to reach agreement on boundary. Indians demanded Ohio River as boundary, U.S. requested land west of the Ohio River.
July 13, 1788 Speech to Chiefs of Nations Assembled at Tawa River and Mouth of Detroit River Arthur St. Clair Chiefs of Nations assembled at Tawa River and Mouth of Detroit River In a speech to Chiefs of Nations assembled at Tawa River and Mouth of Detroit River, St. Clair expresses impatience to hear of chiefs arrival. Expresses displeasure that instances of unprovoked hostility. United States desires peace, but if Indians desire war, they will have it. Expects an answer soon.
July 6, 1789 Hostilities still rage between Georgia and the Creek Indians. Henry Knox George Washington Knox informs the President of the state of Georgia's war with the Creeks. He includes a biographical description of Creek chief Alexander McGillivray and why he believes McGillivray distrusts Georgia. He describes three treaties Georgia entered into with the Creek Nation. This document (6 July) is the second part of the original report on Indian Affairs that Knox sent to the President on 15 June...
January 15, 1787 Delay in Correspondence Caused by Icy River William Price Henry Knox The river is so full of ice it is not possible to safely send the three pounders which Knox requested. The guns will either be sent once the river is clear or Knox can have them sent by land. Price will draw two months pay at the first opportunity. Any commands from Knox can be left at Widow Warren's in the highlands; Price will visit once a week to retrieve them.
May 24, 1787 An Account of the State of Creek Indians James White Henry Knox James White, superintendent of the Southern District, reports that the threatened Creek invasion has subsided. Creeks favorably inclined by the liberal sentiments of commissioners from Congress; although they resent the State of Georgia for their encroachments. Alexander McGillivray claims allegiance to United States, but not Georgia. Strength is about 6000 gunmen; have support from the...
June 5, 1800 Who has taken charge of the War Department? Etc. Isaac Craig Samuel Hodgdon Amidst a discussion of several matters, Craig declares that he would have expected Hodgdon to inform him who had taken charge of the War Department. He had hoped that his friend Henry would have had an invitation. Colonel Strong and part of the 2nd Regiment have arrived at the encampment on the Allegheny River where he will stay until joined by troops coming from Staunton and Winchester. They...
August 16, 1793 Continuation of War Benjamin Lincoln Chiefs and Warriors Council of Indian Nations at Rapids of Miami River Inability to agree on boundary line between Indian Nations and U.S. the U.S. could not reach a peace agreement with the Western Indian Nations.
June 14, 1792 Preventing Thievery of Cattle and Horses James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove informs Knox that he is trying to intervene with the Creeks to prevent thievery of cattle and horses that is the cause of considerable ire among the white settlers. He does not agree with General McGillivray that war is imminent. Seagrove has also been in communication with the Spanish governor of St. Augustine in order to maintain cordial relations with the Spanish.
March 17, 1793 Alarming & Melancholy Account of Creek Depredations James Seagrove Henry Knox Seagrove provides a detailed account of depredations apparently committed by renegade Lower Creeks.
December 22, 1795 Treaty of Greenville George Washington Unknown Recipient Peace treaty between United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Chipewas, Potowatamies, Eel-River, Weeas Kickapoos, Piankashaws, Kaskaskias, and Miamis. Prisoner release negotiated and borders decided upon.