Request for pay despite records lost during St. Clair defeat

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Source Name Image(s)
CollectionNational Archives and Records Administration: 2nd Cong, Senate, Sec Treas Reports, RG46 view image
CollectionNational Archives and Records Administration: 2nd Cong, Senate, Sec Treas Reports, RG46 view image
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Document Information
Date July 21, 1792
Author Name Lieutenant Colonel Henry Carberry (primary) Location: Frederick Town
Recipient Name Henry Knox (primary)
Summary Carbery informs Secretary of War Henry Knox that he is sending Ensign Campbell Smith to request pay for Carbery's company of levies. He laments the loss of pay records during the St Clair defeat of 4 November 1791, but asks for justice for his men. Carbery goes on to report that recruiting is dull, but should improve when the harvest is over.
Document Format Letter Signed
Document Notes [not available]
Content Notes [not available]
Related Persons/Groups Henry Knox; Henry Carbery; Ensign Campbell Smith; Secretary of War; War Office; ;
Related Places Frederick Town; Georgetown; Philadelphia; War Office; ;
Keywords [not available]
Key Phrases [not available]
Transcription

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From Henry Carberry
Frederick Town
July 21 1792
[encircled: 170]
The Secretary of War
Ensign C. Smith
Frederick Town July 21, 1792
Sir,
Ensign Campbell Smith of my company, whom I value much as an Officer of promising Talents, will do himself the Honor, by my Instructions, to wait on you, and request you will be so obliging as to Order ^[insert] that [/insert] the money due my Company of Levies be put into his hands. Our papers having been lost with the 4th of last November, I forward everything in my power to satisfy that I claim nothing more than justice for them. Recruiting at this place is dull at present, but when Harvest is finally over it is thought we shall again meet with success in the mean while if I could be suffered to detach my Ensign to George Town 44 miles from hence, perhaps we might get some. Eight here at present I have the Honor &c
Henry Carberry