Results from the Negotiations with Hostile Indians

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Source Name Image(s)
CollectionState Historical Society of Wisconsin: Draper MSS-David Shepherd Papers view image
CollectionState Historical Society of Wisconsin: Draper MSS-Frontier Wars MSS (no image)
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Document Information
Date September 3, 1793
Author Name Henry Knox (primary) Location: War Department
Recipient Name Thomas Mifflin (primary)
Summary Indians from Upper Ohio wanted to draw boundary line at the Ohio River which was not acceptable to Commissioners who ended the negotiations.
Document Format Copy of Signed Document
Document Notes [not available]
Content Notes [not available]
Related Persons/Groups Thomas Mifflin; Henry Knox; Indians; Indian Nation; hostiles; President of United States; George Washington; Secretary of War; treaty commissioners; Indians north of Ohio River; Wyandots; Delawares; Shawanese; Miamis; Captain Joseph Brant; Brandt; Mohawk; Mohocks; Governor Mifflin; ;
Related Places War Department; upper Ohio; Ohio river; river; Sandusky; Detroit river; Fort Erie; Pennsylvania; ;
Keywords protection of frontiers; treaty; patrols; scouts; defense; ;
Key Phrases [not available]
Transcription

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War Department September 3, 1793
Sir
I am instructed by the President of the United States to state to your Excellency that information has this day been received by express, that, notwithstanding the utmost efforts of the Commissioners, the pacific overtures to the hostile Indians North of the Ohio have been rendered abortive by their insisting upon the Ohio as the boundary.
That the Commissioners arrived at the mouth of Detroit river of the 21st of July, and waited there until the 17th Ulto. when having received the definitive answer of the Indians the Commissioners sailed for Fort Erie where they arrived the 23d Ulto.
The Commissioners were not even admitted to an interview with the body of the hostile Indians but the Communications were carried on by deputations from them.
It appears the tribes most determined for War are the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanese and Miamis although it is said a considerable proportion of these were for peace.
It is understood that the six Nations including Captain Brandt and his Mohocks, strongly urged the hostile Indians to make peace with the United States.
Affairs being thus circumstanced it is probable that the Sword only can afford ample protection to the frontiers.
It is understood that the Militia embodied on the frontiers of Pennsylvania under your orders together with the patroles called Scouts are deemed sufficient for their defence. But it may be proper to caution
[stamped] 225
caution the people immediately that every measure necessary to guard against surprize should be adopted.
I am Sir with great respect your obedient servant
H Knox
The Excellency Governor Mifflin
(Copy)

War Department September 3, 1793 166
Sir
I am instructed by the President of the United States to state to your Excellency that information has this day been received by express, that notwithstanding the utmost efforts of the Commissioners, the pacific overtures to the hostile Indians North of the Ohio have been rendered abortive by their insisting upon the Ohio as the boundary.
That the Commissioners arrived at the mouth of Detroit River on the 21st of July and waited there until the 17th Ulto when having received the definitive answer of the Indians the Commissioners sailed for Fort Erie where they arrived the 23d Ulto.
The Commissioners were not even admitted to an interview with the body of the hostile Indians but the Communications were carried by deputations from them.
It appears the tribes most determined for War are the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanese and Miamis although it is said a considerable proportion of these were for peace.
It is understood that the six Nations including Captain Brandt and his Mohocks, strongly urged the hostile Indians to make peace with the United States.
Affairs being thus circumstances it is probable that the Sword only can afford ample protection to the frontiers.
It is understood that hte Militia embodied on the frontiers of Pennsylvania under your orders together with the patroles called Scouts are deemed Sufficient for their defence. But is may be proper to
caution the people immediately that every measure necessary to guard against surprize should be adopted.
I am Sir with great respect Your obedient Servant
H Knox
His Excellency Governor Mifflin
(Copy)