Viewing 1–25 of 54 documents

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
January 9, 1789 Treaty of Fort Harmar: Between the United States and the Six Nations Arthur St. Clair Chiefs Six Nations Agreement between the United States government and Indian tribes with claims to the Ohio Country. Representatives of the Six Nations, the Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawatomi and Sauk met with Arthur St. Clair governor of the Northwest Territory, and other American leaders Josiah Harmar and Richard Butler.
April 5, 1790 Court of inquiry relative to Lacassagne's complaint; return of troops; Lieutenant Armstrong's mission Josiah Harmar Henry Knox Mentions court of inquiry relative to Lacassagne's complaint against Captain Ashton. Although Ashton's conduct not justified, the fellows in the vicinity of the garrison are such vagabonds as not to be entitled to the privileges of citizens. Encloses monthly return of troops. Lieutenant Armstrong left rapids of Ohio. Major Doughty, with Mr Vigo, at Wabash Island, preparing to start for...
October 26, 1791 Arrival at Fort Hamilton Robert Benham Samuel Hodgdon Benham announces his arrival at Fort Hamilton and promises that every effort will be made to comply with Hodgdon's engagement by October 26th.
October 27, 1791 Dismissal of Patrick Lacy Michael G. Houdin Samuel Hodgdon Houdin declares that Hodgdon no doubt will be surprised to see Patrick Lacy again at Fort Washington. He is no soldier and the boys seem to be so displeased with him that, in the interests of harmony, it seemed best to send him back to Hodgdon who might be able to employ him to greater advantage.
October 29, 1791 News from Camp Thomas Butler Samuel Hodgdon The previous day the Indians killed one of Capt. Edward Butler's men and wounded one other who died later. They have also either killed or taken one militia man. Our Indians have gone out with Capt. Sparks and four other men at the same time the road parties set out. Hodgdon is asked to send out one keg of whiskey.
October 29, 1791 Family in Distress Richard Clarke Samuel Hodgdon Since his family is likely to be distressed, Clarke has nobody else to turn to but Hodgdon. Clarke lives in the little hut near the slaughterhouse and had even made improvements to it. His wife has informed him that Mr. Hunt wants to turn her out so he asks Hodgdon to intercede on her behalf until he returns.
October 30, 1791 Hodgdon's Horse Michael G. Houdin Samuel Hodgdon Mr. Greenlee, Quartermaster of the militia, has just this moment arrived with Hodgdon's horse. Houdin would be happy to take charge of him but has no place to secure him nor is there any food for him. So the horse is being sent back to Hodgdon with a gentleman who will take good care of him and lead him all the way back.
November 7, 1791 Relieving the Wounded Robert Buntin Samuel Hodgdon The clothing sent on is a little wet having gone through the river and there is no place here to open the bales with any kind of safety. The General thinks that they should be sent as they are on to Fort Washington as soon as possible. All the horses here, including those with the clothing, have gone with provisions to relieve the wounded that lie between this place and Fort Washington. There is...
November 13, 1791 Additional Houses John Armstrong Samuel Hodgdon The present buildings, independent ot those holding public stores, will not contain more than twenty men. Four or five additional houses therefore must be built. Armstrong has directed the logs to be cut so if Hodgdon can furnish a [?] for two or three days the houses can be completed. Two or more carpenters might be necessary.
November 7, 1791 Building a Flat, Etc. John Armstrong Samuel Hodgdon It seems proper to employ some person to build a flat which will be much needed since the river will not be fordable for the remainder of the season. Should Hodgdon think it proper to send two sawyers with tools and one or two mechanics, Armstrong will superintend the building of one. The grindstone at Fort Washington is not very large and will in one month be worn out so a new one should be sent...
November 21, 1791 Recommendation of John Davis, Etc. Thomas Bonds Samuel Hodgdon Relative to Dr. Bond's friend John Davis, he notes that if Hodgdon will take him by the hand it will be gratefully remembered. Hodgdon may feel confident in Davis's industry, sobriety, and integrity so Bond hopes that he can find something for him to do in this flourishing country. Bond is interested in whatever advantages may be in this part of the world as he holds a great deal of valuable...
December 4, 1791 Mistake in Forwarding Clothing, Etc. John Armstrong Samuel Hodgdon Armstrong is sorry that a mistake was made in forwarding the clothing brought by the pack horses. He will ask the General to let him have shirts and shoes from the stores at Fort Hamilton to be replaced by his shirts and shoes from Fort Washington. Included in the return of the pack horses are one anvil, two vices, twenty axes, and two casks of nails.
December 11, 1791 Clothing, Etc. John Armstrong Samuel Hodgdon Armstrong fears that Hodgdon will be disappointed in not receiving the clothing mentioned in his recent letter. Armstrong has some of the clothing, shirts and shoes, but it is not marked so it is impossible to tell which is for the levies and which is for the artillery. Since he has no invoice he is not willing to part with them.
December 19, 1791 Travel Robert Barr Samuel Hodgdon Request for supplies from Fort Hamilton, travel route of Hodgdon discussed.
December 21, 1791 Clothing, Etc. Isaac Craig Samuel Hodgdon Craig has forwarded care of Captain Cushing several articles, including clothing. Mentions a defeat, general panic, and the Northern Indians. No news yet received from Congress.
December 22, 1791 Letter from Captain Joseph Shaylor on Captain Hardang's performance of duty at Fort Jefferson Joseph Shaylor Samuel Hodgdon Writing to Samuel Hodgdon at Fort Washington, Joseph Shaylor, from Fort Jefferson, gives his opinion on the performance of duty of Captain Hardang, citing a confused situation at Fort Jefferson garrison which has rendered it impossible to have accurate accounts. All that could be done has been done by the Captain, and no man could be more attentive to duty.
December 24, 1791 Letter from Captain Armstrong to Samuel Hodgdon on state of supply John Armstrong Samuel Hodgdon From Fort Hamilton, Armstrong reports to Hodgdon at Fort Washington that he received letter from General directing him to forward to Fort Jefferson certain articles of clothing which were taken forward by Mr Masralick, who was given two horses and a supply of Indian corn. Mr Kitchel says he does not intend to let Hodgdon have anymore. Armstrong says his building is complete; found a strong horse...
January 12, 1792 This Unfortunate Affair, Etc. Robert Barr Samuel Hodgdon The only course to follow is to have Col. Darke represent the true state of the case to Congress and at the same time draw a draft for the appropriate amount. Surely Col. Darke will do everything in his power to help us out of this unfortunate affair given his own role in leading us into it.
January 17, 1791 Letter from Israel Ludlow regarding escorts during survey of Miami Purchase lands Israel Ludlow Samuel Hodgdon Agreeable to Hodgdon's request, Ludlow has written to Major Leiglon respecting the escorts for his survey of land and encloses Leiglon's written answer.
January 30, 1792 Getting to the Battleground Robert Benham Samuel Hodgdon Benham announces that he arrived at Fort Jefferson in the rain. The supplies are still about fifteen miles behind with a small escort. He believes that his route will be difficult until he gets to the battleground and hopes that the heavy rain will not prevent crossing the creeks in order to get to that place. He will set out in the morning.Other than that he has nothing strange to relate.
February 2, 1792 Keeping the Horses Well John Smith Samuel Hodgdon Smith announces that he has purchased the blades of five acres which when added to what he has at home will, with corn, keep Hodgdon's horses well. The stable will be satisfactory for the prime horses and Smith would like to be furnished with a horse for his own use. The horses should be sent immediately and the pack horses will be provided for as well. He has nothing to say about prices but...
February 8, 1792 24 Horses Received John Smith Samuel Hodgdon Smith announced that he has received all 24 of Hodgdon's horses which seem to be hearty and doing well. He has heard that there are a number of horses on the other side of the Ohio which can also be brought over if Hodgdon wants. Smith will ask some his neighbors to board them which they will do for a small reward. He has asked about public strays in the town and if he receives any will inform...
February 10, 1792 The Coming Campaign Robert Barr Samuel Hodgdon Barr is going to Philadelphia soon and asks Hodgdon to give him whatever news he has on the operation of the coming campaign. He wants to be on his way out of Lexington early so as to be ready for the campaign. He expects to have a large quantity of goods on hand, perhaps the largest in the district.
February 14, 1792 Accomodation of Sixty Horses John Smith Samuel Hodgdon Smith assures Hodgdon that rather than be judged as an enemy of his country, he would resign his business. But if the accomodation of Hodgdon's horses is acceptable to Hodgdon Smith can take in sixty for the time prescribed.
March 19, 1792 Bags & Other Articles Forwarded John Moylan Samuel Hodgdon Moylan expresses surprise at Hodgdon's inquiry regarding bags and other articles that he forwarded to Col.Boone. He has the account receipt for same which he had heard Boone had paid. He has written Boone who should communicate to Hodgdon necessary information to correct this mistake. If they are still at Limestone, Moylan has directed him to forward them to Hodgdon immediately.