Intrigues of William Augustus Bowles

Sources & Images
Source Name Image(s)
CollectionFilson Club: Preston F.P.-Joyes Collection view image
Transcribe this Document
Document Information
Date May 18, 1792
Author Name Alexander McGillivray (primary) Location: Upper Creeks Tallasie
Recipient Name James Seagrove (primary)
Summary Letter from Creek chief to the Indian Agent at the Southern Department. McGillivray had been waiting post month to get Lower gentry into humour of attending to national matters and to recover from confusion by the talks of lying Captain [Bowles], after he was secured by Spaniards. Had some hopes of soon forgetting him. Rumor has it from Orleans that he has made matters worse than ever. Spanish officer has arrived and told Indians that he has orders to prevent running a line or doing any other business with Americans. Invites to a meeting at Pensacola. Last stroke is too much. Bowle's partisans are getting loud about giving away land. Finding Cussetah chiefs still at home, Crandall carries talk to go directly and have line drawn; but since Bowles has given hope of British aid, majority of towns would agree to cede only east side of Oconee.
Document Format Extract of Letter
Document Notes Extract of a letter.
Content Notes [not available]
Related Persons/Groups James Seagrove; Alexander McGillivray; William Augustus Bowles; Crandall; Cussetah chiefs; Spanish; British; Indians; Creeks; chiefs;
Related Places Upper Creeks Tallasie; Spain; Britain; Oconee River;
Keywords [not available]
Key Phrases [not available]
Transcription

[Note: Transcriptions are works in progress and maybe partial. Please help us correct any errors or omissions by signing up for a transcription account.]
Letter from General Alexander McGillioray to James Seagrove Esq inclosed in the foregoing.
Upper Creeks Little Tallasie 18 May 1792.
Dear Sir:
I received your letter of 1st Instant. You have no doubt been expect: ing me some time. I had been waiting this month past to get our [undecipherable] by entry into humour of attending to national matters,and to recover from the confusion they had been thrown into by the Talks of the lying Captain after he was secured by the Spaniards I had some hope of their soon forgetting him and his British Fleets when to my surprize some Indians from Orleans have given and spread reports that has made matters worse than ever, and a Spanish officer has actually arrived and tells the Indians that he has orders to prevent them from running the line or doing any other business with the Americans. And invites to a meeting in September next at Pensacola. This last stroke is too much. The Indians at least a good many are as mad as ever and Bowler's partizans again getting loud about giving away land. Tis no wonder that the Indians are distracted when they are tampered with one
every
every side and am myself in the situation of a keeper of Bedlam and nearly fit for an inhabitant.
Finding that the Cussetah chiefs are still at home. Crandall carrys a talk desiring them in most pressing language to go directly and have the line run, but since Bowles has given hope of British aid as majority of the towns would agree to cede no more than the East side of Oconnee and now they are told to give none at all and I wish that more may not be insisted upon at present to avoid disputes and its horrid consequences a diabolical war, in which they will be supported and in which I will not have any hand.
I am hastening to go and get an explanation from the proper persons and the reasons for their interference. As yet I cannot guess at their motives. your are no stranger to their dispositions. The Indians will report these Spanish talks of themselves.