Viewing 1–25 of 69 documents

Date Title Author Recipient Summary
July 12, 1784 Letter to the Commissioner of Army Accounts John Wereat John Pierce Letter to the Commissioner of Army Accounts and Paymaster General.
September 18, 1789 Reply from Governor George Walton to Federal Commissioners George Walton [not available] Reply to a note from the Commissioners sending letters for the Governor. The Commissioners were unable to present the letters to the Walton in person because he is ill. Walton thanks them for the note. He has been unable to act on their letter of the 11th regarding provisions. He would be happy to meet with the Commissioners in the morning.
September 18, 1789 Proceeding of the Executive Authority George Walton Benjamin Lincoln Brief note to the commissioners following the meeting with them. Walton encloses a proceeding of the Executive Authority, by express.
September 18, 1789 Notes of assurance from State of Georgia regarding negotiations with Creek Indians George Walton Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Governor forwards expression of support from the Georgia executive authority, noting every assistance to give facility and effect to negotiations with Creek Indians.
September 18, 1789 Request to keep Indians together in preparation for treaty talks Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Andrew Pickens Commissioners honored by receipt of letter addressed on 16 August. They are astonished at the information from Pickens and Osborne, which is diametrically contrary to ideas of Governor of Georgia. Ask that Pickens and Osborne continue to keep Indians together and ask that they forward accompanying letter to Alexander McGillivray.
September 18, 1789 Letter to Alexander McGillivray Expressing Astonishment that Indians May Leave Before Treaty Talks Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Alexander McGillivray In a copy of letter to Alexander McGillivray sent to Pickens and Osborne, commissioners express astonishment that the Indians might disperse shortly and tell McGillivray that they will be at the Rock Landing in two days, and assure McGillivray that if a lasting peace and friendship is not established, it will not be their fault.
October 2, 1789 Notification that commissioners have not concluded a treaty of peace between United States and Creek nation Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton US Commissioners inform Governor of Georgia that they have not concluded treaty between United States and Creek nation. However, positive and repeated assurances were given by Alexander McGillivray and all the Creek chiefs that peace would not be violated.
October 3, 1789 Questions regarding legitimacy of previous treaties between Creeks and Georgia Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department George Walton Request for information regarding treaties at Augusta, 1783, Galphinton, 1785, and Shoulderbone, 1786. Principal points are whether all lands belonging to the upper and lower Creeks are common property of whole nation, or whether the lands were ceded to Georgia by the three treaties. Were the proprietors of the lands stated to have been ceded to Georgia present or fully represented by the...
October 4, 1789 Regarding legitimacy of previous treaties between Creeks and Georgia George Walton Commissioners for Indian Affairs in Southern Department Governor of Georgia notes that previous treaties, namely Augusta 1783, Galphinton 1785, and Shoulderbone 1786, between Georgia and Creeks, were legitimately agreed upon by both parties.
February 16, 1790 Letter from the Governor of Georgia Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Gov. Telfair informs Knox of the peaceful disposition of the Creeks. Telfair also mentions trade with the Indians.
November 11, 1790 Recommendation of Captain James Howell; complaints over Creek Treaty James Gunn Alexander Hamilton Recommends Captain John Howell to command the Cutter intended to be stationed in the Georgia District. The late treaty with the Creeks is much complained of in the southern states; in particular there is opposition to the line drawn by commissioner [Knox]. This encouragement has given to savage insolence, spurred them to action, encouraged killing of defenseless inhabitants on frontier.
November 14, 1792 Serious and Early Attack Being Meditated Governor Edward Telfair Henry Gaither Governor Telfair urges that a reinforcement of federal cavalry be ordered to the western frontier in anticipation of a possible attack by Cherokees as retribution for the murder of several of their own by whites.
November 19, 1792 Demise of Major Call, Etc. Henry Gaither Samuel Hodgdon Gaither was sick when he landed in Georgia which held him eight days in Savannah. On the ninth day he mounted his horse and in four days arrived in Augusta and travelled on to Rock Land where he found Major Call alive. He died within 24 hours and was buried with the honors of war. His widow remained with Gaither for two weeks and was pleased to find herself in the company of gentlemen.
November 20, 1792 Preserving the Peace & Preparing for War Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Telfair discusses the steps he has taken to bring to justice the offenders who murdered friendly Cherokees. He warns Knox that if the endeavors to preserve the peace are not successful, the federal government must provide the additional resources needed to defend against marauding Indians.
December 5, 1792 Savage Principle of Retaliation Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair discusses the measures taken to prevent further violence between whites and Indians on the western frontier of Georgia.
March 4, 1793 Letter from Governor of Georgia Edward Telfair to Major Henry Gaither regarding use of militia in response to recent outrages by whites and Indians Governor Edward Telfair Henry Gaither From Georgia State House 4 August, 1793. Governor Telfair cites recent outrages by whites and Indians as requiring a request for protection by available militia. Telfair inquires to Major Gaither on the status, location and numbers of militia forces. Requests that ten foot militia under command of a sergeant be stationed at Norris Station, Bush's Station, Hillhouse's Iron Works, and at a station...
March 28, 1793 Letter from Governor Telfair to Major Gaither regarding murders and outrages by Creeks against whites in County of Glynn Governor Edward Telfair Henry Gaither Governor Telfair has received a report regarding murder of whites at Glynn County by Creeks. He asks Major Gaither to find out what can be obtained by Federal Government in order to deal with emergency.
April 3, 1793 Indian Hostilities Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Edward Telfair describes Indian violence to the Secretary at War. The Governor mentions the murders of Daniel Moffett and John Herring.
April 3, 1793 Letter from Edward Telfair Governor of Georgia to Secretary of War Henry Knox on robbery and murder at Traders Hill on St Marys Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Telfair reports to Knox the details of murder and robbery by Creeks at Robert Seagrove's store at Traders Hill on St Marys River. Others were killed, Telfair reports. Volunteers found 3 men and a girl murdered; they were settlers. Horses stolen; women and child taken prisoner. Settlers are defenseless in Camden and Glynn Counties and must leave settlements. Governor taking temporary measures ...
April 9, 1793 Satisfaction at the Prospect of Aid Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair expresses his satisfaction at the prospect of Georgia receiving aid in establishing a magazine of arms and benefitting from the assistance of the militias of neighboring States in defending against marauding Creeks.
May 8, 1793 Governor of Georgia writes to Secretary at War regarding Indian hostilities Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair writes to Secretary Knox and calls for war against the tribes on the frontier. Telfair tells Knox to "let no idea of peace so far amuse as to divert the necessary and immediate preparations for war."
June 12, 1793 Indian Hostilities Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair writes to Secretary at War Knox to request more men and supplies to support military action on the frontier.
June 18, 1793 Twiggs Halted his Expedition Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair informs Secretary Knox that due to a lack of provisions General Twiggs halted his expedition.
July 24, 1793 Governor of Georgia writes to Secretary at War regarding Indian hostilities Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair informs Secretary Knox that he has intelligence indicating Creek weakness and restates his desire for a military strike against hostile towns. Governor reports the death of an Indian half-breed named Cornell at the hands of Georgia forces.
July 30, 1793 Governor of Georgia writes to Secretary at War regarding Indian hostilities Governor Edward Telfair Henry Knox Governor Telfair informs Secretary Knox of his intent to keep the President informed of all troop movements.